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Mathematics

The foundations of our high-tech society rest on mathematics and problem solving.  Every laptop, every smartphone, and every video game console rely on mathematics. Exploring and understanding the world in which we live is a matter of mathematical inquiry and discovery.  With a major in Mathematics and a degree from MTSU, a student will have the keys to open doors of employment or further study in many areas, including science, statistics, business, finance, insurance, health, education, and the technologies of tomorrow.

Doing the math

Jacob Basham knows better than most how the study of mathematics can prove vital to the pursuit of a career in another field. A McNair Scholar and first-generation college student pursuing a degree in Professional Mathematics, Basham has been accepted to medical school at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Medicine for their dual M.D. /Ph.D. program. For him, math was just the beginning. “My career goals hover around becoming a physician in translational medicine and clinical research,” Basham says. “I want to be at the places where new treatments are being researched and our most deadly diseases are being eradicated.”

The third “R”

Alex Murphy, a Noyce Scholarship recipient, is preparing to be a teacher of secondary mathematics. He has been doing research since his sophomore year when he became interested in understanding how pre-service teachers construct their knowledge of mathematics. His senior honors thesis was a case study reviewing his development of both mathematical and pedagogical metacognition in order to construct a reflective model that other pre-service mathematics teachers could follow. "The mathematics I know is a living knowledge that has blended very naturally with my ability to communicate it. This study has challenged me to remain a lifelong learner—especially with graduation so close," Murphy said. In addition to being a scholar, Alex does volunteer work at orphanages in Haiti during summer breaks.

A degree in Mathematics from MTSU is a sure way to transform being a problem solver into a fulfilling, always-in-demand career. Examples of potential positions include

  • Actuary
  • Astrophysicist
  • College professor
  • Computer programmer
  • Controller
  • Database manager
  • Demographer
  • Information scientist
  • Inventory control specialist
  • Investment researcher
  • Mathematical modeler
  • Mathematical technician
  • Mathematician
  • Mathematics Teacher
  • Psychometrist
  • Statistician
  • Systems analyst
  • Technical writer

Employers of MTSU alumni include

  • Bedford County Schools
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield of Tennessee
  • Bryan, Pendleton, Swats & McAllister, LLC
  • Caterpillar Finance
  • Cigna
  • Columbia State Community College
  • David Lipscomb University
  • Direct General Group of Companies
  • Grundy County Schools
  • Humana Inc.
  • Motlow State Community College
  • Nashville State Community College
  • Rutherford County Schools
  • Select Actuarial Services
  • Tennessee Tech University
  • U.S. Army
  • Volunteer State Community College
  • Walters State Community College
  • Wilson County Schools
  • Willis North America Inc.

Undergraduate students interested in mathematical modeling and problem solving can pursue a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree with a major in Mathematics, choosing one of three concentrations: Actuarial Science, Mathematics Education, or Professional Mathematics.

Undergraduate minors are available in three areas: Mathematics; Statistics; and Mathematics for Managerial, Social, and Life Sciences. 

For graduate students, the Department of Mathematical Sciences offers a Master of Science (M.S.) degree with a major in Mathematics and concentrations in General Mathematics, Industrial Mathematics, and Research Preparation.

A Master of Science in Teaching (M.S.T.) degree with a major in Mathematics is also available, with concentrations in Middle Grade Mathematics and Secondary Mathematics.

The Master of Science in Professional Science (M.S.P.S.) offers concentrations in Actuarial Science and Biostatistics.

A graduate minor in Mathematics is also offered.

Actuarial Science Mathematics Education Professional Mathematics Advanced Professional Mathematics Business Professional Mathematics General Professional Mathematics Industrial Professional Mathematics Statistics 


Mathematics, Actuarial Science Concentration, B.S.

Department of Mathematical Sciences 
615-898-2669
Don Hong, program coordinator
Don.Hong@mtsu.edu

A major in Mathematics requires the mathematics core of 21 hours plus 15 hours of specified upper-level courses in the department and at least 12 hours of supporting coursework (either in or out of the department). The supporting coursework must complement the student's program and be approved by the advisor.

Each Mathematics major is required to complete MATH 4990. All courses in the Mathematics major or minor (including supporting coursework) must be completed with a grade of C (2.00) or better. All courses transferred from other institutions for credit in the Mathematics major or minor must carry a grade of C (2.00) or better and be approved by the department chair.

The Actuarial Science concentration is designed for students who have a strong mathematical ability with an interest in applying their mathematical knowledge to insurance, finance, risk management, investments, and other areas of business. The program is classified by the Society of Actuaries (SOA) as an Advanced Undergraduate Actuarial Science program and is in complete compliance with the requirements set forth by the Society of Actuaries and the Casualty Actuarial Society (CAS) in the Year 2000 Syllabus and beyond. Therefore, the student can choose coursework necessary to prepare for the SOA/CAS Course/Exams 1 through 4 and SOA Course 6.

Mathematics majors preparing for the actuarial examination series and an actuarial science career should complete this professional program in Actuarial Science. The program requires that the student complete the mathematics core; upper-division actuarial science courses consisting of ACSI 4140, ACSI 4220, ACSI 4230, ACSI 4330, and two elective courses chosen from ACSI 4240, ACSI 4340, ACSI 4630, ACSI 4640 and STAT 4200; and supporting coursework consisting of STAT 4190 and STAT 4320 and MATH 4990. The student is required to complete ACTG 3000, ECON 2410, ECON 2420, and FIN 3610. A minor from the Jennings A. Jones College of Business is required. A minor in Insurance is strongly suggested. A Computer Science or Information Systems elective and CSCI 1170 are required.

The following specialized courses do not count toward a Mathematics major or minor: MATH 1010, MATH 1410, MATH 1420, MATH 1530, MATH 1630, MATH 1710, MATH 1720, MATH 1730, MATH 1810, and MATH 4010. However, MATH 1630, MATH 1730, and MATH 1810 may count toward a minor in Mathematics for Managerial, Social, and Life Sciences.

Mathematics Core (21 hours)

Each student majoring in the department must complete the following core (21 hours):

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  MATH credit hours  

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1920 - Calculus II  MATH credit hours  

    MATH 1920 - Calculus II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. A topics course providing a wide view of different techniques and applications of calculus in the plane. Techniques of integration and applications of integration fully developed. Power series and Taylor series included. Emphasis on multidisciplinary applications includes Taylor series approximation; applications of integration to physics, biology, and business; and geometric and power series applications. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 2010 - Elements of Linear Algebra

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. Vectors and vector spaces, matrices and systems of linear equations, geometry of vector spaces and linear transformations in a vector space.

  • MATH 3110 - Calculus III  MATH credit hours  

    MATH 3110 - Calculus III

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. Adjusts calculus techniques developed in the plane (Calculus I and II) to make them applicable in three-dimensional space. Introductory study of the nature of three-dimensional space and definition of the algebraic calculations in three-dimensional space. Differential and integral calculus definitions and techniques revised to appropriately transfer into this new space. Topics include multivariate functions, partial differentiation, partial integration, multiple integration, and multidisciplinary applications.

  • MATH 3460 - Foundation of Higher Mathematics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. The language of mathematics, set theory and proof, relations and functions, number systems, mathematical structures. Focuses on the transition from lower-division study to upper-division study by actively engaging the student in problem solving, mathematical reasoning, and both informal and technical writing.

 

  • MATH 2050 - Probability and Statistics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Calculus I. Data analysis, probability, and statistical inference. The inference material covers means, proportions, and variances for one and two samples, one-way ANOVA, regression and correlation, and chi-square analysis.

  • STAT 3150 - Mathematical Statistics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Two semesters of calculus. Probability theory including basic probability laws, properties of distributions, mathematical expectation, special discrete and continuous distributions, functions of random variables, and selected applications.

NOTE:

Students with a major in Actuarial Science may substitute STAT 3150 for MATH 2010 and MATH 2050; and ACSI 4200 for MATH 3460.

Curriculum: Mathematics, Actuarial Science

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories. 

Students should consult their advisors each semester to plan their schedules.

Freshman

 

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  MATH credit hours  (Math)

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1920 - Calculus II  MATH credit hours  

    MATH 1920 - Calculus II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. A topics course providing a wide view of different techniques and applications of calculus in the plane. Techniques of integration and applications of integration fully developed. Power series and Taylor series included. Emphasis on multidisciplinary applications includes Taylor series approximation; applications of integration to physics, biology, and business; and geometric and power series applications. Graphing calculator required.

  • CSCI 1170 - Computer Science I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Sufficient background in algebra and trigonometry. The first of a two-semester sequence using a high-level language; language constructs and simple data structures such as arrays and strings. Emphasis on problem solving using the language and principles of structured software development. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours.

  • Natural Sciences (2 prefixes) 8 credit hours
  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours

Subtotal: 29 Hours

 

Sophomore

 

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours
  • MATH 3110 - Calculus III  MATH credit hours  

    MATH 3110 - Calculus III

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. Adjusts calculus techniques developed in the plane (Calculus I and II) to make them applicable in three-dimensional space. Introductory study of the nature of three-dimensional space and definition of the algebraic calculations in three-dimensional space. Differential and integral calculus definitions and techniques revised to appropriately transfer into this new space. Topics include multivariate functions, partial differentiation, partial integration, multiple integration, and multidisciplinary applications.

 

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

 

  • ECON 2410 - Principles of Economics, Macroeconomics

    3 credit hours

    As an aid to understanding modern economic society: economic concepts of national income and its fluctuations, inflation, unemployment, role of the banking system, monetary and fiscal policies, and international topics.

  • ECON 2420 - Principles of Economics, Microeconomics

    3 credit hours

    As an aid to understanding modern economic society: economic concepts of consumer and firm behavior; the pricing of goods, services, and productive factors; international topics; and an overview of the American economy.

  • ACSI 4200 - Introduction to Mathematics of Investment

    3 credit hours

    (Same as MATH 4200.) Prerequisites: MATH 1910 and one semester of probability/statistics; or consent of instructor. Calculus and probability/statistics used to model and analyze investments in bonds, treasury bills, stocks, and other derivatives. Topics include obtaining the price of a bond as a function of interest rate, developing formulas for duration and convexity to study the sensitivity of price to interest rate, and mathematical modeling of investor preference and attitude toward risk.

  • ACSI 4220 - Mathematics of Pricing Theory

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ACSI 4200/MATH 4200 and ECON 2410, ECON 2420; or consent of instructor. Applies calculus and theory of interest tools to intermediate topics in microeconomics. Topics include mathematics of supply, demand, and equilibrium; prices, costs, and the gains from trade; consumer behavior; elasticities; competition; monopoly; market power, collusion, and oligopoly; the mathematics of risk and uncertainty; and surplus economics. For students in Actuarial Science, a preparatory course for the Society of Actuaries/Casualty Actuarial Society Course/Exam 2.

