• Nursing
    MTSU's competitive Nursing program opens doors
  • Nursing
    There are many different ways to prepare for graduation
  • Nursing
    Students and professor pack supplies for a week at a Guatemalan clinic
  • Nursing
    Nursing students start their training
    in the lab

Nursing

Nurses are the health care professionals most people rely on today, whether it's the nurse practitioner who treats their everyday ills at a walk-in clinic or the emergency-room or critical-care nurse who soothes fears while helping save lives. Students who care—about people, about technology, about science, about their colleagues and the community—can join the MTSU School of Nursing's competitive and robust academic programs to develop their commitment to the art and science of nursing.

Easing the path to a B.S.N.

MTSU and Columbia State Community College have made it easier for nursing students with associate's degrees to upgrade to a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. A partnership announcement in late 2012 offers special advising options and transfer-student coordination to help increase the number of graduates in nursing jobs critical to Tennessee. The agreement even includes special help from Maury Regional Medical Center in Columbia, Tenn., to assist with clinical placement and career advancement.

Making connections with campus patients

The members of the MTSU Student Nurses Association aren't afraid to roll up their sleeves — or to ask others to do the same. Each spring, the students in the School of Nursing sponsor the MTSU Health Fair, a half-day event that features free health screenings, health-related giveaways, and advice for the campus community. The free screenings provide test results for patients' hearing, speech, vision, blood pressure, body-mass index, blood glucose, bone marrow, and HIV status. Student nurses, who help administer the tests, also help special resource providers offer information about good mental and sexual health, avoiding and treating eating disorders, and ensuring personal safety.

The degrees in nursing offered by MTSU lead to career opportunities in direct patient care as well as health care-related industries, such as research, compliance, education, and sales. Examples include

  • Bloodbank supervisor
  • Cardiac care nurse
  • Clinical operations/design specialist
  • Clinical researcher
  • Compliance education
  • Critical care transport nurse
  • Emergency room nurse
  • Family nurse practitioner
  • Home health care professional
  • Health, wellness, and fitness education
  • Nursing education
  • On-site nurse programs
  • Patient case manager
  • Pharmaceutical salesperson
  • School nurses

Employers of MTSU alumni include

  • Amerigroup Nashville
  • Baptist Hospital
  • Centennial Medical Center
  • Community Quick Care
  • Erlanger Health System
  • Foot & Ankle Centers of Middle Tennessee
  • Gold Skin Care Center
  • LifePoint Hospitals
  • Middle Tennessee Medical Center
  • MissionPoint Health Partners
  • Murfreesboro Medical Clinic and SurgiCenter
  • Nashville General Hospital
  • Primary Care and Hope Clinic
  • Roane Medical Center
  • Rolling Hills Hospital
  • Saint Thomas Hospital
  • Stonecrest Medical Center
  • Summit Medical Center
  • Teva Respiratory
  • Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Undergraduates in the School of Nursing may pursue a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.) degree via a traditional four-year baccalaureate program, first as a pre-nursing major and then, after three semesters and acceptance to the upper division, as a nursing major. Currently licensed Registered Nurses (R.N.s) with a diploma or associate's degree can join the R.N. to B.S.N. Program.

Graduate students in the MTSU School of Nursing may pursue a Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.) degree offered through the Regents Online Campus Collaborative (ROCC); four concentrations are available: Advanced Practice: Family Nurse Practitioner, Nursing Administration, Nursing Education, and Nursing Informatics. Graduate certificates in Nursing Administration, Nursing Education, Family Nurse Practitioner, and Nursing Informatics are available through ROCC.

Nursing, B.S.N.

School of Nursing 
615-904-8488
Jenny Sauls, program coordinator
Jenny.Sauls@mtsu.edu

The Nursing Program consists of four academic years. Students enter the program as pre-nursing majors and must complete the first three semesters of a pre-nursing curriculum consisting of General Education courses and nursing prerequisites. Students then apply for admission to the last five semesters which include 71 semester hours of upper-division nursing courses. When a student applies for admission to the last five semesters and is accepted and becomes enrolled, he/she is then classified as a Nursing major. The number of students accepted into the nursing courses is limited, making the application process competitive.

Upon successful completion of the program, graduates are awarded the B.S.N. and become eligible to sit for the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX) for Registered Nurse (RN) licensure.

Pre-nursing students enrolled in the University and pursuing the first three semesters of the curriculum should maintain a minimum 2.80 cumulative grade point average and are required to earn no less than a C (2.00) in any prerequisite course. Nursing clinicals may be offered in evening, night, or weekend shifts.

