• MTSU students gain real-world experience at our state-of-art dairy facility
  • Learning by doing is the norm for Animal Science students
  • Milk sold on campus is produced and processed in campus facilities
  • Animal Science students study the science and management of animals

Animal Science

If animals interest you and you’d like to learn about them in a hands-on, science-based curriculum under knowledgeable and friendly faculty, consider Animal Science at MTSU. Students explore the science, performance, and business of domestic food, fiber, and companion animal species, including beef cattle, dairy cattle, sheep, horses, goats, swine, poultry, and companion animals. Included also are disciplines such as nutrition, reproduction, genetics, behavior, meat science, management, health, and biotechnology. Animal Science students have the opportunity to “learn by doing” working with herds of beef cattle, swine, and dairy cattle at farm laboratories. In addition, several extracurricular animal-related student organizations, including the Block and Bridle Club, the Dairy Science Club, the Pre-Vet Society, and the Horseman’s Association, provide unparalleled opportunities for involvement.

This program is approved for the Academic Common Market.

Standing out in the herd

Standing out in the herd

MTSU's state-of-the-art dairy farm is responsible for every drop of milk served on campus. Home to the University's herd of about 70 dairy cows (and capable of housing up to 125), the teaching and production facility features a double-eight parallel milking parlor with rapid-exit gates that can milk 16 cows at a time. A computer-controlled milking system precools the milk to 58 degrees before it enters a 2,000-gallon bulk tank where it is cooled further to 38 degrees.

Block and Bridle develops leaders

Block and Bridle develops leaders

Founded with the goal of promoting animal agriculture and enhancing the professionalism of students who will one day be leaders in the industry, MTSU's local chapter of the Block and Bridle Club has around 40 active members. Each year the club hosts a steer and heifer show, a beef camp, and many other events.

A degree in Animal Science affords students a wide array of career opportunities after graduation or helps prepare them for continued study beyond the undergraduate level, including graduate degree programs (M.S. or Ph.D.) or professional programs in veterinary medicine (DVM). Some career opportunities with a degree in Animal Science from MTSU might include

  • Animal feed manufacturer
  • Animal health technician
  • Animal laboratory technician
  • Animal nutrition salesperson
  • Animal product processing supervisor
  • Animal shelter manager
  • Canine performance trainer
  • County extension agent
  • Government regulatory specialist
  • Livestock journalist
  • Livestock marketer
  • Livestock production manager
  • Pharmaceutical salesperson
  • Poultry production technician
  • Quality assurance manager
  • Veterinary technician
  • Vocational agriculture teacher
  • Wildlife technician
  • Zookeeper

Employers of MTSU alumni include

  • ADM
  • Aviagen
  • Cal-Maine Foods
  • Cargill
  • Farm Credit Services of Mid-America
  • Heritage Farms
  • Mars Petcare
  • Merck Animal Health
  • MWI Veterinary Supply
  • PIC International
  • Pilgrim’s Pride
  • Tennessee Department of Agriculture
  • Tennessee Department of Education
  • Tennessee Farm Bureau
  • Tennessee Farmer’s Cooperative
  • Tractor Supply Company
  • Tyson Foods
  • UT/TSU Extension

Undergraduates in the Animal Science program can pursue a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, following the industry path to pursue a career in animal science after graduation, or choose to follow the pre-veterinary medicine path of study in preparation to apply for admission to a college of veterinary medicine. Also available is a B.S. with a concentration in Horse Science.

For complete curriculum details, click on the REQUIREMENTS tab above.

Other majors in the School of Agribusiness and Agriscience leading to a B.S. are Agribusiness and Plant and Soil Science.

Students may also take courses in pursuit of an Agricultural Education Certificate. Undergraduate and graduate minors are available in Agriculture.

Graduate study includes the Master of Science (M.S.) degree in Horse Science with concentrations in Equine Education, Equine Physiology, and Industry Management.

Animal Science, B.S. Animal Science, Agricultural Education Certification Veterinary Medicine Study Preparation 


Animal Science, B.S.

School of Agribusiness and Agriscience
615-898-5217
Kevin Downs, program coordinator
Kevin.Downs@mtsu.edu
 

The program leading to a major in Animal Science offers preparation for leadership careers in livestock and related industries.

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Animal Science, B.S., Academic Map  

Degree Requirements

General Education (41 hours)

General Education requirements (shown in curricular listings below) include courses in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences.

The following General Education courses are required for this major:

  • BIOL 1110/1111 (Nat Sci)
  • CHEM 1010/1011 or CHEM 1110/1111 (Nat Sci)
  • MATH 1710 (Math) recommended

Major Requirements (44 hours)

  • ABAS 1000 - Orientation in Agriculture  1 credit hour credit hours  

    ABAS 1000 - Orientation in Agriculture

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Job opportunities in agriculture, departmental facilities, extracurricular activities at MTSU associated with specific phases of agriculture. Pass/Fail.

  • ANSC 1410 - Introduction to Animal Science

    3 credit hours

    Overview of the science, production, and management of domestic animal species, including beef cattle, dairy cattle, sheep, goats, swine, poultry, horses, and companion animals. Topics include reproduction; breeds, breeding, and genetics; nutrition and feeding; animal health; management; and products processing and marketing.

  • ANSC 1411 - Introduction to Animal Science Lab  1 credit hour credit hours  

    ANSC 1411 - Introduction to Animal Science Lab

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Focuses on applied learning concepts presented at the introductory animal science level. Topics include livestock, poultry, and companion animal breed identification; animal nutrition, feeds, and forages; reproductive science and management techniques; animal breeding and genetics; and basic experiential aspects of beef cattle, dairy cattle, swine, sheep, goats, horses, poultry, and companion animal production and management.

  • PLSO 1610 - Elements of Plant Science

    3 credit hours

    Fundamental plant processes; plant tissues, structures, environment, growth, development, reproduction, and propagation. Lecture/Lab.

 

  • PLSO 3340 - Soil  3 credit hours  OR

    PLSO 3340 - Soil

    3 credit hours

    Physical, chemical, and biological properties. Lecture/lab.

  • PLSO 4310 - Forage Crops  3 credit hours  

    PLSO 4310 - Forage Crops

    3 credit hours

    Adaptation, distribution, establishment, management, culture, and utilization of forage legumes and grasses. Lecture/lab.

 

  • ANSC 3420 - Animal Breeding and Genetics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ANSC 1410; BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111, BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121; junior-level classification or higher. Basic principles of genetics, crossbreeding, inbreeding, and molecular genetics. Animal breeding topics include use of quantitative traits, prediction of breeding value, methods of selection, and genetic evaluations including genomic-enhanced selection. Offered fall only.

  • ANSC 3440 - Livestock Management

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ANSC 1410. Management practices for farm animal species. Practices include animal handling, restraint techniques, feeding, milking, castrations, identification methods, and herd health problems. Lecture/lab.