Choose 6 hours from:

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 31 Hours

 

Junior

 

  • STAT 3150 - Mathematical Statistics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Two semesters of calculus. Probability theory including basic probability laws, properties of distributions, mathematical expectation, special discrete and continuous distributions, functions of random variables, and selected applications.

  • STAT 4190 - Mathematical Statistics II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: STAT 3150 or equivalent. Theory of statistical inference. Topics include sampling distributions, decision theory, estimation, test of hypothesis, regression analysis, analysis of variance, and selected applications.

  • ACSI 4140 - Mathematical Foundations of Actuarial Science

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: MATH 3020 (or MATH 3110) and STAT 3150; or consent of instructor. Integrates calculus, probability, and risk management topics into fundamental tools for assessing risk in an actuarial environment. Calculus and probability topics include derivatives, integrals, partials, random variables, distributions, and conditional probability. Risk topics include frequency and severity. Insurance concepts such as retention, deductible, coinsurance, and risk premiums. For students in Actuarial Science, a preparatory course for the Society of Actuaries/Casualty Actuarial Society Course/Exam 1.

  • ACSI 4230 - Mathematics of Compound Interest

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ACSI 4200/MATH 4200 or consent of instructor. For students in Actuarial Science, offers preparation for the Society of Actuaries/Casualty Actuarial Society Exam 2. Topics include measurement of interest (including accumulated and present value factors), annuities certain, yield rates, amortization schedules, sinking funds, and bonds and related securities.

  • ACSI 4330 - Actuarial Mathematics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ACSI 4230 and STAT 4190; or consent of instructor. First of a two-semester sequence; offers preparation for the Society of Actuaries/Casualty Actuarial Society Course/Exam 3. Topics include survival distributions and life tables, life insurance, life annuities, and net premiums.

  • ACTG 3000 - Survey of Accounting for General Business

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: A college-level math course; ENGL 1010; sophomore standing. Accounting cycle given minor emphasis; financial statement analysis and managerial uses of accounting given major emphasis. May be used for general business minors or M.B.A. candidates who have had no previous accounting courses. (Not open to Accounting majors and students with credit in ACTG 2110 and ACTG 2120.)

  • FIN 3610 - General Insurance  3 credit hours  

    FIN 3610 - General Insurance

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Junior standing and admission into the College of Business. The principles of risk and risk bearing; insurance carriers; survey of principles of life, health and accident, fire, marine, and automobile insurance policies; government regulation of insurance.

  • Elective 3 credit hours
  • Minor 3 credit hours
  • CSCI/INFS elective 3 credit hours (approved by advisor)

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Senior

 

  • STAT 4320 - Probability and Stochastic Processes

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Two semesters of calculus and STAT 3150 (or MATH 2050) or consent of instructor. Theoretical basis for stochastic processes and their use as models of real-world phenomena. Topics include Markov chains, Poisson processes, Brownian motion and stationary processes. Applications include Gambler's Ruin, birth and death models, hitting times, stock option pricing, and the Black-Scholes model.

  • MATH 4990 - Seminar in Mathematics

    3 credit hours

    Open only to Mathematics majors; normally taken during last regular semester of coursework. Required of all Mathematics majors. Offers graduating Mathematics majors a broad perspective of mathematics, mathematical activity, and problem solving in various areas of application; offers preparation for professional examinations; acquaints students with job possibilities and aids in career decisions; acquaints students with the nature of graduate study in mathematics. Pass/Fail.

  • STAT/ACSI electives 6 credit hours
  • Minor courses 12 credit hours
  • Electives 3 credit hours
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Total hours in program: 120

 

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Mathematics, Actuarial Science, B.S., Academic Map 

 

 

 


Mathematics, Mathematics Education Concentration, B.S.

Department of Mathematical Sciences 
615-898-2669
Michael Beck, program coordinator
Michael.Beck@mtsu.edu

A major in Mathematics requires the mathematics core of 21 hours plus 15 hours of specified upper-level courses in the department and at least 12 hours of supporting coursework (either in or out of the department). The supporting coursework must complement the student's program and be approved by the mathematics advisor. A single minor outside the department is required.

Each Mathematics major is required to declare a concentration. Concentrations include Professional Mathematics, Mathematics Education, and Actuarial Science.

Each Mathematics major is required to complete the Seminar in Mathematics, MATH 4990. All courses in the Mathematics major or minor (including supporting coursework) must be completed with a grade of C (2.00) or better. All courses transferred from other institutions for credit in the Mathematics major or minor must carry a grade of C (2.00) or better and be approved by the department chair.

Students preparing to teach mathematics at the secondary level (grades 7-12) must complete the major in Mathematics with a concentration in Mathematics Education. In addition to the mathematics core, they must take as upper-division coursework MATH 3070, MATH 4510, MATH 4620, MATH 4990, and one elective in the department. Supporting coursework consists of MATH 3320, MATH 3330, MATH 4540, CSCI 1160, and MATH 4740 . A minor in Secondary Education through  MTeach is required. Students seeking state licensure must also pass all applicable portions of the Praxis Series Exams, developed and administered by the Educational Testing Service. For the latest information regarding these exams contact the Office of Testing Services (898-2863). To complete their programs of study in a timely manner, students must consult their major and minor advisors each semester.

The following specialized courses do not count toward a Mathematics major or minor: MATH 1010, MATH 1410, MATH 1420, MATH 1530, MATH 1630, MATH 1710, MATH 1720, MATH 1730, MATH 1810, and MATH 4010. However, MATH 1630, MATH 1730, and MATH 1810 may count toward a minor in Mathematics for Managerial, Social, and Life Sciences.

Mathematics Core (21 hours)

Each student majoring in the department must complete the following core (21 hours):

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  MATH credit hours  

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1920 - Calculus II  MATH credit hours  

    MATH 1920 - Calculus II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. A topics course providing a wide view of different techniques and applications of calculus in the plane. Techniques of integration and applications of integration fully developed. Power series and Taylor series included. Emphasis on multidisciplinary applications includes Taylor series approximation; applications of integration to physics, biology, and business; and geometric and power series applications. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 2010 - Elements of Linear Algebra

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. Vectors and vector spaces, matrices and systems of linear equations, geometry of vector spaces and linear transformations in a vector space.

  • MATH 3110 - Calculus III  MATH credit hours  

    MATH 3110 - Calculus III

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. Adjusts calculus techniques developed in the plane (Calculus I and II) to make them applicable in three-dimensional space. Introductory study of the nature of three-dimensional space and definition of the algebraic calculations in three-dimensional space. Differential and integral calculus definitions and techniques revised to appropriately transfer into this new space. Topics include multivariate functions, partial differentiation, partial integration, multiple integration, and multidisciplinary applications.

  • MATH 3460 - Foundation of Higher Mathematics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. The language of mathematics, set theory and proof, relations and functions, number systems, mathematical structures. Focuses on the transition from lower-division study to upper-division study by actively engaging the student in problem solving, mathematical reasoning, and both informal and technical writing.

 

  • MATH 2050 - Probability and Statistics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Calculus I. Data analysis, probability, and statistical inference. The inference material covers means, proportions, and variances for one and two samples, one-way ANOVA, regression and correlation, and chi-square analysis.

  • STAT 3150 - Mathematical Statistics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Two semesters of calculus. Probability theory including basic probability laws, properties of distributions, mathematical expectation, special discrete and continuous distributions, functions of random variables, and selected applications.

Curriculum: Mathematics, Mathematics Education

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

Freshman

 

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  MATH credit hours  (Math)

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1920 - Calculus II  MATH credit hours  

    MATH 1920 - Calculus II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. A topics course providing a wide view of different techniques and applications of calculus in the plane. Techniques of integration and applications of integration fully developed. Power series and Taylor series included. Emphasis on multidisciplinary applications includes Taylor series approximation; applications of integration to physics, biology, and business; and geometric and power series applications. Graphing calculator required.

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours
  • Natural Sciences (2 prefixes) 8 credit hours
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours
  • MSE 1010 - Step 1: Inquiry Approaches to Teaching

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite: An interest in exploring teaching. Readings, discussions, and activities associated with the planning and instruction of inquiry-based mathematics and/or science lessons. Includes field-based teaching.

  • MSE 2010 - Step 2: Inquiry Lesson Design  1 credit hour credit hours  

    MSE 2010 - Step 2: Inquiry Lesson Design

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite: MSE 1010. Builds on the lesson design skills developed in MSE 1010. Readings, discussions, and activities associated with the planning and instruction of inquiry-based mathematics or science lessons in the middle school. Includes field-based teaching.

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Sophomore

 

  • MATH 2010 - Elements of Linear Algebra

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. Vectors and vector spaces, matrices and systems of linear equations, geometry of vector spaces and linear transformations in a vector space.

  • MATH 2050 - Probability and Statistics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Calculus I. Data analysis, probability, and statistical inference. The inference material covers means, proportions, and variances for one and two samples, one-way ANOVA, regression and correlation, and chi-square analysis.

  • MATH 3110 - Calculus III  MATH credit hours  

    MATH 3110 - Calculus III

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. Adjusts calculus techniques developed in the plane (Calculus I and II) to make them applicable in three-dimensional space. Introductory study of the nature of three-dimensional space and definition of the algebraic calculations in three-dimensional space. Differential and integral calculus definitions and techniques revised to appropriately transfer into this new space. Topics include multivariate functions, partial differentiation, partial integration, multiple integration, and multidisciplinary applications.

  • MATH 3460 - Foundation of Higher Mathematics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. The language of mathematics, set theory and proof, relations and functions, number systems, mathematical structures. Focuses on the transition from lower-division study to upper-division study by actively engaging the student in problem solving, mathematical reasoning, and both informal and technical writing.

  • CSCI 1160 - Introduction to Computing: A Multimedia Approach

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Sufficient background in algebra. Computer science concepts and computer software development using a multimedia approach to program development. Algorithms, programming, and documentation of media computation problems including modifying, editing, and creating picture and sound files. Explores computer science hardware and software terminology. Counts toward a Computer Science major or minor upon successful completion with a grade of A or B and approval by Computer Science chair. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours.

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

 

  • YOED 3520 - Knowing and Learning in Science and Mathematics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: MSE 1010 and MSE 2010. Focuses on issues of what it means to learn and know science and mathematics. Included are topics related to standards of knowing and understanding powerful ideas in mathematics and science, links between knowing and developing in learning theory, and the content and evolution of scientific ideas. Students required to conduct interviews with public school practitioners.  

  • YOED 3550 - Classroom Interactions in Mathematics and Science

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: YOED 3520. Continues the process of preparing candidates to teach mathematics and science in upper elementary and secondary settings and to learn how content and pedagogy combine to make effective teaching. Focuses on building awareness and understanding of equity issues and their effects on learning.  

