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  • Environmental Sustainability and Technology
    Protecting native plants is
    important to sustainability
  • Environmental Sustainability and Technology
    Jarrett Miller is part of the
    Campus Clean Up Crew
  • Environmental Sustainability and Technology
    Students pick up trash from
    Stones River as part of a United Way Big Event
  • Environmental Sustainability and Technology
    Rain gardens fulfill a vital ecological role on campus

Environmental Sustainability and Technology

Located squarely at the intersection of science, technology, and psychology, careers in Environmental Sustainability and Technology span myriad job descriptions and represent an endless array of new, exciting challenges. Depending on their interests, students can pursue the very timely topics of energy generation and conservation, water quality, recycling, solid waste management, and environmental safety, both through addressing specific issues and through environmental engineering design. These interdisciplinary programs are invaluable in today's world with its numerous unanswered questions about what's happening to planet Earth.

A job that satisfies...

A job that satisfies...

A student pursuing a degree in Environmental Health and Safety soon realizes one of the real joys of the profession—every day on the job is a day spent making things safer and improving the health and future health of others, be they coworkers, neighbors, or complete strangers. This makes the field satisfying in a way one usually associates with medical occupations. It also makes every day different and every challenge new. “I know that the work I do every day keeps the men and women I work with safe and healthy and able to go home to their families every night,” says Eva Wright, a recent graduate of the program who now works for Antea Group in Seattle, Washington.

Using energy wisely

Using energy wisely

Established in 1999, MTSU's Center for Energy Efficiency (CEE) develops, implements, and advances sound energy management practices for the University and the community. The center provides additional opportunities for students pursuing a concentration in Energy Technology to become involved in projects and initiatives implemented on the campus and beyond. Among its services, the CEE manages the University's recycling program and offers certification seminars, training opportunities, and leadership in achieving energy management and efficiency goals.

The interaction between technology and the environment—and the need to manage it safely—represents a continuously expanding field of career opportunities. Examples include

  • Construction safety manager
  • Development director
  • Ecologist
  • Energy consultant
  • Energy manager
  • Environmental analyst
  • Environmental compliance and sustainability manager
  • Environmental educator
  • Environmental health and safety manager
  • Environmental planner
  • Environmental technologist
  • Hazardous materials administrator
  • Health and safety trainer
  • Occupational health and safety specialist
  • Regulatory compliance and sustainability specialist
  • Risk management engineer
  • Safety consultant
  • Safety inspector
  • Streams and watershed specialis

Employers of MTSU alumni include

  • Alcoa
  • Amazon
  • American Red Cross
  • Arnold Air
  • City of Smyrna
  • Coca Cola
  • EHS lab
  • Firestone
  • Goodrich
  • Johnson Electric
  • Microsoft
  • Middle Tennessee Electric Membership Cooperative
  • Middle Tennessee State University
  • Murfreesboro Water and Sewer
  • Murfreesboro Electric Service
  • Nissan
  • Nucore
  • Rutherford County Government
  • Select Services
  • TVA
  • Vanderbilt Medical
  • Veterans Affairs
  • ViJon

Students who major in the Environmental Sustainability and Technology program pursue a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree. 

Undergraduate students may also pursue a minor in Environmental Science and Technology.

Other undergraduate majors in the Department of Engineering Technology leading to a B.S. include Engineering Technology with three concentrations: Computer Engineering Technology, Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology, or Mechanical Engineering Technology and Construction Management, also with three concentrations: Commercial Construction Management, Electrical Construction Management, or Land Development/Residential Building Construction Management. Interested students may take courses in Pre-engineering and Pre-architecture.

Undergraduate minors available include Electronics, Engineering Systems, Engineering Technology, and Construction Management.

Graduate students can pursue a Master of Science (M.S.) degree in either Engineering Technology or Occupational Health and Safety.

Environmental Sustainability and Technology, B.S.

Department of Engineering Technology 
615-898-2776
Kathy Mathis, program coordinator
Kathy.Mathis@mtsu.edu

The Environmental Sustainability and Technology major includes course work in energy technology in the engineering technology, geosciences, soils as well as the classical sciences departments. This major studies the classic energy sources and the renewable/alternative energy possibilities. Students will be able to apply their knowledge with utility, construction, municipalities, and other energy related industries for energy generation sources as well as conservation efforts.