  • ANSC 3550 - Animal Feeds and Feeding

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ANSC 1410/ANSC 1411; junior-level classification or higher. Focuses on practical application of nutrition to the feeding of domestic animal species. Topics include identification and characteristics of common feedstuffs; computer ration formulation procedures; life cycle nutritional management of beef cattle, dairy cattle, swine, small ruminants, poultry, and companion animals; feed stuff composition analysis procedures; feed processing, evaluation, and grading; feed control laws; and nutrition research methodology.

  • ANSC 4410 - Animal Nutrition  3 credit hours  

    ANSC 4410 - Animal Nutrition

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ANSC 1410; CHEM 1020/CHEM 1021 or CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121; junior-level classification or higher. Advanced study of the processes of digestion and nutrient utilization in domestic animal species. Topics include monogastric and ruminant digestive anatomy and physiology; carbohydrate, lipid, protein, vitamin, and mineral utilization. Lecture/lab.

  • ANSC 4510 - Domestic Animal Reproductive Physiology

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ANSC 1410; BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111, BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121; junior-level classification or higher. Advanced study of the anatomy, physiology, and endocrinology of reproduction in domestic animal species. Topics include male and female reproductive anatomy, hormonal control of reproductive processes, reproductive development, the estrus cycle, male physiology, and lactation. Current techniques to control animal reproduction described.  Lecture/lab. Offered Spring only.

  • Upper-division Animal Science electives 12 credit hours
  • Agribusiness or Plant and Soil Science elective 3 credit hours

Supporting Courses (19-20 hours)

  • BIOL 1120 - General Biology II  4 credit hours  AND

    BIOL 1120 - General Biology II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111. Corequisite: BIOL 1121. Primarily for Biology majors and minors and other science-oriented students. Survey of plants and animals emphasizing evolution, structure, function, reproduction, growth, and ecology. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • BIOL 2230 - Microbiology  4 credit hours  AND

    BIOL 2230 - Microbiology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111 and BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121 or BIOL 2010/BIOL 2011 and BIOL 2020/BIOL 2021. Concepts and techniques pertaining to the morphology, physiology, reproduction, isolation, cultivation and identification of microorganisms with particular emphasis on bacteria. Topics include the impact of microorganisms in our daily lives, both adverse and beneficial. Background in General Chemistry is strongly recommended. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • CHEM 1020 - Introductory General Chemistry II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1010/CHEM 1011. Corequisite: CHEM 1021 Topics include hydrocarbons, organic functional groups, isomerism, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids and proteins, enzymes, and metabolism. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory. Will not count toward a major or minor in Chemistry.

OR

  • CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II  4 credit hours  AND

    CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Corequisite: CHEM 1121. Chemical equilibrium, solid and liquid states of matter, chemistry of acids and bases, principles of chemical kinetics, precipitation reactions, elementary thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • CHEM 2030 - Elements of Organic Chemistry

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1020/CHEM 1021 or CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121. Corequisite: CHEM 2031. Aspects of organic chemistry fundamental to an understanding of reactions in living organisms. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

OR

  • CHEM 3010 - Organic Chemistry I  4 credit hours  AND

    CHEM 3010 - Organic Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121 or equivalent. Corequisite: CHEM 3011. Types of carbon compounds, their nomenclature, reactions, and physical properties. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

Electives (15-16 hours)

  • Minimum of 9 (or 5) must be upper-division

Total hours in program: 120

 

Curriculum: Animal Science

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

Freshman

 

  • ABAS 1000 - Orientation in Agriculture  1 credit hour credit hours  

    ABAS 1000 - Orientation in Agriculture

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Job opportunities in agriculture, departmental facilities, extracurricular activities at MTSU associated with specific phases of agriculture. Pass/Fail.

  • ANSC 1410 - Introduction to Animal Science

    3 credit hours

    Overview of the science, production, and management of domestic animal species, including beef cattle, dairy cattle, sheep, goats, swine, poultry, horses, and companion animals. Topics include reproduction; breeds, breeding, and genetics; nutrition and feeding; animal health; management; and products processing and marketing.

  • ANSC 1411 - Introduction to Animal Science Lab  1 credit hour credit hours  

    ANSC 1411 - Introduction to Animal Science Lab

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Focuses on applied learning concepts presented at the introductory animal science level. Topics include livestock, poultry, and companion animal breed identification; animal nutrition, feeds, and forages; reproductive science and management techniques; animal breeding and genetics; and basic experiential aspects of beef cattle, dairy cattle, swine, sheep, goats, horses, poultry, and companion animal production and management.

  • PLSO 1610 - Elements of Plant Science

    3 credit hours

    Fundamental plant processes; plant tissues, structures, environment, growth, development, reproduction, and propagation. Lecture/Lab.

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • Mathematics 3 to 4 credit hours ( MATH 1710 recommended)
  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours

 

  • BIOL 1110 - General Biology I  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci) AND

    BIOL 1110 - General Biology I

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: BIOL 1111. Primarily for Biology majors and minors and other science-oriented students. Biological principles and processes, including introduction to the nature of science, cells (structure, function, metabolism, division), genetics, evolution, viruses, bacteria, protists, and fungi. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory. While BIOL 1110 can be used to fulfill half the 8-hour General Education requirement for Natural Sciences, it is the first semester of a two-semester sequence primarily designed for science majors.

 

  • BIOL 1120 - General Biology II  4 credit hours  AND

    BIOL 1120 - General Biology II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111. Corequisite: BIOL 1121. Primarily for Biology majors and minors and other science-oriented students. Survey of plants and animals emphasizing evolution, structure, function, reproduction, growth, and ecology. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

Subtotal: 31-32 Hours

Sophomore

 

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours
  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours

 

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

 

  • CHEM 1010 - Introductory General Chemistry I  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci) AND

    CHEM 1010 - Introductory General Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: CHEM 1011. For students with no prior courses in chemistry; to be taken before CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Fundamental concepts of chemistry: measurements, matter, chemical bonds, chemical reactions, nuclear chemistry, states of matter, solutions, and electrolytes. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory. Will not count toward a major or minor in Chemistry.

OR

  • CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci) AND

    CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: High school chemistry. Corequisite: CHEM 1111. Fundamental concepts of atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometric relationships, periodic properties of the elements, thermochemistry, and properties of gases. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • CHEM 1020 - Introductory General Chemistry II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1010/CHEM 1011. Corequisite: CHEM 1021 Topics include hydrocarbons, organic functional groups, isomerism, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids and proteins, enzymes, and metabolism. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory. Will not count toward a major or minor in Chemistry.