  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours

Subtotal: 32 Hours

 

Junior

 

  • MATH 3070 - College Geometry  3 credit hours  

    MATH 3070 - College Geometry

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 3460. Advanced treatment of standard topics in Euclidean geometry using informal and axiomatic approaches. Includes proofmaking techniques, traditional and transformational geometry, finite geometries, and a brief introduction to other geometries.

  • MATH 3320 - Teaching Mathematics in Grades 5-8

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Admission to the teacher education program. Required of all Mathematics majors seeking a license to teach mathematics in grades 7-12. Strongly encouraged for elementary education majors with a 5-8 emphasis. Topics from number relationships, mental computation and estimation strategies, patterns and functions, algebra, statistics, probability, geometry, and measurement. Must be taken prior to student teaching.

  • MATH 4510 - Abstract Algebra I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 3460. An introduction to groups, with a brief introduction to rings, integral domains, and fields.

  • MATH 4620 - History and Philosophy of Mathematics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 3460. Background in geometry and number theory helpful. The character of mathematical thought by way of mathematical problems that have occupied the outstanding mathematicians of Babylon, Egypt, Greece, China, the Renaissance, and modern times paralleled with a study of three schools of mathematical philosophy: intuitionism, logicism, and formalism.

  • MATH 4540 - Topics in Secondary School Mathematics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education, completion of the mathematics core, MATH 3070 and MATH 4510. Required of all Mathematics majors seeking a license to teach mathematics in grades 7-12. Examines in greater depth topics to which the student has prior exposure; emphasizes the relevance and applications of these topics to the pre-college level classroom.

  • MATH elective 3 credit hours (approved by advisor)
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours
  • MATH 4740 - Research Methods  3 credit hours  

    MATH 4740 - Research Methods

    3 credit hours

    (Same as BIOL/CHEM/PHYS 4740.) Prerequisite: YOED 3520. Provides secondary science and mathematics teacher candidates with the tools that scientists use to solve scientific problems. Students will use these tools in a laboratory setting, communicate findings, and understand how scientists develop new knowledge.

Choose 6 hours from:

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 33 Hours

 

Senior

 

  • MATH 3330 - Teaching Mathematics in Grades 9-12

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education, completion of the mathematics core, and MATH 3320. Required of all Mathematics majors seeking a license to teach mathematics in grades 7-12. In-depth study of mathematics learning and teaching strategies in secondary school mathematics. Selected topics from junior and senior high school curricula provide a foundation for student investigations into the conceptual nature of mathematics and applications in the secondary school curriculum. Must be taken prior to student teaching.

  • MATH 4990 - Seminar in Mathematics

    3 credit hours

    Open only to Mathematics majors; normally taken during last regular semester of coursework. Required of all Mathematics majors. Offers graduating Mathematics majors a broad perspective of mathematics, mathematical activity, and problem solving in various areas of application; offers preparation for professional examinations; acquaints students with job possibilities and aids in career decisions; acquaints students with the nature of graduate study in mathematics. Pass/Fail.

  • YOED 4040 - Residency I: MTeach

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education program; successful completion of YOED 3520 and YOED 3550; overall grade point average maintained at a minimum of 2.75; grade point average in the major at a minimum of 2.5; and senior standing. A school-based clinical experience in a problem-based learning format in biology, chemistry, mathematics, or physics education.

    NOTE: All students must obtain a grade of B or better in this course to move forward to Residency II.

  • YOED 4050 - Project-Based Instruction in Mathematics and Science

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Admission to the MTeach Program (Mathematics and Science majors only). Readings, discussions, and activities associated with the planning and instruction of inquiry-based STEM lessons. Field-based teaching, including out-of-school research and instructional settings.  

  • YOED 4400 - Residency II  12 credit hours  

    YOED 4400 - Residency II

    12 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education program; successful completion (with grade of B or better) of YOED 2500, YOED 3000, YOED 3300, YOED 4020,YOED 4030, or YOED 4040; passing score(s) on the specialty area exam(s) of Praxis II; overall grade point average maintained at a minimum of 2.75; grade point average in the major at a minimum of 2.50; and senior standing. A full-day, full-semester supervised teaching experience in a public school classroom. Pass/Fail grading.

Subtotal: 25 Hours

 

Total hours in program: 120

 

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Mathematics, Mathematics Education, B.S., Academic Map  


Mathematics, Professional Mathematics Concentration (Advanced Mathematics), B.S.

Department of Mathematical Sciences 
615-898-2669
Don Nelson, program coordinator
Donald.Nelson@mtsu.edu

 

A major in Mathematics requires the mathematics core of 21 hours plus 15 hours of specified upper-level courses in the department and at least 12 hours of supporting coursework (either in or out of the department). The supporting coursework must complement the student's program and be approved by the mathematics advisor.

Each Mathematics major is required to declare a concentration. Concentrations include Professional Mathematics, Mathematics Education, and Actuarial Science.

Each Mathematics major is required to complete the Seminar in Mathematics, MATH 4990. All courses in the Mathematics major or minor (including supporting coursework) must be completed with a grade of C (2.00) or better. All courses transferred from other institutions for credit in the Mathematics major or minor must carry a grade of C (2.00) or better and be approved by the department chair.

Students opting to study the discipline of mathematics will choose between tracks in general mathematics, advanced mathematics, business, statistics, and industrial mathematics. In addition to the mathematics core, they will take 9 additional upper-level courses in the department chosen with the approval of the mathematics advisor. A single minor outside of the department and CSCI 1170 are required.

The following specialized courses do not count toward a Mathematics major or minor: MATH 1010, MATH 1410, MATH 1420, MATH 1530, MATH 1630, MATH 1710, MATH 1720, MATH 1730, MATH 1810, and MATH 4010. However, MATH 1630, MATH 1730, and MATH 1810 may count toward a minor in Mathematics for Managerial, Social, and Life Sciences.

Advanced Mathematics Track

Students interested in preparing for a graduate degree in mathematics should pursue this track. In addition to the mathematics core, they must take MATH 3120, MATH 4250, MATH 4510; two courses from MATH 3260, MATH 4230, MATH 4270, MATH 4420, MATH 4530, MATH 4700; and 9 hours of approved supporting coursework chosen from among upper-level courses in the department. The program must include at least one sequence in either algebra (MATH 4420/MATH 4510), analysis (MATH 4230-MATH 4250), or differential equations (MATH 3120-MATH 3260). Six hours of a foreign language are recommended.

Mathematics Core (21 hours)

Each student majoring in the department must complete the following core (21 hours):

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  MATH credit hours  

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1920 - Calculus II  MATH credit hours  

    MATH 1920 - Calculus II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. A topics course providing a wide view of different techniques and applications of calculus in the plane. Techniques of integration and applications of integration fully developed. Power series and Taylor series included. Emphasis on multidisciplinary applications includes Taylor series approximation; applications of integration to physics, biology, and business; and geometric and power series applications. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 2010 - Elements of Linear Algebra

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. Vectors and vector spaces, matrices and systems of linear equations, geometry of vector spaces and linear transformations in a vector space.

  • MATH 3110 - Calculus III  MATH credit hours  

    MATH 3110 - Calculus III

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. Adjusts calculus techniques developed in the plane (Calculus I and II) to make them applicable in three-dimensional space. Introductory study of the nature of three-dimensional space and definition of the algebraic calculations in three-dimensional space. Differential and integral calculus definitions and techniques revised to appropriately transfer into this new space. Topics include multivariate functions, partial differentiation, partial integration, multiple integration, and multidisciplinary applications.

  • MATH 3460 - Foundation of Higher Mathematics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. The language of mathematics, set theory and proof, relations and functions, number systems, mathematical structures. Focuses on the transition from lower-division study to upper-division study by actively engaging the student in problem solving, mathematical reasoning, and both informal and technical writing.

 

  • MATH 2050 - Probability and Statistics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Calculus I. Data analysis, probability, and statistical inference. The inference material covers means, proportions, and variances for one and two samples, one-way ANOVA, regression and correlation, and chi-square analysis.

  • STAT 3150 - Mathematical Statistics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Two semesters of calculus. Probability theory including basic probability laws, properties of distributions, mathematical expectation, special discrete and continuous distributions, functions of random variables, and selected applications.

Curriculum: Mathematics, Professional Mathematics (Advanced Mathematics)

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

Students should consult their advisors each semester to plan their schedules.

Freshman

 

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  MATH credit hours  (Math)

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1920 - Calculus II  MATH credit hours  

    MATH 1920 - Calculus II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. A topics course providing a wide view of different techniques and applications of calculus in the plane. Techniques of integration and applications of integration fully developed. Power series and Taylor series included. Emphasis on multidisciplinary applications includes Taylor series approximation; applications of integration to physics, biology, and business; and geometric and power series applications. Graphing calculator required.

  • CSCI 1170 - Computer Science I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Sufficient background in algebra and trigonometry. The first of a two-semester sequence using a high-level language; language constructs and simple data structures such as arrays and strings. Emphasis on problem solving using the language and principles of structured software development. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours.

  • Natural Sciences 4 credit hours
  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours

 

  • MATH 2050 - Probability and Statistics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Calculus I. Data analysis, probability, and statistical inference. The inference material covers means, proportions, and variances for one and two samples, one-way ANOVA, regression and correlation, and chi-square analysis.

  • STAT 3150 - Mathematical Statistics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Two semesters of calculus. Probability theory including basic probability laws, properties of distributions, mathematical expectation, special discrete and continuous distributions, functions of random variables, and selected applications.

 

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 31 Hours

 

Sophomore

 

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • MATH 2010 - Elements of Linear Algebra

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. Vectors and vector spaces, matrices and systems of linear equations, geometry of vector spaces and linear transformations in a vector space.

  • MATH 3110 - Calculus III  MATH credit hours  

    MATH 3110 - Calculus III

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. Adjusts calculus techniques developed in the plane (Calculus I and II) to make them applicable in three-dimensional space. Introductory study of the nature of three-dimensional space and definition of the algebraic calculations in three-dimensional space. Differential and integral calculus definitions and techniques revised to appropriately transfer into this new space. Topics include multivariate functions, partial differentiation, partial integration, multiple integration, and multidisciplinary applications.

  • MATH 3460 - Foundation of Higher Mathematics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. The language of mathematics, set theory and proof, relations and functions, number systems, mathematical structures. Focuses on the transition from lower-division study to upper-division study by actively engaging the student in problem solving, mathematical reasoning, and both informal and technical writing.

  • ACSI/MATH/STAT UD elective 3 credit hours
  • Natural Sciences 4 credit hours
  • Minor or elective courses 6 credit hours

 

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 29 Hours

 

Junior

 

  • MATH 3120 - Differential Equations I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. The solution and application of ordinary differential equations with emphasis on first order equations, second order linear equations, Laplace Transform method, systems of differential equations, and numerical methods.