The requirements for a major include a core, 41 hours in General Education, and a guided cognate of several hours in an identified specialty or concentration. Courses are offered by Agribusiness and Agriscience, Biology, Chemistry, Engineering Technology, and Geosciences.

Typical employment opportunities exist in the various levels of governmental agencies and as environmental consultants in manufacturing, construction, and agricultural industries in such areas as air and water quality control, environmental analysis, recycling, hazardous and solid waste management, and noise.

Students are encouraged to pursue opportunities offered through the Center for Energy Efficiency and the CLEAR Water Institute. The center promotes energy economics and environmental awareness and stewardship for students, faculty, administrators, and others in the community. Through interaction with local, state, and federal associations, the center offers certification seminars, educational and training opportunities, and leadership in achieving energy management and efficiency goals. The institute is an interdisciplinary group of scientists that address environmental issues related to water quality. Undergraduate research opportunities exist.

Students should consult their advisors each semester to plan their schedules.

Freshman

 

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • EST 2810 - Introduction to Environmental Science

    3 credit hours

    The technical, economic, and political aspects of environmental science. Introduction to specific problems dealing with many pollution issues. Specific monitoring, abatement techniques, and equipment. An overview of energy production processes, industrial pollution problems, air, noise, solid and hazardous wastes, along with economic and environmental concerns. Field trips, lecture, and research projects and/or papers highlight specific topics of special interest to students.

  • MATH 1530 - Applied Statistics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra and a Math Enhanced ACT 19 or greater or equivalent. Descriptive statistics, probability, and statistical inference. The inference unit covers means, proportions, and variances for one and two samples, and topics from one-way ANOVA, regression and correlation analysis, chi-square analysis, and nonparametrics.

 

  • MATH 1730 - Pre-Calculus  4 credit hours  (Math) OR

    MATH 1730 - Pre-Calculus

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 or successful completion of high school precalculus course. An integrated and rigorous study of the algebra and trigonometry needed to successfully attempt calculus. Emphasis on functions, their analysis and their applications. Level of algebraic sophistication developed above that found in MATH 1710. Topics include exponentials and logarithms, analysis of graphs, and word problems. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  (Math)

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

 

  • CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci) AND

    CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: High school chemistry. Corequisite: CHEM 1111. Fundamental concepts of atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometric relationships, periodic properties of the elements, thermochemistry, and properties of gases. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II  4 credit hours  AND

    CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Corequisite: CHEM 1121. Chemical equilibrium, solid and liquid states of matter, chemistry of acids and bases, principles of chemical kinetics, precipitation reactions, elementary thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • BIOL 1110 - General Biology  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci) AND

    BIOL 1110 - General Biology

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: BIOL 1111. Primarily for Biology majors and minors and other science-oriented students. Biological principles and processes, including introduction to the nature of science, cells (structure, function, metabolism, division), genetics, evolution, viruses, bacteria, protists, and fungi. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory. While BIOL 1110 can be used to fulfill half the 8-hour General Education requirement for Natural Sciences, it is the first semester of a two-semester sequence primarily designed for science majors.

Subtotal: 28 Hours

 

Sophomore

 

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

 

  • BIOL 1120 - General Biology  4 credit hours  AND

    BIOL 1120 - General Biology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111. Corequisite: BIOL 1121. Primarily for Biology majors and minors and other science-oriented students. Survey of plants and animals emphasizing evolution, structure, function, reproduction, growth, and ecology. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • CHEM 3010 - Organic Chemistry I  4 credit hours  AND

    CHEM 3010 - Organic Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121 or equivalent. Corequisite: CHEM 3011. Types of carbon compounds, their nomenclature, reactions, and physical properties. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • GEOL 1030 - Introduction to Earth Science

    3 credit hours

    Corequisite: GEOL 1031. The earth and its relationship to its space and environment emphasized. Forces and processes which combine to mold the face of the earth and its atmosphere, as well as the internal constitution of the earth. Three hours lecture. Together, GEOL 1030 and GEOL 1031 satisfy 4 hours of the Natural Sciences portion of the General Education requirement.

  • PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2011. Web-based discussion class to be taken in conjunction with cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2011. Classical mechanics traditionally covered in a first-semester college physics course. Kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Class time used for discussion of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2010. Group-oriented problems course taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2010. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2010 discussion class. Covers kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

 

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

 

  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours
  • Cognate 3 credit hours
  • Elective 3 credit hours

Subtotal: 31 Hours

Junior

 

  • ET 3920 - Industrial Internship I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Student is employed by an acceptable industry for industrial experience. Credit given for actual work with employer. Arrangement for this course must be made in advance. Pass/Fail.

  • EST 4760 - Seminar in Environmental Science and Technology

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite: Permission of department. Student presentations on capstone projects. Incorporates guest speakers, readings, reflective thought, career and job search, and discussions on environmental issues.

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours
  • Cognate courses 17 credit hours

 

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 30 Hours

Senior

 

  • EST 4770 - Pollution Control Technology

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: 8 hours each in biology, chemistry, and physics, or consent of instructor. Solid waste and water pollution control technology. Legislative regulations and quality standards, pollution types and sources, detection and analysis instruments, and treatment or abatement principles and practices.

  • EST 4980 - Environmental Public Health

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: 8 hours college biology and 8 hours college chemistry. Applying the sciences of biology, chemistry, statistics, and environmental engineering to the field of public health. Public health epidemiology and disease control concepts related to the anticipation, recognition, assessment, and control of common public health disease problems.

  • Electives 15 credit hours
  • Cognate/elective 4 credit hours
  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours

Subtotal: 31 Hours

 

Total hours in program: 120

 

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Environmental Sustainability and Technology, B.S., Academic Map 

Dr. Carol Boraiko
Associate Professor
carol.boraiko@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Kathy Mathis
Associate Professor
kathy.mathis@mtsu.edu

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Environmental Science and Technology

EST 2810 - Introduction to Environmental Science
3 credit hours

The technical, economic, and political aspects of environmental science. Introduction to specific problems dealing with many pollution issues. Specific monitoring, abatement techniques, and equipment. An overview of energy production processes, industrial pollution problems, air, noise, solid and hazardous wastes, along with economic and environmental concerns. Field trips, lecture, and research projects and/or papers highlight specific topics of special interest to students.

EST 4760 - Seminar in Environmental Science and Technology
1 credit hour credit

Prerequisite: Permission of department. Student presentations on capstone projects. Incorporates guest speakers, readings, reflective thought, career and job search, and discussions on environmental issues.

EST 4770 - Pollution Control Technology
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: 8 hours each in biology, chemistry, and physics, or consent of instructor. Solid waste and water pollution control technology. Legislative regulations and quality standards, pollution types and sources, detection and analysis instruments, and treatment or abatement principles and practices.

EST 4780 - Air, Solids, and Noise Pollution Technology
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: 8 hours each chemistry, biology, and physics or permission of instructor. Air, noise, solid and hazardous waste pollution technology, including legislative regulations and quality standards: sources, detection, and analysis instrumentation and practices, and treatment and abatement principles, equipment, and practices.

EST 4810 - Energy and the Environment
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: 4 hours chemistry and 3 hours mathematics or consent of instructor. Sources and methods of energy production and classifications of energy usages, with emphasis on usage trends, energy conservation strategies, and alternate energy utilization.

EST 4820 - Solar Building Design
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: 4 hours science and 3 hours mathematics or consent of instructor. Broad introduction to the environmental and economic impact of solar energy for residential and light industrial construction including day lighting, passive solar design, and hot water heating.

EST 4840 - Energy Auditing
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: 4 hours chemistry and 3 hours mathematics or consent of instructor. Types of energy consumption and classifications of energy usages, with emphasis on conservation strategies and total management for residential and industrial plants.

EST 4980 - Environmental Public Health
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: 8 hours college biology and 8 hours college chemistry. Applying the sciences of biology, chemistry, statistics, and environmental engineering to the field of public health. Public health epidemiology and disease control concepts related to the anticipation, recognition, assessment, and control of common public health disease problems.

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