OR

  • CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Corequisite: CHEM 1121. Chemical equilibrium, solid and liquid states of matter, chemistry of acids and bases, principles of chemical kinetics, precipitation reactions, elementary thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

Choose 6 hours from:

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

 

Choose one:

  • MATH 1530 - Applied Statistics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra and a Math Enhanced ACT 19 or greater or equivalent. Descriptive statistics, probability, and statistical inference. The inference unit covers means, proportions, and variances for one and two samples, and topics from one-way ANOVA, regression and correlation analysis, chi-square analysis, and nonparametrics.

  • MATH 1710 - College Algebra  3 credit hours  

    MATH 1710 - College Algebra

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: DSPM 0850 or two years of high school algebra; a Math Enhanced ACT 19 or greater or COMPASS placement. Course satisfies the General Education Mathematics requirement. Topics include functions--linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic; analysis of graphs; linear systems; inequalities; counting principles; and probability. Graphing calculator required. Course may be taken by correspondence. Not open to those who have had MATH 1730.

  • MATH 1720 - Plane Trigonometry

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Strong background in algebra recommended. Trigonometric functions of the acute and general angle, circular functions, graphs of trigonometric and inverse functions, identities, solutions of right and general triangles, equations, complex numbers, and vectors. Not open to those who have had MATH 1730. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1730 - Pre-Calculus  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1730 - Pre-Calculus

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 or successful completion of high school precalculus course. An integrated and rigorous study of the algebra and trigonometry needed to successfully attempt calculus. Emphasis on functions, their analysis and their applications. Level of algebraic sophistication developed above that found in MATH 1710. Topics include exponentials and logarithms, analysis of graphs, and word problems. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • ABAS 2210 - Introduction to Agricultural Engineering

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 or MATH 1010 or approval of instructor. Basic principles, mechanics, combustion engines, electricity, building construction, and machinery with applications of problem solving techniques. Lecture/Lab.

Subtotal: 29-30 Hours

Junior

 

 

  • BIOL 2230 - Microbiology  4 credit hours  AND

    BIOL 2230 - Microbiology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111 and BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121 or BIOL 2010/BIOL 2011 and BIOL 2020/BIOL 2021. Concepts and techniques pertaining to the morphology, physiology, reproduction, isolation, cultivation and identification of microorganisms with particular emphasis on bacteria. Topics include the impact of microorganisms in our daily lives, both adverse and beneficial. Background in General Chemistry is strongly recommended. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • PLSO 3340 - Soil  3 credit hours  OR

    PLSO 3340 - Soil

    3 credit hours

    Physical, chemical, and biological properties. Lecture/lab.

  • PLSO 4310 - Forage Crops  3 credit hours  

    PLSO 4310 - Forage Crops

    3 credit hours

    Adaptation, distribution, establishment, management, culture, and utilization of forage legumes and grasses. Lecture/lab.

 

  • ANSC 3440 - Livestock Management

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ANSC 1410. Management practices for farm animal species. Practices include animal handling, restraint techniques, feeding, milking, castrations, identification methods, and herd health problems. Lecture/lab.

  • ANSC 3420 - Animal Breeding and Genetics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ANSC 1410; BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111, BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121; junior-level classification or higher. Basic principles of genetics, crossbreeding, inbreeding, and molecular genetics. Animal breeding topics include use of quantitative traits, prediction of breeding value, methods of selection, and genetic evaluations including genomic-enhanced selection. Offered fall only.

  • ANSC 3550 - Animal Feeds and Feeding

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ANSC 1410/ANSC 1411; junior-level classification or higher. Focuses on practical application of nutrition to the feeding of domestic animal species. Topics include identification and characteristics of common feedstuffs; computer ration formulation procedures; life cycle nutritional management of beef cattle, dairy cattle, swine, small ruminants, poultry, and companion animals; feed stuff composition analysis procedures; feed processing, evaluation, and grading; feed control laws; and nutrition research methodology.

  • Upper-division Animal Science electives 6 credit hours.*
  • Electives 6 credit hours

Subtotal: 31 Hours

Senior

 

  • ANSC 4410 - Animal Nutrition  3 credit hours  

    ANSC 4410 - Animal Nutrition

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ANSC 1410; CHEM 1020/CHEM 1021 or CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121; junior-level classification or higher. Advanced study of the processes of digestion and nutrient utilization in domestic animal species. Topics include monogastric and ruminant digestive anatomy and physiology; carbohydrate, lipid, protein, vitamin, and mineral utilization. Lecture/lab.

  • ANSC 4510 - Domestic Animal Reproductive Physiology

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ANSC 1410; BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111, BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121; junior-level classification or higher. Advanced study of the anatomy, physiology, and endocrinology of reproduction in domestic animal species. Topics include male and female reproductive anatomy, hormonal control of reproductive processes, reproductive development, the estrus cycle, male physiology, and lactation. Current techniques to control animal reproduction described.  Lecture/lab. Offered Spring only.

  • Upper-division Animal Science electives 6 credit hours*
  • Upper-division electives 9 credit hours
  • PLSO/AGBS elective 3 credit hours
  • Elective 1 credit hour

 

  • CHEM 2030 - Elements of Organic Chemistry

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1020/CHEM 1021 or CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121. Corequisite: CHEM 2031. Aspects of organic chemistry fundamental to an understanding of reactions in living organisms. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

OR

  • CHEM 3010 - Organic Chemistry I  4 credit hours  AND

    CHEM 3010 - Organic Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121 or equivalent. Corequisite: CHEM 3011. Types of carbon compounds, their nomenclature, reactions, and physical properties. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

Subtotal: 29 Hours

NOTE:

*Electives must come from the following courses: HORS 3430, ANSC 3450, ANSC 3470, ANSC 3480, ANSC 3490, ANSC 3500, ANSC 3540, HORS 4090ANSC 4260ANSC 4470ANSC 4490, ANSC 4520, ANSC 4860.


Animal Science, Agricultural Education Certification, B.S.

School of Agribusiness and Agriscience
615-898-2523
 

Animal Science majors seeking certification to teach agricultural education in secondary schools (grades 7-12) must complete (1) the Animal Science major, (2) a Secondary Education minor, and (3) professional agricultural education courses.

The program leading to a major in Animal Science offers preparation for leadership careers in livestock and related industries.

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Animal Science, Agricultural Education Certification, B.S., Academic Map  

Degree Requirements

General Education (41 hours)

General Education requirements (shown in curricular listings below) include courses in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences.

The following General Education courses are required for this major:

  • BIOL 1030/1031 (Nat Sci)
  • PSCI 1030/1031 (Nat Sci)
  • MATH 1710 (Math) recommended

Major Requirements (43 hours)

Animal Science Core (13 hours)

  • ABAS 1000 - Orientation in Agriculture  1 credit hour credit hours  

    ABAS 1000 - Orientation in Agriculture

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Job opportunities in agriculture, departmental facilities, extracurricular activities at MTSU associated with specific phases of agriculture. Pass/Fail.