  • MATH 4510 - Abstract Algebra I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 3460. An introduction to groups, with a brief introduction to rings, integral domains, and fields.

  • Math electives* 6 credit hours
  • Minor or elective courses 6 credit hours
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences (2 prefixes) 6 credit hours
  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours

 

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Senior

 

  • MATH 4250 - Theory of Calculus

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: MATH 3110 and MATH 3460. Theoretical development of limits, continuity, differentiation, and integration in one dimension.

  • MATH 4990 - Seminar in Mathematics

    3 credit hours

    Open only to Mathematics majors; normally taken during last regular semester of coursework. Required of all Mathematics majors. Offers graduating Mathematics majors a broad perspective of mathematics, mathematical activity, and problem solving in various areas of application; offers preparation for professional examinations; acquaints students with job possibilities and aids in career decisions; acquaints students with the nature of graduate study in mathematics. Pass/Fail.

  • ACSI/MATH/STAT UD electives 6 credit hours
  • Minor or elective courses 6 credit hours
  • Electives 12 credit hours

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Total hours in program: 120

 

NOTE:

*Choose one course from MATH 4420, MATH 4230, or MATH 3260 and one course from MATH 4270, MATH 4530, or MATH 4700.

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Mathematics, Professional Mathematics (Advanced), B.S., Academic Map  


Mathematics, Professional Mathematics Concentration (Business), B.S.

Department of Mathematical Sciences 
615-898-2669
Don Nelson, program coordinator
Donald.Nelson@mtsu.edu

A major in Mathematics requires the mathematics core of 21 hours plus 15 hours of specified upper-level courses in the department and at least 12 hours of supporting coursework (either in or out of the department). The supporting coursework must complement the student's program and be approved by the mathematics advisor.

Each Mathematics major is required to declare a concentration. Concentrations include Professional Mathematics, Mathematics Education, and Actuarial Science.

Each Mathematics major is required to complete the Seminar in Mathematics, MATH 4990. All courses in the Mathematics major or minor (including supporting coursework) must be completed with a grade of C (2.00) or better. All courses transferred from other institutions for credit in the Mathematics major or minor must carry a grade of C (2.00) or better and be approved by the department chair.

Students opting to study the discipline of mathematics will choose between tracks in general mathematics, advanced mathematics, business, statistics, and industrial mathematics. In addition to the mathematics core, they will take 9 additional upper-level courses in the department chosen with the approval of the mathematics advisor. A single minor outside of the department and CSCI 1170 are required.

The following specialized courses do not count toward a Mathematics major or minor: MATH 1010, MATH 1410, MATH 1420, MATH 1530, MATH 1630, MATH 1710, MATH 1720, MATH 1730, MATH 1810, and MATH 4010. However, MATH 1630, MATH 1730, MATH 1810, and may count toward a minor in Mathematics for Managerial, Social, and Life Sciences.

Business Track

This track is appropriate for students who seek a broad background from such diverse but mutually supportive areas as mathematics, statistics, computer science, and business. The program offers preparation for the job market or for further study in the more specialized areas of actuarial science, operations research, statistics, computer science, or finance.

In addition to the mathematics core, students pursuing this track must take STAT 4190, ACSI 4200, and either STAT 4200 or STAT 4360. The supporting coursework consists of 11 hours of computer science or information systems courses. The student must complete a minor in the Jennings A. Jones College of Business as well as ACTG 2110 and ACTG 2120 or ACTG 3000 and ECON 2410, ECON 2420.

Mathematics Core (21 hours)

Each student majoring in the department must complete the following core (21 hours):

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  MATH credit hours  

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1920 - Calculus II  MATH credit hours  

    MATH 1920 - Calculus II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. A topics course providing a wide view of different techniques and applications of calculus in the plane. Techniques of integration and applications of integration fully developed. Power series and Taylor series included. Emphasis on multidisciplinary applications includes Taylor series approximation; applications of integration to physics, biology, and business; and geometric and power series applications. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 2010 - Elements of Linear Algebra

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. Vectors and vector spaces, matrices and systems of linear equations, geometry of vector spaces and linear transformations in a vector space.

  • MATH 3110 - Calculus III  MATH credit hours  

    MATH 3110 - Calculus III

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. Adjusts calculus techniques developed in the plane (Calculus I and II) to make them applicable in three-dimensional space. Introductory study of the nature of three-dimensional space and definition of the algebraic calculations in three-dimensional space. Differential and integral calculus definitions and techniques revised to appropriately transfer into this new space. Topics include multivariate functions, partial differentiation, partial integration, multiple integration, and multidisciplinary applications.

  • MATH 3460 - Foundation of Higher Mathematics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. The language of mathematics, set theory and proof, relations and functions, number systems, mathematical structures. Focuses on the transition from lower-division study to upper-division study by actively engaging the student in problem solving, mathematical reasoning, and both informal and technical writing.

 

  • MATH 2050 - Probability and Statistics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Calculus I. Data analysis, probability, and statistical inference. The inference material covers means, proportions, and variances for one and two samples, one-way ANOVA, regression and correlation, and chi-square analysis.

  • STAT 3150 - Mathematical Statistics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Two semesters of calculus. Probability theory including basic probability laws, properties of distributions, mathematical expectation, special discrete and continuous distributions, functions of random variables, and selected applications.

Curriculum: Mathematics, Professional Mathematics (Business)

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

Students should consult their advisors each semester to plan their schedules.

Freshman

 

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  MATH credit hours  (Math)

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1920 - Calculus II  MATH credit hours  

    MATH 1920 - Calculus II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. A topics course providing a wide view of different techniques and applications of calculus in the plane. Techniques of integration and applications of integration fully developed. Power series and Taylor series included. Emphasis on multidisciplinary applications includes Taylor series approximation; applications of integration to physics, biology, and business; and geometric and power series applications. Graphing calculator required.

  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours
  • Natural Sciences 4 credit hours
  • CSCI/INFS/BIA electives 7 credit hours

Subtotal: 31 Hours

 

Sophomore

 

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • MATH 2010 - Elements of Linear Algebra

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. Vectors and vector spaces, matrices and systems of linear equations, geometry of vector spaces and linear transformations in a vector space.

  • MATH 3110 - Calculus III  MATH credit hours  

    MATH 3110 - Calculus III

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. Adjusts calculus techniques developed in the plane (Calculus I and II) to make them applicable in three-dimensional space. Introductory study of the nature of three-dimensional space and definition of the algebraic calculations in three-dimensional space. Differential and integral calculus definitions and techniques revised to appropriately transfer into this new space. Topics include multivariate functions, partial differentiation, partial integration, multiple integration, and multidisciplinary applications.

  • MATH 3460 - Foundation of Higher Mathematics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. The language of mathematics, set theory and proof, relations and functions, number systems, mathematical structures. Focuses on the transition from lower-division study to upper-division study by actively engaging the student in problem solving, mathematical reasoning, and both informal and technical writing.

  • ECON 2410 - Principles of Economics, Macroeconomics

    3 credit hours

    As an aid to understanding modern economic society: economic concepts of national income and its fluctuations, inflation, unemployment, role of the banking system, monetary and fiscal policies, and international topics.

  • ECON 2420 - Principles of Economics, Microeconomics

    3 credit hours

    As an aid to understanding modern economic society: economic concepts of consumer and firm behavior; the pricing of goods, services, and productive factors; international topics; and an overview of the American economy.

  • Natural Sciences 4 credit hours
  • Elective 3 credit hours

 

Choose 6 hours from:

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 32 Hours

 

Junior

 

  • STAT 4190 - Mathematical Statistics II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: STAT 3150 or equivalent. Theory of statistical inference. Topics include sampling distributions, decision theory, estimation, test of hypothesis, regression analysis, analysis of variance, and selected applications.

  • Minor or elective courses 6 credit hours
  • CSCI/INFS/BIA elective 4 credit hours

 

  • STAT 3150 - Mathematical Statistics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Two semesters of calculus. Probability theory including basic probability laws, properties of distributions, mathematical expectation, special discrete and continuous distributions, functions of random variables, and selected applications.

  • MATH 2050 - Probability and Statistics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Calculus I. Data analysis, probability, and statistical inference. The inference material covers means, proportions, and variances for one and two samples, one-way ANOVA, regression and correlation, and chi-square analysis.

 

  • ACSI 4200 - Introduction to Mathematics of Investment

    3 credit hours

    (Same as MATH 4200.) Prerequisites: MATH 1910 and one semester of probability/statistics; or consent of instructor. Calculus and probability/statistics used to model and analyze investments in bonds, treasury bills, stocks, and other derivatives. Topics include obtaining the price of a bond as a function of interest rate, developing formulas for duration and convexity to study the sensitivity of price to interest rate, and mathematical modeling of investor preference and attitude toward risk.

  • MATH 4200 - Introduction to Mathematics of Investment

    3 credit hours

    (Same as ACSI 4200.) Prerequisites: MATH 1910 and one semester of probability/statistics; or consent of instructor. Calculus and probability/statistics used to model and analyze investments in bonds, treasury bills, stocks, and other derivatives. Topics include obtaining the price of a bond as a function of interest rate, developing formulas for duration and convexity to study the sensitivity of price to interest rate, and mathematical modeling of investor preference and attitude toward risk.

 

  • ACTG 3000 - Survey of Accounting for General Business

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: A college-level math course; ENGL 1010; sophomore standing. Accounting cycle given minor emphasis; financial statement analysis and managerial uses of accounting given major emphasis. May be used for general business minors or M.B.A. candidates who have had no previous accounting courses. (Not open to Accounting majors and students with credit in ACTG 2110 and ACTG 2120.)

OR

  • ACTG 2110 - Principles of Accounting I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: A college-level math course; ENGL 1010; sophomore standing. Financial accounting for proprietorships and partnerships with emphasis on the accounting cycle for service and merchandising organizations. Additional topics include accounting for receivables; inventories; property, plant, and equipment; and current liabilities. (Not open to students with credit in ACTG 3000.)

  • ACTG 2120 - Principles of Accounting II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ACTG 2110. A continuation of financial accounting concepts with emphasis on debt and equity structures, the statement of cash flows, and ratio analysis. Managerial accounting topics include job, standard- and activity-based costing, cost/volume/profit (CVP) analysis, and budgeting. (Not open to students with credit in ACTG 2125 or ACTG 3000.) [Same as TBR Community Colleges ACCT 1020.]

 

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

Subtotal: 25 Hours

 

Senior

 

  • STAT 4200 - Statistical Methods for Forecasting

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: STAT 4190. Topics include application of regression models in forecasting and exponential smoothing methods to forecast nonseasonal time-series, seasonal series, and globally constant seasonal models; stochastic time series models; and forecast evaluation.

  • STAT 4360 - Regression Analysis

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 2050 or BIA 3620. Theory and application of regression models. Approaches to model building and data analysis. Computation and interpretation of results facilitated through the use of statistical software packages.

 

  • MATH 4990 - Seminar in Mathematics

    3 credit hours

    Open only to Mathematics majors; normally taken during last regular semester of coursework. Required of all Mathematics majors. Offers graduating Mathematics majors a broad perspective of mathematics, mathematical activity, and problem solving in various areas of application; offers preparation for professional examinations; acquaints students with job possibilities and aids in career decisions; acquaints students with the nature of graduate study in mathematics. Pass/Fail.

  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours
  • Minor or elective courses 12 credit hours
  • Electives 5 credit hours
  • ACSI/STAT electives* 6 credit hours

Subtotal: 32 Hours

 

Total hours in program: 120

 

NOTE:

 *Choose from ACSI 4220, ACSI 4230, ACSI 4630,ACSI 4640, STAT 4320, or STAT 4380.

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Mathematics, Professional Mathematics (Business), B.S., Academic Map  


Mathematics, Professional Mathematics Concentration (General Mathematics), B.S.

Department of Mathematical Sciences 
615-898-2669
Don Nelson, program coordinator
Donald.Nelson@mtsu.edu

A major in Mathematics requires the mathematics core of 21 hours plus 15 hours of specified upper-level courses in the department and at least 12 hours of supporting coursework (either in or out of the department). The supporting coursework must complement the student's program and be approved by the mathematics advisor.

Each Mathematics major is required to declare a concentration. Concentrations include Professional Mathematics, Mathematics Education, and Actuarial Science.

Each Mathematics major is required to complete the Seminar in Mathematics, MATH 4990. All courses in the Mathematics major or minor (including supporting coursework) must be completed with a grade of C (2.00) or better. All courses transferred from other institutions for credit in the Mathematics major or minor must carry a grade of C (2.00) or better and be approved by the department chair.

Students opting to study the discipline of mathematics will choose between tracks in general mathematics, advanced mathematics, business, statistics, and industrial mathematics. In addition to the mathematics core, they will take 9 additional upper-level courses in the department chosen with the approval of the mathematics advisor. A single minor outside of the department and CSCI 1170 are required.

The following specialized courses do not count toward a Mathematics major or minor: MATH 1010, MATH 1410, MATH 1420, MATH 1530, MATH 1630, MATH 1710, MATH 1720, MATH 1730, MATH 1810,and MATH 4010. However, MATH 1630, MATH 1730, MATH 1810, and may count toward a minor in Mathematics for Managerial, Social, and Life Sciences.

General Mathematics Track

Students desiring a broad general background in mathematics should pursue this track. In addition to the mathematics core, they must take MATH 3120, MATH 4510; three additional courses from MATH 3260, MATH 4230, MATH 4250, MATH 4270, MATH 4310, MATH 4320, MATH 4420, MATH 4530, MATH 4700 and STAT 3150, STAT 4190; and 9 hours of approved supporting coursework chosen from among upper-level courses in the department.

Mathematics Core (21 hours)

Each student majoring in the department must complete the following core (21 hours)

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1920 - Calculus II  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1920 - Calculus II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. A topics course providing a wide view of different techniques and applications of calculus in the plane. Techniques of integration and applications of integration fully developed. Power series and Taylor series included. Emphasis on multidisciplinary applications includes Taylor series approximation; applications of integration to physics, biology, and business; and geometric and power series applications. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 2010 - Elements of Linear Algebra

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. Vectors and vector spaces, matrices and systems of linear equations, geometry of vector spaces and linear transformations in a vector space.

  • MATH 3110 - Calculus III  4 credit hours  

    MATH 3110 - Calculus III

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. Adjusts calculus techniques developed in the plane (Calculus I and II) to make them applicable in three-dimensional space. Introductory study of the nature of three-dimensional space and definition of the algebraic calculations in three-dimensional space. Differential and integral calculus definitions and techniques revised to appropriately transfer into this new space. Topics include multivariate functions, partial differentiation, partial integration, multiple integration, and multidisciplinary applications.

  • MATH 3460 - Foundation of Higher Mathematics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. The language of mathematics, set theory and proof, relations and functions, number systems, mathematical structures. Focuses on the transition from lower-division study to upper-division study by actively engaging the student in problem solving, mathematical reasoning, and both informal and technical writing.

  • MATH 2050 - Probability and Statistics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Calculus I. Data analysis, probability, and statistical inference. The inference material covers means, proportions, and variances for one and two samples, one-way ANOVA, regression and correlation, and chi-square analysis.

  • STAT 3150 - Mathematical Statistics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Two semesters of calculus. Probability theory including basic probability laws, properties of distributions, mathematical expectation, special discrete and continuous distributions, functions of random variables, and selected applications.

Curriculum: Mathematics, Professional Mathematics (General Mathematics)

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

Students should consult their advisors each semester to plan their schedules.

Freshman

 

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  (Math)

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1920 - Calculus II  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1920 - Calculus II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. A topics course providing a wide view of different techniques and applications of calculus in the plane. Techniques of integration and applications of integration fully developed. Power series and Taylor series included. Emphasis on multidisciplinary applications includes Taylor series approximation; applications of integration to physics, biology, and business; and geometric and power series applications. Graphing calculator required.

  • CSCI 1170 - Computer Science I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Sufficient background in algebra and trigonometry. The first of a two-semester sequence using a high-level language; language constructs and simple data structures such as arrays and strings. Emphasis on problem solving using the language and principles of structured software development. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours.

  • Natural Sciences 4 credit hours
  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours

 

  • MATH 2050 - Probability and Statistics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Calculus I. Data analysis, probability, and statistical inference. The inference material covers means, proportions, and variances for one and two samples, one-way ANOVA, regression and correlation, and chi-square analysis.

  • STAT 3150 - Mathematical Statistics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Two semesters of calculus. Probability theory including basic probability laws, properties of distributions, mathematical expectation, special discrete and continuous distributions, functions of random variables, and selected applications.

 

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 31 Hours

 

Sophomore

 

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • MATH 2010 - Elements of Linear Algebra

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. Vectors and vector spaces, matrices and systems of linear equations, geometry of vector spaces and linear transformations in a vector space.

  • MATH 3110 - Calculus III  4 credit hours  

    MATH 3110 - Calculus III

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. Adjusts calculus techniques developed in the plane (Calculus I and II) to make them applicable in three-dimensional space. Introductory study of the nature of three-dimensional space and definition of the algebraic calculations in three-dimensional space. Differential and integral calculus definitions and techniques revised to appropriately transfer into this new space. Topics include multivariate functions, partial differentiation, partial integration, multiple integration, and multidisciplinary applications.

  • MATH 3120 - Differential Equations I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. The solution and application of ordinary differential equations with emphasis on first order equations, second order linear equations, Laplace Transform method, systems of differential equations, and numerical methods.

  • MATH 3460 - Foundation of Higher Mathematics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. The language of mathematics, set theory and proof, relations and functions, number systems, mathematical structures. Focuses on the transition from lower-division study to upper-division study by actively engaging the student in problem solving, mathematical reasoning, and both informal and technical writing.

  • Minor or elective courses 9 credit hours
  • Natural Sciences 4 credit hours

 

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 32 Hours

 

Junior

 

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

 

  • MATH 4510 - Abstract Algebra I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 3460. An introduction to groups, with a brief introduction to rings, integral domains, and fields.

  • MATH/STAT electives* 6 credit hours
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences (2 rubrics) 6 credit hours
  • Minor or elective courses 6 credit hours
  • MATH UD elective 3 credit hours

Subtotal: 27 Hours

 

Senior

 

  • MATH 4990 - Seminar in Mathematics

    3 credit hours

    Open only to Mathematics majors; normally taken during last regular semester of coursework. Required of all Mathematics majors. Offers graduating Mathematics majors a broad perspective of mathematics, mathematical activity, and problem solving in various areas of application; offers preparation for professional examinations; acquaints students with job possibilities and aids in career decisions; acquaints students with the nature of graduate study in mathematics. Pass/Fail.

  • MATH/STAT elective 3 credit hours *
  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours
  • MATH UD electives 6 credit hours
  • Electives 12 credit hours
  • Minor or elective course 3 credit hours

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Total hours in program: 120

 

NOTE:

*Choose from MATH 3260, MATH 4230, MATH 4250, MATH 4270, MATH 4310, MATH 4320, MATH 4420, MATH 4530, MATH 4700, STAT 3150, STAT 4190.

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Mathematics, Professional Mathematics (General), B.S., Academic Map  

 


Mathematics, Professional Mathematics Concentration (Industrial Mathematics), B.S.

Department of Mathematical Sciences 
615-898-2669
Don Nelson, program coordinator
Donald.Nelson@mtsu.edu

A major in Mathematics requires the mathematics core of 21 hours plus 15 hours of specified upper-level courses in the department and at least 12 hours of supporting coursework (either in or out of the department). The supporting coursework must complement the student's program and be approved by the mathematics advisor.

Each Mathematics major is required to declare a concentration. Concentrations include Professional Mathematics, Mathematics Education, and Actuarial Science.

Each Mathematics major is required to complete the Seminar in Mathematics, MATH 4990. All courses in the Mathematics major or minor (including supporting coursework) must be completed with a grade of C (2.00) or better. All courses transferred from other institutions for credit in the Mathematics major or minor must carry a grade of C (2.00) or better and be approved by the department chair.

Students opting to study the discipline of mathematics will choose between tracks in general mathematics, advanced mathematics, business, statistics, and industrial mathematics. In addition to the mathematics core, they will take 9 additional upper-level courses in the department chosen with the approval of the mathematics advisor. A single minor outside of the department and CSCI 1170 are required.

The following specialized courses do not count toward a Mathematics major or minor: MATH 1010, MATH 1410, MATH 1420, MATH 1530, MATH 1630, MATH 1710, MATH 1720, MATH 1730, MATH 1810, and MATH 4010. However, MATH 1630, MATH 1730, MATH 1810, and may count toward a minor in Mathematics for Managerial, Social, and Life Sciences.

Industrial Mathematics Track

The industrial mathematics track offers students a program of study that incorporates the areas of mathematics that contribute to business and industry. Coursework is designed to produce graduates who have strong qualifications that make them competitive for positions in industry and provides a solid foundation for students interested in pursuing graduate study in the area. The minor must be chosen from Computer Science, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Aerospace, or Engineering Technology.

In addition to the mathematics core, students pursuing this track must take MATH 3120, MATH 3260, MATH 4250, and MATH 4310. Required supporting coursework includes CSCI 1170 and CSCI 2170. Nine additional hours of supporting coursework must be chosen with the approval of the mathematics advisor from MATH 4601, MATH 4230, MATH 4270, MATH 4320, MATH 4700 and STAT 4190.