  • ANSC 1410 - Introduction to Animal Science

    3 credit hours

    Overview of the science, production, and management of domestic animal species, including beef cattle, dairy cattle, sheep, goats, swine, poultry, horses, and companion animals. Topics include reproduction; breeds, breeding, and genetics; nutrition and feeding; animal health; management; and products processing and marketing.

  • PLSO 1610 - Elements of Plant Science

    3 credit hours

    Fundamental plant processes; plant tissues, structures, environment, growth, development, reproduction, and propagation. Lecture/Lab.

  • ABAS 2210 - Introduction to Agricultural Engineering

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 or MATH 1010 or approval of instructor. Basic principles, mechanics, combustion engines, electricity, building construction, and machinery with applications of problem solving techniques. Lecture/Lab.

Remaining Major Courses (30 hours)

  • AGED 2230 - Introduction to Vocational Agricultural Education

    3 credit hours

    Duties of the vocational agriculture teacher with special emphasis on the Future Farmers of America and Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs. Lecture/Lab.

  • PLSO 3340 - Soil  3 credit hours  

    PLSO 3340 - Soil

    3 credit hours

    Physical, chemical, and biological properties. Lecture/lab.

  • ANSC 3420 - Animal Breeding and Genetics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ANSC 1410; BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111, BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121; junior-level classification or higher. Basic principles of genetics, crossbreeding, inbreeding, and molecular genetics. Animal breeding topics include use of quantitative traits, prediction of breeding value, methods of selection, and genetic evaluations including genomic-enhanced selection. Offered fall only.

  • ANSC 3440 - Livestock Management

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ANSC 1410. Management practices for farm animal species. Practices include animal handling, restraint techniques, feeding, milking, castrations, identification methods, and herd health problems. Lecture/lab.

  • PLSO 3600 - Horticulture in Our Lives

    3 credit hours

    Emphasis on the role of horticulture in everyday living, through principles of growing plants in the home, floral design, home landscaping, and gardening. Lecture/lab.

  • ABAS 4250 - Leadership in Agricultural Industries

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or consent of instructor. A capstone course to enhance students' leadership and human relation skills in the workplace. Topics include leadership styles, theories, characteristics of leaders (conceptual, technical, human relations), communication styles, group dynamics, conducting successful meetings, problem solving, goal setting, attitudes, motivation, self-concept, learning styles, time management, and employability skills.

  • ANSC 4410 - Animal Nutrition  3 credit hours  

    ANSC 4410 - Animal Nutrition

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ANSC 1410; CHEM 1020/CHEM 1021 or CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121; junior-level classification or higher. Advanced study of the processes of digestion and nutrient utilization in domestic animal species. Topics include monogastric and ruminant digestive anatomy and physiology; carbohydrate, lipid, protein, vitamin, and mineral utilization. Lecture/lab.

  • ANSC 4510 - Domestic Animal Reproductive Physiology

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ANSC 1410; BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111, BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121; junior-level classification or higher. Advanced study of the anatomy, physiology, and endocrinology of reproduction in domestic animal species. Topics include male and female reproductive anatomy, hormonal control of reproductive processes, reproductive development, the estrus cycle, male physiology, and lactation. Current techniques to control animal reproduction described.  Lecture/lab. Offered Spring only.

  • Animal Science electives 6 credit hours

Supporting Courses (6 hours)

  • AGED 4220 - Methods of Teaching Agriscience and Agriculture Mechanics

    3 credit hours

    Integrating science into agriculture emphasizing biology, chemistry, and physics. Emphasis on mechanical skills such as small gas engines, gas welding, and electricity. Lecture/lab.

Secondary Education Minor (30 hours)

SeeSecondary Education Minor for further information.

Total hours in program: 120

 

Curriculum: Animal Science, Agricultural Education Certification

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories. 

Freshman

 

  • ABAS 1000 - Orientation in Agriculture  1 credit hour credit hours  

    ABAS 1000 - Orientation in Agriculture

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Job opportunities in agriculture, departmental facilities, extracurricular activities at MTSU associated with specific phases of agriculture. Pass/Fail.

  • ANSC 1410 - Introduction to Animal Science

    3 credit hours

    Overview of the science, production, and management of domestic animal species, including beef cattle, dairy cattle, sheep, goats, swine, poultry, horses, and companion animals. Topics include reproduction; breeds, breeding, and genetics; nutrition and feeding; animal health; management; and products processing and marketing.

  • PLSO 1610 - Elements of Plant Science

    3 credit hours

    Fundamental plant processes; plant tissues, structures, environment, growth, development, reproduction, and propagation. Lecture/Lab.

  • AGED 2230 - Introduction to Vocational Agricultural Education

    3 credit hours

    Duties of the vocational agriculture teacher with special emphasis on the Future Farmers of America and Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs. Lecture/Lab.

  • Mathematics 3 to 4 credit hours
  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours
  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

 

  • BIOL 1030 - Exploring Life  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci) AND

    BIOL 1030 - Exploring Life

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: BIOL 1031. Designed for non-majors. Offers understanding, experiences, and skills related to common biological issues. Includes class discussions, small group activities, lectures, selected readings, and laboratory investigations. Students earning an A in BIOL 1030/1031 and wishing to declare a major or minor in Biology may substitute BIOL 1030/BIOL 1031 for BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111 toward meeting the requirement for the major or minor. Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory.

Subtotal: 29-30 Hours

 

Sophomore

 

  • ABAS 2210 - Introduction to Agricultural Engineering

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 or MATH 1010 or approval of instructor. Basic principles, mechanics, combustion engines, electricity, building construction, and machinery with applications of problem solving techniques. Lecture/Lab.

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • YOED 2500 - Planning and Assessment

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Completion of 45 semester hours and admission to Teacher Education. Offers preparation for planning instruction, assessing student learning, and understanding how classroom assessment and standardized testing should impact instruction. Introduces education policy, professionalism, and theory which informs students as they enter and practice the profession. Field experience required.

 

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

 

  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours
  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours

 

  • PSCI 1030 - Topics in Physical Science  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci) AND

    PSCI 1030 - Topics in Physical Science

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: PSCI 1031. Language, development, structure, and role of physical science (physics, chemistry, astronomy, and geology) as it relates to the knowledge and activities of the educated person. For nonscience majors. Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory. (A General Education course [Nat Sci]. Does not count toward any major or minor.)

 

Choose 6 hours from:

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 31 Hours

 

Junior

 

  • ANSC 3440 - Livestock Management

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ANSC 1410. Management practices for farm animal species. Practices include animal handling, restraint techniques, feeding, milking, castrations, identification methods, and herd health problems. Lecture/lab.