Mathematics Core (21 hours)

Each student majoring in the department must complete the following core (21 hours):

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  MATH credit hours  

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1920 - Calculus II  MATH credit hours  

    MATH 1920 - Calculus II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. A topics course providing a wide view of different techniques and applications of calculus in the plane. Techniques of integration and applications of integration fully developed. Power series and Taylor series included. Emphasis on multidisciplinary applications includes Taylor series approximation; applications of integration to physics, biology, and business; and geometric and power series applications. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 2010 - Elements of Linear Algebra

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. Vectors and vector spaces, matrices and systems of linear equations, geometry of vector spaces and linear transformations in a vector space.

  • MATH 3110 - Calculus III  MATH credit hours  

    MATH 3110 - Calculus III

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. Adjusts calculus techniques developed in the plane (Calculus I and II) to make them applicable in three-dimensional space. Introductory study of the nature of three-dimensional space and definition of the algebraic calculations in three-dimensional space. Differential and integral calculus definitions and techniques revised to appropriately transfer into this new space. Topics include multivariate functions, partial differentiation, partial integration, multiple integration, and multidisciplinary applications.

  • MATH 3460 - Foundation of Higher Mathematics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. The language of mathematics, set theory and proof, relations and functions, number systems, mathematical structures. Focuses on the transition from lower-division study to upper-division study by actively engaging the student in problem solving, mathematical reasoning, and both informal and technical writing.

 

  • MATH 2050 - Probability and Statistics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Calculus I. Data analysis, probability, and statistical inference. The inference material covers means, proportions, and variances for one and two samples, one-way ANOVA, regression and correlation, and chi-square analysis.

  • STAT 3150 - Mathematical Statistics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Two semesters of calculus. Probability theory including basic probability laws, properties of distributions, mathematical expectation, special discrete and continuous distributions, functions of random variables, and selected applications.

Curriculum: Mathematics, Professional Mathematics (Industrial Mathematics)

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

Students should consult their advisors each semester to plan their schedules.

Freshman

 

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  MATH credit hours  (Math)

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1920 - Calculus II  MATH credit hours  

    MATH 1920 - Calculus II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. A topics course providing a wide view of different techniques and applications of calculus in the plane. Techniques of integration and applications of integration fully developed. Power series and Taylor series included. Emphasis on multidisciplinary applications includes Taylor series approximation; applications of integration to physics, biology, and business; and geometric and power series applications. Graphing calculator required.

  • CSCI 1170 - Computer Science I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Sufficient background in algebra and trigonometry. The first of a two-semester sequence using a high-level language; language constructs and simple data structures such as arrays and strings. Emphasis on problem solving using the language and principles of structured software development. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours.

  • CSCI 2170 - Computer Science II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CSCI 1170 or equivalent. A continuation of CSCI 1170. Topics include introductory object-oriented programming techniques, software engineering principles, records, recursion, pointers, stacks and queues, linked lists, trees, and sorting and searching. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours.

  • Natural Sciences 4 credit hours

 

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 32 Hours

 

Sophomore

 

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

 

  • MATH 3110 - Calculus III  MATH credit hours  

    MATH 3110 - Calculus III

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. Adjusts calculus techniques developed in the plane (Calculus I and II) to make them applicable in three-dimensional space. Introductory study of the nature of three-dimensional space and definition of the algebraic calculations in three-dimensional space. Differential and integral calculus definitions and techniques revised to appropriately transfer into this new space. Topics include multivariate functions, partial differentiation, partial integration, multiple integration, and multidisciplinary applications.

  • MATH 3460 - Foundation of Higher Mathematics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. The language of mathematics, set theory and proof, relations and functions, number systems, mathematical structures. Focuses on the transition from lower-division study to upper-division study by actively engaging the student in problem solving, mathematical reasoning, and both informal and technical writing.

  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours
  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours
  • Minor or elective courses 6 credit hours

 

  • PHYS 2110 - Calculus-Based Physics I  0 credit hours  (Nat Sci) AND

    PHYS 2110 - Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Corequisite: PHYS 2111. A calculus-based introduction to mechanics and wave motion. One and one-half hours lecture.

  • PHYS 2111 - Calculus-Based Physics Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Corequisite: PHYS 2110. Laboratory course to accompany PHYS 2110. Experiments in mechanics, waves, and thermodynamics. Data reduction, error analysis, and report writing. Two three-hour sessions.

 

  • PHYS 2120 - Calculus-Based Physics II

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2111; MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Required corequisite: PHYS 2121. A lecture course that supplements the discussion in PHYS 2121. Topics include a microscopic view of electrical force and field, polarization, electric circuits, magnetic force and field, electric potential, symmetries of fields, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic radiation, optics, and wave phenomena. One and one-half hours lecture.

  • PHYS 2121 - Calculus-Based Physics Laboratory II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2111; MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Required corequisite: PHYS 2120. A laboratory-based course to accompany PHYS 2120. Includes discussions, group problem solving, and hands-on activities. Two three-hour sessions.

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Junior

 

  • MATH 2010 - Elements of Linear Algebra

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. Vectors and vector spaces, matrices and systems of linear equations, geometry of vector spaces and linear transformations in a vector space.

  • MATH 3120 - Differential Equations I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. The solution and application of ordinary differential equations with emphasis on first order equations, second order linear equations, Laplace Transform method, systems of differential equations, and numerical methods.

  • MATH 3260 - Differential Equations II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 3120. A continuation of MATH 3120 with emphasis on series solutions, method of Frobenius, orthogonal functions, equations of Bessel, Legendre, Gauss, Chebyshev; introduction to partial differential equations.

  • MATH 4250 - Theory of Calculus

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: MATH 3110 and MATH 3460. Theoretical development of limits, continuity, differentiation, and integration in one dimension.

  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours
  • Minor or elective courses 6 credit hours
  • MATH UD elective 3 credit hours

 

  • MATH 2050 - Probability and Statistics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Calculus I. Data analysis, probability, and statistical inference. The inference material covers means, proportions, and variances for one and two samples, one-way ANOVA, regression and correlation, and chi-square analysis.

  • STAT 3150 - Mathematical Statistics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Two semesters of calculus. Probability theory including basic probability laws, properties of distributions, mathematical expectation, special discrete and continuous distributions, functions of random variables, and selected applications.

 

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Senior

 

  • MATH 4310 - Numerical Analysis I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CSCI 1170 and MATH 2010 or consent of instructor. Application of computer-oriented numerical algorithms to algebraic equations, differential and integral equations, and linear algebra. Rigorous mathematical treatment of error included.

  • MATH 4990 - Seminar in Mathematics

    3 credit hours

    Open only to Mathematics majors; normally taken during last regular semester of coursework. Required of all Mathematics majors. Offers graduating Mathematics majors a broad perspective of mathematics, mathematical activity, and problem solving in various areas of application; offers preparation for professional examinations; acquaints students with job possibilities and aids in career decisions; acquaints students with the nature of graduate study in mathematics. Pass/Fail.

  • MATH/STAT electives 9 credit hours
  • Minor or elective courses 6 credit hours
  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours
  • Electives 4 credit hours

Subtotal: 28 Hours

 

Total hours in program: 120

 

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Mathematics, Professional Mathematics (Industrial), B.S., Academic Map  


Mathematics, Professional Mathematics Concentration (Statistics), B.S.

Department of Mathematical Sciences 
615-898-2669
Don Nelson, program coordinator
Donald.Nelson@mtsu.edu

A major in Mathematics requires the mathematics core of 21 hours plus 15 hours of specified upper-level courses in the department and at least 12 hours of supporting coursework (either in or out of the department). The supporting coursework must complement the student's program and be approved by the mathematics advisor.

Each Mathematics major is required to declare a concentration. Concentrations include Professional Mathematics, Mathematics Education, and Actuarial Science.

Each Mathematics major is required to complete the Seminar in Mathematics, MATH 4990. All courses in the Mathematics major or minor (including supporting coursework) must be completed with a grade of C (2.00) or better. All courses transferred from other institutions for credit in the Mathematics major or minor must carry a grade of C (2.00) or better and be approved by the department chair.

Students opting to study the discipline of mathematics will choose between tracks in general mathematics, advanced mathematics, business, statistics, and industrial mathematics. In addition to the mathematics core, they will take 9 additional upper-level courses in the department chosen with the approval of the mathematics advisor. A single minor outside of the department and CSCI 1170 are required.

The following specialized courses do not count toward a Mathematics major or minor: MATH 1010, MATH 1410, MATH 1420, MATH 1530, MATH 1630, MATH 1710, MATH 1720, MATH 1730, MATH 1810,and MATH 4010. However, MATH 1630, MATH 1730, MATH 1810, and may count toward a minor in Mathematics for Managerial, Social, and Life Sciences.

Statistics Track

The statistics track offers students a program of study in one of the broadest areas of applied mathematics. Statistical methods are used in many fields, including agriculture, business, communications, government, health, industry, public policy, sports, and science. Courses provide students the opportunity to learn data analysis and to develop skills in statistical methods of wide application. Emphasizing a blend of theory and practice, the program is designed to provide students with the necessary background for employment as statisticians in the public or private sector and to provide a solid foundation for those students interested in graduate studies.

In addition to the mathematics core, students pursuing this track must take STAT 3150 and STAT 4190; MATH 4990; and two courses from STAT 4200, STAT 4320, STAT 4360, STAT 4370, STAT 4380. One minor outside the department is required. Students also complete supporting coursework of 20 hours that complement the student's program chosen with approval of the statistics advisor. These courses include computing, information systems, and other relevant courses.

Mathematics Core (21 hours)

Each student majoring the department must complete the following core (21 hours).

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1920 - Calculus II  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1920 - Calculus II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. A topics course providing a wide view of different techniques and applications of calculus in the plane. Techniques of integration and applications of integration fully developed. Power series and Taylor series included. Emphasis on multidisciplinary applications includes Taylor series approximation; applications of integration to physics, biology, and business; and geometric and power series applications. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 2010 - Elements of Linear Algebra

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. Vectors and vector spaces, matrices and systems of linear equations, geometry of vector spaces and linear transformations in a vector space.

  • MATH 3110 - Calculus III  4 credit hours  

    MATH 3110 - Calculus III

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. Adjusts calculus techniques developed in the plane (Calculus I and II) to make them applicable in three-dimensional space. Introductory study of the nature of three-dimensional space and definition of the algebraic calculations in three-dimensional space. Differential and integral calculus definitions and techniques revised to appropriately transfer into this new space. Topics include multivariate functions, partial differentiation, partial integration, multiple integration, and multidisciplinary applications.

  • MATH 3460 - Foundation of Higher Mathematics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. The language of mathematics, set theory and proof, relations and functions, number systems, mathematical structures. Focuses on the transition from lower-division study to upper-division study by actively engaging the student in problem solving, mathematical reasoning, and both informal and technical writing.

  • MATH 2050 - Probability and Statistics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Calculus I. Data analysis, probability, and statistical inference. The inference material covers means, proportions, and variances for one and two samples, one-way ANOVA, regression and correlation, and chi-square analysis.

  • STAT 3150 - Mathematical Statistics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Two semesters of calculus. Probability theory including basic probability laws, properties of distributions, mathematical expectation, special discrete and continuous distributions, functions of random variables, and selected applications.

Curriculum: Mathematics, Professional Mathematics (Statistics)

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

Students should consult their advisors each semester to plan their schedules.

Freshman

 

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  (Math)

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1920 - Calculus II  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1920 - Calculus II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. A topics course providing a wide view of different techniques and applications of calculus in the plane. Techniques of integration and applications of integration fully developed. Power series and Taylor series included. Emphasis on multidisciplinary applications includes Taylor series approximation; applications of integration to physics, biology, and business; and geometric and power series applications. Graphing calculator required.

  • Natural Sciences 4 credit hours
  • Supporting course* 3 credit hours
  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours

 

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Sophomore

 

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • MATH 2010 - Elements of Linear Algebra

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. Vectors and vector spaces, matrices and systems of linear equations, geometry of vector spaces and linear transformations in a vector space.

  • MATH 2050 - Probability and Statistics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Calculus I. Data analysis, probability, and statistical inference. The inference material covers means, proportions, and variances for one and two samples, one-way ANOVA, regression and correlation, and chi-square analysis.

  • MATH 3110 - Calculus III  4 credit hours  

    MATH 3110 - Calculus III

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. Adjusts calculus techniques developed in the plane (Calculus I and II) to make them applicable in three-dimensional space. Introductory study of the nature of three-dimensional space and definition of the algebraic calculations in three-dimensional space. Differential and integral calculus definitions and techniques revised to appropriately transfer into this new space. Topics include multivariate functions, partial differentiation, partial integration, multiple integration, and multidisciplinary applications.

  • Minor or elective courses 6 credit hours
  • Natural Sciences 4 credit hours
  • Supporting course* 3 credit hours

 

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 29 Hours

 

Junior

 

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

 

  • MATH 3460 - Foundation of Higher Mathematics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. The language of mathematics, set theory and proof, relations and functions, number systems, mathematical structures. Focuses on the transition from lower-division study to upper-division study by actively engaging the student in problem solving, mathematical reasoning, and both informal and technical writing.

  • STAT 3150 - Mathematical Statistics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Two semesters of calculus. Probability theory including basic probability laws, properties of distributions, mathematical expectation, special discrete and continuous distributions, functions of random variables, and selected applications.

  • STAT 4190 - Mathematical Statistics II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: STAT 3150 or equivalent. Theory of statistical inference. Topics include sampling distributions, decision theory, estimation, test of hypothesis, regression analysis, analysis of variance, and selected applications.

  • STAT elective** 3 credit hours
  • Supporting courses* 6 credit hours
  • Minor or elective courses 6 credit hours
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Senior

 

  • MATH 4990 - Seminar in Mathematics

    3 credit hours

    Open only to Mathematics majors; normally taken during last regular semester of coursework. Required of all Mathematics majors. Offers graduating Mathematics majors a broad perspective of mathematics, mathematical activity, and problem solving in various areas of application; offers preparation for professional examinations; acquaints students with job possibilities and aids in career decisions; acquaints students with the nature of graduate study in mathematics. Pass/Fail.

  • STAT elective** 3 credit hours
  • Supporting courses* 8 credit hours
  • Minor or elective courses 6 credit hours
  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours
  • Electives 8 credit hours

Subtotal: 31 Hours

 

Total hours in program: 120

 

NOTE:

*Courses, chosen with approval of statistics advisor, include computing, information systems, and other relevant courses.
**STAT 4200, STAT 4320, STAT 4360, STAT 4370, STAT 4380

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Mathematics, Professional Mathematics (Statistics), B.S., Academic Map  

Carla Adamson
Instructor
carla.adamson@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Angela T. Barlow
Director, Mathematics and Science Education Ph.D.
angela.barlow@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Rajesh Barnwal
Associate Professor
rajesh.barnwal@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Sarah K. Bleiler-Baxter
Assistant Professor
sarah.bleiler@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Rebecca Calahan
Professor
rebecca.calahan@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Michaele F. Chappell
Professor
michaele.chappell@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Curtis Church
Professor
curtis.church@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Wandi Ding
Associate Professor
wandi.ding@mtsu.edu

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David Dueber
Instructor
david.dueber@mtsu.edu

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Tim Gipson
Instructor
timothy.gipson@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Lisa Green
Associate Professor | Biostatistics Coordinator
lisa.green@mtsu.edu

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Victoria Hamlin
Instructor
victoria.hamlin@mtsu.edu

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Dr. James Hart
Associate Professor
james.hart@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Rongjin Huang
Associate Professor
rongjin.huang@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Abdul Khaliq
Professor
abdul.khaliq@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Dovie Kimmins
Professor
dovie.kimmins@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Vatsala Krishnamani
Professor
vatsala.krishnamani@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Rachel N. Leander
Assistant Professor
Rachel.Leander@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Alyson Lischka
Assistant Professor
Alyson.Lischka@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Mary Martin
Professor
mary.martin@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Nancy McCormick
Associate Professor
nancy.mccormick@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Yuri Melnikov
Professor
yuri.melnikov@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Angie Murdock
Assistant Professor
julie.murdock@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Donald Nelson
Department Chair
donald.nelson@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Terrance Quinn
Professor
terrance.quinn@mtsu.edu

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Alier Reng
Instructor
alier.reng@mtsu.edu

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Brents Ring
Instructor
brents.ring@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Ginger Rowell
Professor
ginger.rowell@mtsu.edu

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John W. Schmidt
Instructor
j.schmidt@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Zachariah Sinkala
Professor
zachariah.sinkala@mtsu.edu

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Dr. David Chris Stephens
Associate Professor
chris.stephens@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Jeremy Strayer
Assistant Professor
jeremy.strayer@mtsu.edu

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Elaine Tenpenny
Associate Professor
elaine.tenpenny@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Dennis Walsh
Associate Professor
dennis.walsh@mtsu.edu

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Forrest Wang
Lecturer
Donglin.Wang@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Andrew Worsey
Professor
andrew.worsey@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Qiang Wu
Assistant Professor
qiang.wu@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Dong Ye
Assistant Professor
dong.ye@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Xiaoya Zha
Professor
xiaoya.zha@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Ping Zhang
Associate Professor
ping.zhang@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Jan Zijlstra
Associate Professor
jan.zijlstra@mtsu.edu

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Mathematics

MATH 990 - Basic Geometry
3 credit hours

Plane and solid geometry including measurement formulas, properties of plane figures, proof techniques, symmetry, congruency, and construction. Open only to those lacking required high school geometry course for unconditional admission to University.

MATH 1000 - Essentials of Mathematics
3 credit hours

The practices of learning mathematics. Required for students whose ACT Mathematics score is 15-16 or whose mathematics assessment indicates placement. Emphasis on problem solving, critical thinking, math study skills, and solving and graphing linear equations and inequalities. Course will meet for three hours in the classroom and will have a required two-hour lab component, which will include structured online activities. Does not fulfill General Education Mathematics requirement.

MATH 1010 - Mathematics for General Studies
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra and a Math Enhanced ACT of at least 19 or DSPM 0850 or COMPASS placement. Course satisfies the General Education Mathematics requirement and is also part of the mathematics sequence for students preparing to become elementary school teachers. Topics include logic, sets, algebraic reasoning, probability, statistics, and consumer mathematics.

MATH 1020 - Mathematics Colloquium
1 credit hour credit

Introduces new mathematical sciences students to the mathematics major. Topics include degree requirements, faculty resources, technological resources, research opportunities, and career options. About half of the meetings will involve one hour in-class lectures and activities, and half will involve attending talks, some of which may occur outside the scheduled class meeting time.

MATH 1410 - Concepts and Structure of Elementary School Mathematics
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra and a Math Enhanced ACT of at least 19 or DSPM 0850 or COMPASS placement. Algebra-based study of school mathematics in keeping with the recommendations of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. Tools for problem solving, set theory, functions, number theory, and examinations of number systems from counting numbers to irrational numbers.

MATH 1420 - Informal Geometry
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MATH 1410. Geometry-based study of school mathematics in keeping with the recommendations of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. Studies of plane, solid, coordinate, and motion geometry as well as constructions, congruence, similarity, and concepts of measurement. A variety of instructional technology tools investigated.

MATH 1530 - Applied Statistics
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra and a Math Enhanced ACT 19 or greater or equivalent. Descriptive statistics, probability, and statistical inference. The inference unit covers means, proportions, and variances for one and two samples, and topics from one-way ANOVA, regression and correlation analysis, chi-square analysis, and nonparametrics.

MATH 1630 - College Mathematics for Managerial, Social, and Life Sc
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra and a Math Enhanced ACT greater than 25 or MATH 1710. Topics include solving systems of linear equations, Leontief models, linear programming, mathematics of finance, set theory, and probability theory.

MATH 1710 - College Algebra
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: DSPM 0850 or two years of high school algebra; a Math Enhanced ACT 19 or greater or COMPASS placement. Course satisfies the General Education Mathematics requirement. Topics include functions--linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic; analysis of graphs; linear systems; inequalities; counting principles; and probability. Graphing calculator required. Course may be taken by correspondence. Not open to those who have had MATH 1730.

MATH 1720 - Plane Trigonometry
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Strong background in algebra recommended. Trigonometric functions of the acute and general angle, circular functions, graphs of trigonometric and inverse functions, identities, solutions of right and general triangles, equations, complex numbers, and vectors. Not open to those who have had MATH 1730. Graphing calculator required.

MATH 1730 - Pre-Calculus
4 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 1710 or successful completion of high school precalculus course. An integrated and rigorous study of the algebra and trigonometry needed to successfully attempt calculus. Emphasis on functions, their analysis and their applications. Level of algebraic sophistication developed above that found in MATH 1710. Topics include exponentials and logarithms, analysis of graphs, and word problems. Graphing calculator required.

MATH 1810 - Applied Calculus I
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Eligibility to take MATH 1710. First of a four-course sequence. Introduces mathematical modeling applied to real-world problems. Sets, functions, inverse models, limits, continuity, first and second order model building, single variable differentiation, implicit differentiation, inverse problems (exponential and log models). First and second derivatives used to study the behavior of real-world applications.

MATH 1910 - Calculus I
4 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

MATH 1920 - Calculus II
4 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 1910. A topics course providing a wide view of different techniques and applications of calculus in the plane. Techniques of integration and applications of integration fully developed. Power series and Taylor series included. Emphasis on multidisciplinary applications includes Taylor series approximation; applications of integration to physics, biology, and business; and geometric and power series applications. Graphing calculator required.