  • PLSO 3340 - Soil  3 credit hours  

    PLSO 3340 - Soil

    3 credit hours

    Physical, chemical, and biological properties. Lecture/lab.

  • ANSC 3420 - Animal Breeding and Genetics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ANSC 1410; BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111, BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121; junior-level classification or higher. Basic principles of genetics, crossbreeding, inbreeding, and molecular genetics. Animal breeding topics include use of quantitative traits, prediction of breeding value, methods of selection, and genetic evaluations including genomic-enhanced selection. Offered fall only.

  • PLSO 3600 - Horticulture in Our Lives

    3 credit hours

    Emphasis on the role of horticulture in everyday living, through principles of growing plants in the home, floral design, home landscaping, and gardening. Lecture/lab.

  • AGED 4220 - Methods of Teaching Agriscience and Agriculture Mechanics

    3 credit hours

    Integrating science into agriculture emphasizing biology, chemistry, and physics. Emphasis on mechanical skills such as small gas engines, gas welding, and electricity. Lecture/lab.

  • ANSC 4510 - Domestic Animal Reproductive Physiology

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ANSC 1410; BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111, BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121; junior-level classification or higher. Advanced study of the anatomy, physiology, and endocrinology of reproduction in domestic animal species. Topics include male and female reproductive anatomy, hormonal control of reproductive processes, reproductive development, the estrus cycle, male physiology, and lactation. Current techniques to control animal reproduction described.  Lecture/lab. Offered Spring only.

  • Animal Science electives 6 credit hours
  • YOED 3000 - Classroom Management

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: YOED 2500 with grade of B- or better and admission to Teacher Education. Introduces a variety of classroom management strategies and techniques that will foster a positive learning environment in the classrooms. Provides an overview of behavior management models, theories, and research as a foundation for classroom practice. Facilitates, through the use of field experiences, the analysis of school-wide policies/procedures and insight on real life classroom management expectations of the first-year teacher.

  • YOED 3300 - Problem-Based Instructional Strategies

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: YOED 2500 with grade of B- or better and admission to Teacher Education. Offers preparation for students to develop and present instructional strategies that frame curriculum content in problem-solving contexts. Field experience in a public school setting required.

Subtotal: 33 Hours

 

Senior

 

  • ABAS 4250 - Leadership in Agricultural Industries

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or consent of instructor. A capstone course to enhance students' leadership and human relation skills in the workplace. Topics include leadership styles, theories, characteristics of leaders (conceptual, technical, human relations), communication styles, group dynamics, conducting successful meetings, problem solving, goal setting, attitudes, motivation, self-concept, learning styles, time management, and employability skills.

  • ANSC 4410 - Animal Nutrition  3 credit hours  

    ANSC 4410 - Animal Nutrition

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ANSC 1410; CHEM 1020/CHEM 1021 or CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121; junior-level classification or higher. Advanced study of the processes of digestion and nutrient utilization in domestic animal species. Topics include monogastric and ruminant digestive anatomy and physiology; carbohydrate, lipid, protein, vitamin, and mineral utilization. Lecture/lab.

  • YOED 4030 - Residency I: Grades 7-12

    9 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education program; successful completion of YOED 2500, YOED 3000, YOED 3300 with a grade of B or better; overall grade point average maintained at a minimum of 2.75; grade point average in the major at a minimum of 2.5; and senior standing. A school-based clinical experience in a problem-based learning format.

    NOTE: All students must obtain a grade of B or better in this course to move forward to Residency II.

  • YOED 4400 - Residency II  12 credit hours  

    YOED 4400 - Residency II

    12 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education program; successful completion (with grade of B or better) of YOED 2500, YOED 3000, YOED 3300, YOED 4020,YOED 4030, or YOED 4040; passing score(s) on the specialty area exam(s) of Praxis II; overall grade point average maintained at a minimum of 2.75; grade point average in the major at a minimum of 2.50; and senior standing. A full-day, full-semester supervised teaching experience in a public school classroom. Pass/Fail grading.

Subtotal: 27 Hours

 

NOTE:

*Electives must come from the following courses: HORS 3430, ANSC 3470, ANSC 3480, ANSC 3490, ANSC 3500, ANSC 3540, HORS 4090, ANSC 4470ANSC 4490 , ANSC 4520, ANSC 4860.


Veterinary Medicine Study Preparation

School of Agribusiness and Agriscience 

Students who wish to pursue admission to a professional DVM program should follow the appropriate minimum admissions prerequisites for the institution(s) to which they intend to apply. The following curriculum will satisfy the admissions requirements for many, but not all, colleges of veterinary medicine. It is imperative that interested students fully apprise themselves of the specific admissions requirements.

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Veterinary Study Academic Map  

Requirements

 

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

 

  • CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: High school chemistry. Corequisite: CHEM 1111. Fundamental concepts of atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometric relationships, periodic properties of the elements, thermochemistry, and properties of gases. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II  4 credit hours  AND

    CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Corequisite: CHEM 1121. Chemical equilibrium, solid and liquid states of matter, chemistry of acids and bases, principles of chemical kinetics, precipitation reactions, elementary thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • BIOL 1110 - General Biology I  4 credit hours  AND

    BIOL 1110 - General Biology I

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: BIOL 1111. Primarily for Biology majors and minors and other science-oriented students. Biological principles and processes, including introduction to the nature of science, cells (structure, function, metabolism, division), genetics, evolution, viruses, bacteria, protists, and fungi. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory. While BIOL 1110 can be used to fulfill half the 8-hour General Education requirement for Natural Sciences, it is the first semester of a two-semester sequence primarily designed for science majors.

 

  • BIOL 1120 - General Biology II  4 credit hours  AND

    BIOL 1120 - General Biology II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111. Corequisite: BIOL 1121. Primarily for Biology majors and minors and other science-oriented students. Survey of plants and animals emphasizing evolution, structure, function, reproduction, growth, and ecology. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • Humanities and Social Science 18 credit hours *
  • PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730 or MATH 1910. Required corequisite: PHYS 2011. Web-based discussion class to be taken in conjunction with cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2011. Classical mechanics traditionally covered in a first-semester college physics course. Kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Class time used for discussion of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730 or MATH 1910. Required corequisite: PHYS 2010. Group-oriented problems course taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2010. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2010 discussion class. Covers kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

 

  • PHYS 2020 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics II

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2021. Web-based discussion class taken in conjunction with the cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2021. Fundamentals of optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. Scheduled class time is used for discussions of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2021 - Physics Problems Laboratory II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2020. Group-oriented problems course to be taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2020. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2020 discussion class. Optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. The skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

 

  • CHEM 3010 - Organic Chemistry I  4 credit hours  AND

    CHEM 3010 - Organic Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121 or equivalent. Corequisite: CHEM 3011. Types of carbon compounds, their nomenclature, reactions, and physical properties. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • BIOL 2230 - Microbiology  4 credit hours  AND

    BIOL 2230 - Microbiology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111 and BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121 or BIOL 2010/BIOL 2011 and BIOL 2020/BIOL 2021. Concepts and techniques pertaining to the morphology, physiology, reproduction, isolation, cultivation and identification of microorganisms with particular emphasis on bacteria. Topics include the impact of microorganisms in our daily lives, both adverse and beneficial. Background in General Chemistry is strongly recommended. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • CHEM 3020 - Organic Chemistry II  4 credit hours  AND

    CHEM 3020 - Organic Chemistry II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 3010. Corequisite: CHEM 3021. A continuation of CHEM 3010. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • BIOL 3250 - Genetics  4 credit hours  AND

    BIOL 3250 - Genetics

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111 and  BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121. Corequisite: BIOL 3251. An introductory course in genetics. Surveys and explores the sub-disciplines of genetics, including classical, molecular, and evolutionary genetics. Emphasis on the experiments, techniques, and theories forming the foundation of modern genetic research and its applications. Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory.

 

  • BIOL 4210 - Cell and Molecular Biology  4 credit hours  AND **

    BIOL 4210 - Cell and Molecular Biology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 3250/BIOL 3251, BIOL 2230/BIOL 2231, and CHEM 2030/CHEM 2031 or CHEM 3010/CHEM 3011. Corequisite: BIOL 4211. Cellular morphology and function. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • CHEM 3530 - Principles of Biochemistry

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 2030/CHEM 2031 or CHEM 3010/CHEM 3011. Corequisite: CHEM 3531. Structure, properties, and functions of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids and their reactions in living organisms. Three-hour lecture and one three-hour lab. Does not count toward Biochemistry major.

 

  • Math 0-6 credit hours ***

Subtotal: 72-78 credit hours

 

NOTE:

*May include English literature, speech, music, art, philosophy, religion, language, history, economics, anthropology, medical vocabulary, political science, psychology, sociology, and geography.
**Should have had organic chemistry plus BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111, BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121, and BIOL 3250/BIOL 3251 prior.
***MATH 1710 and/or MATH 1720 should be taken if student needs background for Physics.

The above requirements represent the minimum. Those students with inadequate knowledge of and experience with food and fiber species should highly consider taking additional courses in the animal sciences. Most students accepted into a professional DVM program first complete the B.S. degree in Animal Science at MTSU.

Animal Science

ANSC 1410 - Introduction to Animal Science
3 credit hours

Overview of the science, production, and management of domestic animal species, including beef cattle, dairy cattle, sheep, goats, swine, poultry, horses, and companion animals. Topics include reproduction; breeds, breeding, and genetics; nutrition and feeding; animal health; management; and products processing and marketing.

ANSC 1411 - Introduction to Animal Science Lab
1 credit hour credit

Focuses on applied learning concepts presented at the introductory animal science level. Topics include livestock, poultry, and companion animal breed identification; animal nutrition, feeds, and forages; reproductive science and management techniques; animal breeding and genetics; and basic experiential aspects of beef cattle, dairy cattle, swine, sheep, goats, horses, poultry, and companion animal production and management.

ANSC 3310 - Animal Care and Welfare
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ANSC 1410 or permission of the instructor. Applied aspects of animal care and welfare, including physical condition, feeding, proper housing, and environmental adaptation of animals to human interaction.

ANSC 3420 - Animal Breeding and Genetics
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ANSC 1410; BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111, BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121; junior-level classification or higher. Basic principles of genetics, crossbreeding, inbreeding, and molecular genetics. Animal breeding topics include use of quantitative traits, prediction of breeding value, methods of selection, and genetic evaluations including genomic-enhanced selection. Offered fall only.

ANSC 3440 - Livestock Management
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ANSC 1410. Management practices for farm animal species. Practices include animal handling, restraint techniques, feeding, milking, castrations, identification methods, and herd health problems. Lecture/lab.

ANSC 3450 - Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic Animals
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111, BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121; ANSC 1410. The parts, functions, and anatomical relationships of various organs and systems of domestic animals. Lecture/lab.

ANSC 3470 - Beef Cattle Production
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ANSC 1410; junior-level classification or higher. Management practices essential for economic beef production including breeding, feeding, and herd health. Purebred, commercial, stocker, feedlot, and processing segments evaluated. Lecture/lab. Offered fall only.

ANSC 3480 - Swine Production
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ANSC 1410; junior-level classification or higher. Understanding management of the pig's environment and genetics to maximize profits. Includes nutrition, reproduction, genetics, housing, herd health, and management practices. Lecture/lab. Offered Spring only.

ANSC 3490 - Poultry Production and Marketing
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ANSC 1410; junior-level classification or higher. A comprehensive study of commercial chicken production. Topics include the structure of the U.S. commercial chicken industries; poultry housing and equipment; broiler, broiler breeder, hatchery, and commercial layer management; and poultry/egg processing. Field trips used to supplement course materials. Lecture/lab or online.

ANSC 3500 - Small Ruminant Production
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ANSC 1410. The study of efficient sheep and goat production and management in the U.S. Topics include genetics and selection, reproduction, health and parasite control, nutrition, forages and grazing management, and product quality and marketing. Lecture/lab.

ANSC 3540 - Dairy Production
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ANSC 1410; juniors and seniors only. Feeding and management, ruminant digestion, physiology of milk secretion, production testing and official records, sanitary regulations, handling and marketing of raw milk. Lecture/lab.

ANSC 3550 - Animal Feeds and Feeding
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ANSC 1410/ANSC 1411; junior-level classification or higher. Focuses on practical application of nutrition to the feeding of domestic animal species. Topics include identification and characteristics of common feedstuffs; computer ration formulation procedures; life cycle nutritional management of beef cattle, dairy cattle, swine, small ruminants, poultry, and companion animals; feed stuff composition analysis procedures; feed processing, evaluation, and grading; feed control laws; and nutrition research methodology.

ANSC 3810 - Milk Processing and Marketing
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PSCI 1030/PSCI 1031 or CHEM 1010/CHEM 1011 and CHEM 1020/CHEM 1021, or CHEM 1110/CHEM 1120. Biological, chemical, and physical properties of cow's milk and its value as an animal food source; techniques of processing and marketing; governmental regulations; laboratory testing. Lecture/lab.

ANSC 4260 - Behavior of Domestic Animals
3 credit hours

Behavior aspects of raising and managing domestic animals to include equine, swine, goats, cattle, sheep, dogs, and cats. Communication, ingestive, sexual, social, aggressive, and abnormal behaviors emphasized. Lecture/lab.