MATH 2010 - Elements of Linear Algebra
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 1910. Vectors and vector spaces, matrices and systems of linear equations, geometry of vector spaces and linear transformations in a vector space.

MATH 2050 - Probability and Statistics
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Calculus I. Data analysis, probability, and statistical inference. The inference material covers means, proportions, and variances for one and two samples, one-way ANOVA, regression and correlation, and chi-square analysis.

MATH 2110 - Data Analysis
1 credit hour credit

Prerequisite or corequisite: MATH 1530 or MATH 2050 or equivalent. Using computer software for graphing and analysis of scientific and statistical data.

MATH 2930 - Cooperative Education
1 to 3 credit hours

Experiential learning that occurs in real employment situations. Must be taken in sequence or approved by the director of Cooperative Education. Graded on a pass/fail basis.

MATH 2940 - Cooperative Education
1 to 3 credit hours

Experiential learning that occurs in real employment situations. Must be taken in sequence or approved by the director of Cooperative Education. Graded on a pass/fail basis.

MATH 3070 - College Geometry
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 3460. Advanced treatment of standard topics in Euclidean geometry using informal and axiomatic approaches. Includes proofmaking techniques, traditional and transformational geometry, finite geometries, and a brief introduction to other geometries.

MATH 3080 - Discrete Structures
3 credit hours

(Same as CSCI 3080.) Prerequisites: CSCI 1160 or CSCI 1170 and MATH 1910 or consent of instructor. Topics include formal logic, proof techniques, matrices, graphs, formal grammars, finite state machines, Turing machines, and binary coding schemes.

MATH 3110 - Calculus III
4 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 1920. Adjusts calculus techniques developed in the plane (Calculus I and II) to make them applicable in three-dimensional space. Introductory study of the nature of three-dimensional space and definition of the algebraic calculations in three-dimensional space. Differential and integral calculus definitions and techniques revised to appropriately transfer into this new space. Topics include multivariate functions, partial differentiation, partial integration, multiple integration, and multidisciplinary applications.

MATH 3120 - Differential Equations I
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 1920. The solution and application of ordinary differential equations with emphasis on first order equations, second order linear equations, Laplace Transform method, systems of differential equations, and numerical methods.

MATH 3180 - Introduction to Numerical Analysis
3 credit hours

(Same as CSCI 3180.) Prerequisites: MATH 1920 and CSCI 1160 or CSCI 1170. Topics include series approximation, finite differences, interpolation, summation, numerical differentiation and integration, iteration, curve fitting, systems of equations and matrices, and error analysis.

MATH 3260 - Differential Equations II
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 3120. A continuation of MATH 3120 with emphasis on series solutions, method of Frobenius, orthogonal functions, equations of Bessel, Legendre, Gauss, Chebyshev; introduction to partial differential equations.

MATH 3300 - Discrete Mathematics for Middle Grades Teachers
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: MATH 1410, MATH 1420, and MATH 1710. Supports the development of prospective middle grades teachers' knowledge of discrete mathematics. Topics include set theoretic topics, logic, counting, probability, graph theoretic topics. Focuses on students' learning discrete mathematics topics as well as the teaching of related mathematical topics to middle grades students. Field experience in a nearby middle school incorporated.

MATH 3310 - Functions: Connecting Algebra and Geometry for Middle G
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: MATH 1410, MATH 1420, and MATH 1710. Supports the development of prospective middle grades teachers' knowledge of functions and connections between algebra and geometry. Focuses on students connecting mathematics topics as well as the teaching of mathematical topics to middle grades students to support learning about the connected nature of mathematics. Field experience in a nearby middle school incorporated.

MATH 3320 - Teaching Mathematics in Grades 5-8
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Admission to the teacher education program. Required of all Mathematics majors seeking a license to teach mathematics in grades 7-12. Strongly encouraged for elementary education majors with a 5-8 emphasis. Topics from number relationships, mental computation and estimation strategies, patterns and functions, algebra, statistics, probability, geometry, and measurement. Must be taken prior to student teaching.

MATH 3330 - Teaching Mathematics in Grades 9-12
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education, completion of the mathematics core, and MATH 3320. Required of all Mathematics majors seeking a license to teach mathematics in grades 7-12. In-depth study of mathematics learning and teaching strategies in secondary school mathematics. Selected topics from junior and senior high school curricula provide a foundation for student investigations into the conceptual nature of mathematics and applications in the secondary school curriculum. Must be taken prior to student teaching.

MATH 3460 - Foundation of Higher Mathematics
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 1920. The language of mathematics, set theory and proof, relations and functions, number systems, mathematical structures. Focuses on the transition from lower-division study to upper-division study by actively engaging the student in problem solving, mathematical reasoning, and both informal and technical writing.

MATH 3970 - Cooperative Education
1 to 3 credit hours

Experiential learning that occurs in real employment situations. Must be taken in sequence or approved by the director of Cooperative Education. Graded on a pass/fail basis.

MATH 3980 - Cooperative Education
1 to 3 credit hours

Experiential learning that occurs in real employment situations. Must be taken in sequence or approved by the director of Cooperative Education. Graded on a pass/fail basis.

MATH 4010 - Selected Topics in Elementary Mathematics
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: MATH 1410, MATH 1420, and MATH 1010. Required of students who are preparing to teach grades 5-8. Examines in greater depth topics to which the student has prior exposure; emphasizes the relevance and implications of these topics to the middle school classroom.

MATH 4200 - Introduction to Mathematics of Investment
3 credit hours

(Same as ACSI 4200.) Prerequisites: MATH 1910 and one semester of probability/statistics; or consent of instructor. Calculus and probability/statistics used to model and analyze investments in bonds, treasury bills, stocks, and other derivatives. Topics include obtaining the price of a bond as a function of interest rate, developing formulas for duration and convexity to study the sensitivity of price to interest rate, and mathematical modeling of investor preference and attitude toward risk.

MATH 4230 - Vector Analysis
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 3110. A review of vector algebra and vector differentiation with emphasis on aspects of these topics not covered in previous calculus courses. Stress on line and surface integrals; Divergence Theorem and Stokes' theorem with generalizations and related topics.

MATH 4250 - Theory of Calculus
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: MATH 3110 and MATH 3460. Theoretical development of limits, continuity, differentiation, and integration in one dimension.

MATH 4270 - Introduction to Topology
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: MATH 3110 and MATH 3460. Fundamental concepts of topology including continuity, compactness, connectedness, separation axioms, and metric spaces.

MATH 4280 - Undergraduate Research
1 to 4 credit hours

Prerequisite: Permission of department. Independent investigation of a selected research problem under the guidance of a faculty member resulting in an oral and written report of results. May be repeated for a maximum of four credits.

MATH 4310 - Numerical Analysis I
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: CSCI 1170 and MATH 2010 or consent of instructor. Application of computer-oriented numerical algorithms to algebraic equations, differential and integral equations, and linear algebra. Rigorous mathematical treatment of error included.

MATH 4320 - Numerical Analysis II
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 4310. A continuation of MATH 4310.

MATH 4420 - Number Theory
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 3460. Divisibility, congruences, quadratic residues, Diophantine equations, quadratic forms, and continued fractions.

MATH 4470 - Introduction to Modern Algebra
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 3460. A treatment of sets, relations, operations, and the construction of number systems in algebra.

MATH 4510 - Abstract Algebra I
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 3460. An introduction to groups, with a brief introduction to rings, integral domains, and fields.

MATH 4530 - Abstract Algebra II
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 4510. The theory of rings, fields, integral domains, and vector spaces.

MATH 4540 - Topics in Secondary School Mathematics
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education, completion of the mathematics core, MATH 3070 and MATH 4510. Required of all Mathematics majors seeking a license to teach mathematics in grades 7-12. Examines in greater depth topics to which the student has prior exposure; emphasizes the relevance and applications of these topics to the pre-college level classroom.

MATH 4600 - Problems in Contemporary Mathematics
1 to 6 credit hours

Pass/Fail grading in specified sections.

MATH 4601 - Problems in Contemporary Mathematics Complex Variables
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 3460. Fundamental principles and applications of complex variables.

MATH 4602 - Problems in Mathematics
1 to 6 credit hours

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Problem-oriented course providing opportunities for mathematical study in areas of need.

MATH 4620 - History and Philosophy of Mathematics
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 3460. Background in geometry and number theory helpful. The character of mathematical thought by way of mathematical problems that have occupied the outstanding mathematicians of Babylon, Egypt, Greece, China, the Renaissance, and modern times paralleled with a study of three schools of mathematical philosophy: intuitionism, logicism, and formalism.

MATH 4630 - Mathematics of Risk Management
3.00 credit hours

(Same as ACSI 4630.) Prerequisite: ACSI 4200 or MATH 4200. For students in Actuarial Science, offers preparation for the Society of Actuaries/Casualty Actuarial Society Course 6. Topics include mathematical modeling of volatility; pricing of bonds, stocks, and other derivatives with uncertainty; benchmark portfolios; asset/liability management for property/casualty insurers; liability associated with a financially distressed company. Heath-Jarrow-Morton and Cox-Ingersoll-Ross models.  

MATH 4640 - Mathematics of Options, Futures, and Other Derivatives
3.00 credit hours

Prerequisites: ACSI 4630 or MATH 4630 or ACSI 4200 or MATH 4200. For students in Actuarial Science, offers preparation for the Society of Actuaries/Casualty Actuarial Society Course 6. Topics include risk management using options, interest rate swaps, interest rate caps, Black-Scholes analysis, Taylor series expansion to obtain hedge parameters, portfolio insurance, numerical procedures, interest rate derivatives, and use of Black's model.

MATH 4700 - Combinatorics and Graph Theory
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: MATH 2010 and MATH 3460. Selected topics in combinatorics and graph theory emphasizing combinatorial problem solving and algorithmic proof.

MATH 4740 - Research Methods
3 credit hours

(Same as BIOL/CHEM/PHYS 4740.) Prerequisite: YOED 3520. Provides secondary science and mathematics teacher candidates with the tools that scientists use to solve scientific problems. Students will use these tools in a laboratory setting, communicate findings, and understand how scientists develop new knowledge.

MATH 4800 - Seminar in Mathematics with Technology
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: 18 semester hours in mathematics including calculus or consent of instructor. Examine and utilize the technological tools available for doing mathematics. Emphasis on non-numerical tools such as theorem provers and algebraic manipulation systems.

MATH 4990 - Seminar in Mathematics
3 credit hours

Open only to Mathematics majors; normally taken during last regular semester of coursework. Required of all Mathematics majors. Offers graduating Mathematics majors a broad perspective of mathematics, mathematical activity, and problem solving in various areas of application; offers preparation for professional examinations; acquaints students with job possibilities and aids in career decisions; acquaints students with the nature of graduate study in mathematics. Pass/Fail.

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