ANSC 4410 - Animal Nutrition
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ANSC 1410; CHEM 1020/CHEM 1021 or CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121; junior-level classification or higher. Advanced study of the processes of digestion and nutrient utilization in domestic animal species. Topics include monogastric and ruminant digestive anatomy and physiology; carbohydrate, lipid, protein, vitamin, and mineral utilization. Lecture/lab.

ANSC 4430 - Internship in Animal Science
6 credit hours

Prerequisite: Approval of instructor. In-depth practical experience in a specific area of animal science pertinent to the individual's interest. Students work with producers and agencies that have agreed to cooperate in the program and to provide adequate salary and guidance. NOT OPEN TO STUDENTS WHO HAVE RECEIVED CREDIT FROM ANOTHER SCHOOL INTERNSHIP COURSE.

ANSC 4470 - Advanced Beef Production
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ANSC 1410 and ANSC 3470 or approval of instructor. In-depth analysis of various systems of beef production. Extensive field trips to cow-calf, feedlot, stocker, and purebred operations. Offered Spring only.

ANSC 4490 - Livestock Evaluation
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Approval of instructor. Comparative evaluation of beef cattle, swine, sheep, and horses. Develops defense of placing through an organized set of reasons involving terms describing the animal's characteristics. Importance of these characteristics to the animal function stressed. Lecture/lab.

ANSC 4510 - Domestic Animal Reproductive Physiology
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ANSC 1410; BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111, BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121; junior-level classification or higher. Advanced study of the anatomy, physiology, and endocrinology of reproduction in domestic animal species. Topics include male and female reproductive anatomy, hormonal control of reproductive processes, reproductive development, the estrus cycle, male physiology, and lactation. Current techniques to control animal reproduction described.  Lecture/lab. Offered Spring only.

ANSC 4520 - Companion Animal Management
3 credit hours

A comprehensive study of dog and cat management. Topics include canine and feline history; selective breeding; functional anatomy; reproductive physiology and management; nutrition and feeding management; diseases and health management; behavior, communication, and training. Service role of the dog and cat highlighted.

ANSC 4590 - Dairy Cattle Judging
3 credit hours

Ideal dairy cattle type and relationship to performance and longevity. Classification and evaluation according to type of the various breeds and comparative judging within the breed. Selection for genetic improvement.

ANSC 4860 - Meat Science and Technology
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ANSC 1410 and sophomore-level classification or higher. Selecting, inspecting, grading, fabricating, packaging, preserving, and cooking red meat products. Other topics include anatomy, structure, and composition of muscle, food safety, and microbiology. Offered Spring only.

Agribusiness and Agriscience

ABAS 1000 - Orientation in Agriculture
1 credit hour credit

Job opportunities in agriculture, departmental facilities, extracurricular activities at MTSU associated with specific phases of agriculture. Pass/Fail.

ABAS 1301 - Introduction to Agricultural Leadership
3 credit hours

Introduces agricultural leadership and illustrates the relationship between leadership styles, personality types, communication styles, and career selection. Offers preparation for leadership positions in agricultural careers and communities.  

ABAS 2010 - World Food and Society
3 credit hours

A global examination of the economic, political, social, and cultural issues related to hunger including war, politics, inequities, malnutrition, population growth, food production, biotechnology, ecological destruction, and food aid. Students will examine personal and societal values concerning world food issues and explore possible directions and solutions for the future. Includes a service learning experience.

ABAS 2210 - Introduction to Agricultural Engineering
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 1710 or MATH 1010 or approval of instructor. Basic principles, mechanics, combustion engines, electricity, building construction, and machinery with applications of problem solving techniques. Lecture/Lab.

ABAS 3010 - Agri-Media Skills
3 credit hours

Applications of oral and written skills in communicating about agricultural research, shows, and sales.

ABAS 4100 - Microcomputer Applications in Agriculture
3 credit hours

Includes use of agricultural software, agricultural communications networks, computer dairy feeding systems, and farm records.

ABAS 4250 - Leadership in Agricultural Industries
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or consent of instructor. A capstone course to enhance students' leadership and human relation skills in the workplace. Topics include leadership styles, theories, characteristics of leaders (conceptual, technical, human relations), communication styles, group dynamics, conducting successful meetings, problem solving, goal setting, attitudes, motivation, self-concept, learning styles, time management, and employability skills.

ABAS 4700 - Agriculture in Our Lives
3 credit hours

Everyone who eats and wears clothes is affected by agriculture, yet only a small percentage of the population actively farms. Course allows exploration of various organizations, both private and public, that support agriculture, provide career opportunities, and regulate the safety and fair trade upon which agribusiness depends. Issues that affect the lives of farmers and which may affect the future of many aspects of agriculture are explored. Local travel will be required. Combined lecture/lab.

ABAS 4910 - Problems in Agriculture
1 to 6 credit hours

Problem or problems selected from one of the major disciplines. May involve conferences with instructor, library work, field study and/or laboratory activity. Students can take from one to three credits with a maximum of three per semester.

ABAS 4990 - Seminar
1 credit hour credit

Students required to research and give an oral report on a current agricultural topic.

Plant and Soil Science

PLSO 1101 - Introduction to Ornamental Horticulture
3 credit hours

Ornamental horticulture from the scientific basis to commercial operations and management systems. Emphasis on the role of horticulture in everyday living through the introductory study of growing, maintenance, and utilization of plants to benefit people and the environment. Topics include basis of plant science and history, scope, and nature of ornamental horticulture including coverage of such diverse topics as production, craftsmanship, and business management skills.

PLSO 1610 - Elements of Plant Science
3 credit hours

Fundamental plant processes; plant tissues, structures, environment, growth, development, reproduction, and propagation. Lecture/Lab.

PLSO 3330 - Field Crop Production
3 credit hours

Economic importance, adaptation, origin, and history; botanical characteristics; cultural methods, uses, breeding, and pests of field crops. Lecture/Lab.

PLSO 3340 - Soil
3 credit hours

Physical, chemical, and biological properties. Lecture/lab.

PLSO 3350 - Soil Fertility and Fertilizer
3 credit hours

Use of fertilizer and liming materials in soil-plant relationships. Lecture/lab.

PLSO 3360 - Irrigation and Drainage
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PLSO 3340. Comparative evaluation and interpretation of irrigation and drainage systems; water supply development; interrelationships of the environment and plants; scheduling irrigation; examination of economic and legal factors. Lecture/lab.

PLSO 3370 - Soil Analysis
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PLSO 3340. Analysis of soils in laboratory. Lecture/lab.

PLSO 3600 - Horticulture in Our Lives
3 credit hours

Emphasis on the role of horticulture in everyday living, through principles of growing plants in the home, floral design, home landscaping, and gardening. Lecture/lab.

PLSO 3630 - Agroforestry
3 credit hours

Culture, conservation, management, and utilization of forest stands. Lecture/lab.

PLSO 3640 - Woody Landscape Plants
3 credit hours

Distribution, characteristics, relationships, and adaptation of native and exotic trees shrubs, and vines for landscape use. One-hour lecture and four-hour lab.

PLSO 3660 - Vegetable Gardening
3 credit hours

Principles of home and commercial vegetable production; adaptation, culture, fertility, diseases, and insects of vegetables. Lecture/lab.

PLSO 3670 - Fruit Production
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PLSO 1610 or 4 hours of biology. Introduces art and science of fruit production in the United States. Focuses on temperate fruit production, but also includes a general overview of citrus production. Conveys a general understanding of fruit production in the United States including propagation, orchard management, pollination, harvest, cultural practices, pests, and trends in the industry.

PLSO 3850 - Wine Science and Industry
3 credit hours

(Same as FERM 3850.) Prerequisites: PLSO 1610 and CHEM 1020/CHEM 1021 or CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121 or PSCI 1030/PSCI 1031. The science and marketing of wine, including grape production, fruit processing, and fermentation technologies. Explores wine marketing in Tennessee, the U.S., and the world. Student must be 21 years of age to enroll. Lecture/lab.

PLSO 4200 - Fruit and Vegetable Marketing
3 credit hours

(Same as AGBS 4200.) Prerequisite: BIOL 1030/BIOL 1031 or CHEM 1010/CHEM 1011 or CHEM 1020/CHEM 1021 or CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111 or CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121 or PSCI 1030/PSCI 1031 or approval of instructor. Basic biochemistry of respiration, handling techniques and practices, quality assessment and marketing of fruit and vegetable crops. Both domestic and international marketing of fruit and vegetable products discussed. Examines the economic impact of improper handling on both the local producer and the end user.

PLSO 4300 - Plant Protection
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PLSO 1610 or 4 hours of biology. Principles of protecting crop plants from damage by weeds, insects, diseases, and other biotic factors. Pest control by chemical, cultural, and biological methods with an emphasis on integrated pest management.

PLSO 4310 - Forage Crops
3 credit hours

Adaptation, distribution, establishment, management, culture, and utilization of forage legumes and grasses. Lecture/lab.

PLSO 4320 - Plant Physiology
4 credit hours

(Same as BIOL 4500.) Prerequisites:BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111, BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121, CHEM 1020/CHEM 1021, PLSO 3340. Plant mineral nutrition, photosynthesis, growth, development, and metabolism at the cellular and whole plant levels. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

PLSO 4330 - Turf Management
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PLSO 1610 or BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121 or PLSO 1101. Establishment and management of turf grasses for lawns, golf courses, and parks. Lecture/lab.

PLSO 4340 - Soil Formation and Remediation
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PLSO 3340. The relation of climate, plant and animal life, geological formations, and land forms to soil genesis and remediation. Lecture/lab.

PLSO 4350 - Soil Survey and Land Use
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PLSO 3340 or approval of instructor. Soil properties used to determine suitability for land use. Lecture/lab.

PLSO 4370 - Soil and Water Conservation
3 credit hours

Principles and practices of soil and water conservation in rural and urban environments. Lecture/lab.

PLSO 4380 - Interior Landscaping
3 credit hours

Principles and practices of designing, installing, and maintaining landscapes in malls, public buildings, and other indoor environments. Lecture/lab.

PLSO 4390 - Urban and Sports Turf Soils
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: PLSO 3340 and PLSO 4330. Describe, design, manage, and evaluate urban and sports turf soils. Lecture/lab.

PLSO 4500 - Agroecology
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: PLSO 1610 or 4 hours of biology. Theories of agroecology; focuses on sustainable agricultural practices and concepts. The impact of specific agricultural technologies and land use practices on the productivity of agricultural ecosystems, environmental quality, and human health. Examines the environmental science and agronomy of both conventional and alternative sustainable practices including benefits and limitations. Lecture/lab.

PLSO 4610 - Arboriculture
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PLSO 1610 or BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121. The culture of trees, shrubs, and vines in the landscape. Planting, transplanting, fertilizing, irrigation, pruning, problem diagnosis, and damage repair included. Lecture/lab.

PLSO 4620 - Greenhouse Management
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PLSO 1610 or BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121. Analysis of soils, fertilizers, irrigation techniques, container preparation, ventilation, growth regulation, and carbon dioxide enrichment for greenhouse operation. Two-hour lecture and two-hour lab.

PLSO 4630 - Floriculture
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PLSO 1610 or BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121. Propagation and other cultural practices for the production and maintenance of plants and flowers in the home. Two-hour lecture and two-hour lab.

PLSO 4640 - Landscaping
3 credit hours

Application of the principles of design, the use of proportionate-sized woody landscape plants, and other practices to produce low-maintenance-cost landscapes. One-hour lecture and four-hour lab.

PLSO 4660 - Nursery Management
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PLSO 1610 or BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121. Principles and practices of nursery management as a business. Nursery administration, financial management, and marketing. Cultural management of field- and container-grown nursery plants. Lecture/lab.

PLSO 4670 - Plant Propagation
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PLSO 1610 or BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121. Anatomical features and physiological principles involved in propagating plants from seed and by division, cutting, budding, and grafting. Use of growth regulators and environmental factors. Two-hour lecture and two-hour lab.

PLSO 4680 - Internship in Plant and Soil Science
6 credit hours

Prerequisite: Approval of instructor. Practical experience in a specific area of agronomy, horticulture, or soils. Classroom material related to practical application. NOT OPEN TO STUDENTS WHO HAVE RECEIVED CREDIT FROM ANOTHER SCHOOL INTERNSHIP.

PLSO 4690 - Crop Ecophysiology
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: PLSO 1610, BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121; senior-level classification. Focuses on crop/plan physiology and crop/plant-environment interaction. Topics include plant canopy architecture, plant root morphology, physiology of growth and yield, photosynthesis and crop yield, source-sink relationships and crop yield, carbon dioxide and crop yield, physiology of drought in crop plants, and physiology of mineral nutrition.

PLSO 4710 - Applied Mathematics and Statistics in Agriculture
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: MATH 1530, MATH 1710, MATH 1720, MATH 1730, or MATH 1910; senior-level classification. Focuses on applied mathematics and statistics in horticultural science and agronomy. Topics include basic mathematical operation and units conversion; fertilizer, nutrient, soil, plant, and pesticide-related calculation; and scientific experimentation and statistical analysis.

Contact and Student Information

Dr. Kevin Downs
kevin.downs@mtsu.edu
615-898-5217

Taylor Moss
taylor.moss@mtsu.edu
615-898-2031 | DSB 120

School of Agribusiness and Agriscience
Middle Tennessee State University
MTSU Box 5
1301 East Main Street
Murfreesboro, TN 37132

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