Admission and Progression in the Pre-nursing Curriculum
  1. Any student formally admitted to the University may pursue the pre-nursing curriculum.
  2. Information form, obtained from the School of Nursing (www.mtsu.edu/nursing), must be completed and on file in the School of Nursing.
  3. Pre-nursing students are expected to seek advising from the academic advisor for nursing each semester to ensure the proper sequence for program completion.
Admission and Progression in the Upper-division Nursing Curriculum
  1. Updated information and application forms must be on file in the School of Nursing by published application deadlines.
  2. Transcript validation of all prerequisite courses must be on file in the MTSU Records Office and in the School of Nursing by published application deadlines.
  3. Student must have completed BIOL 2010/BIOL 2011 with a grade of C (2.00) or better before making application to upper-division nursing.
  4. Applicants must have no grade less than a C (2.00) in any prerequisite and General Education course by the end of Summer Term (for those entering in Fall Semester), or by the end of Fall Semester (for those entering in Spring Semester).
  5. Scores from a standardized examination and an interview, along with the cumulative college grade point average will be used to calculate a composite score and to rank candidates for progression to the upper division. To be considered for admission to upper-division nursing, a minimum GPA of 2.80 is required.
  6. Add 1/2 point to composite score for any student who can provide documented evidence of clinical experience providing direct patient care for a period of at least 380 hours within the two years prior to making application to upper-division nursing.
  7. Students must attain a minimum grade of C (2.00) in all theory courses as well as a "pass" in each corresponding lab/clinical course.
  8. Comprehensive assessment tools and/or standardized exams are administered throughout the curriculum.
  9. Students will be asked to present evidence of physical and/or mental health prior to or at any time during their enrollment in the nursing courses. Students must be physically, emotionally, and cognitively able to meet the criteria required for clinical skills. Students must be able to perform clinical skills without physical or psychological threat to themselves or others. Students who have chronic health problems which are controlled and which do not put themselves or others in danger are eligible to be considered for admission.
  10. Faculty reserves the right to determine each student's eligibility to participate in clinical rotations based upon satisfactory preparation, meeting School of Nursing and clinical agency's policies, and performance at a safe level of practice. If any of these are not satisfactory, faculty may give a student an unsatisfactory grade and ask a student to leave the clinical agency for the day.
  11. Students with infectious diseases will not be permitted to participate in clinical experiences. Causes for clinical absences must be cleared with the instructor and reported to the clinical agency before the clinical experience is to begin. Unexcused absences will be counted as unsatisfactory clinical performance.
  12. Students will be dismissed from the Nursing major if they
    1. commit a breach of ethics or gross professional negligence, or
    2. use mind-altering drugs or alcohol when engaged in any nursing activity in or outside of class, or
    3. fail to progress due to unsuccessful attainment of requirements. Students who fail to progress will be readmitted on a space-available basis. Only one readmission for failure to progress will be allowed. Students admitted from other nursing programs in which a grade of D (less than 2.00) was made in nursing will not be readmitted after one failure.
    4. violate the student honor code.
  13. If a student fails a nursing course at MTSU, he/she must repeat that course at MTSU.
  14. Further specific details regarding admission and progression are available in the School of Nursing.
Revised Admission and Progression in the Upper-division Nursing Curriculum (Effective Fall 2016)

The Revised School of Nursing Admission and Progress Guidelines will apply to incoming Freshman Fall 2015 and to any student making application in the Fall of 2016 for admission to Nursing in the Spring of 2017.

Special Provisions for Licensed Two-Year and Hospital Diploma Graduates

Students holding the RN license must meet freshman and sophomore requirements. Each registered nurse who has graduated from an NLN-accredited program with an associate degree in nursing or a hospital diploma in nursing will satisfy 38 credit hours of required courses in addition to HLTH 1530/HLTH 1531. This credit, however, will be held in escrow until the student has matriculated and successfully completed NURS 3010, NURS 3030, NURS 3040, NURS 3111, NURS 3170, NURS 3370, and NURS 3570. Those holding degrees from non-NLN accredited or foreign nursing schools will have to complete proficiency exams in addition to the other junior-level nursing courses before credit is awarded for nursing courses.

Students holding R.N. licensure complete the following:
Junior Level
Subtotal: 18 Hours
Senior Level
Subtotal: 16 Hours

Curriculum: Nursing

The following program of study is recommended; however, students are expected to seek advising from the pre-nursing advisor or faculty advisor each semester to ensure proper sequence for program completion. The faculty reserves the right to make changes in curricula requirements and/or course sequencing as appropriate.

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

Freshman Fall

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • MATH 1530 - Applied Statistics  3 credit hours  (Math)

    MATH 1530 - Applied Statistics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra and a Math Enhanced ACT 19 or greater or equivalent. Descriptive statistics, probability, and statistical inference. The inference unit covers means, proportions, and variances for one and two samples, and topics from one-way ANOVA, regression and correlation analysis, chi-square analysis, and nonparametrics.

  • PSY 1410 - General Psychology  3 credit hours  (Soc/Beh Sci)

    PSY 1410 - General Psychology

    3 credit hours

    Prescribed prerequisite: READ 1000. Introductory survey course. Includes biological foundations, perception, principles of learning, intelligence, motivation, emotion, human development, personality, social psychology, behavior disorders, and psychotherapy.

 

  • BIOL 2010 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci)

    BIOL 2010 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I

    4 credit hours

    Completion of  BIOL 1030 and  BIOL 1031 or a grade of C or better in high school chemistry and biology within the last five years is strongly recommended. Corequisite:  BIOL 2011 . Meets requirements for many pre-health professional programs including nursing. Structure and function of the cell, integumentary, skeletal, muscle, and nervous systems. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.  

Subtotal: 16 Hours

Freshman Spring

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

 

  • BIOL 2020 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: C or better in BIOL 2010/BIOL 2011. Corequisite: BIOL 2021. Meets requirements for many pre-health professional programs including nursing. Structure and function of endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, urinary, digestive, and reproductive systems. Biology majors passing both BIOL 2010/BIOL 2111 and BIOL 2020/BIOL 2021 with a C or better may substitute both courses for BIOL 3020. However, the substitution is not recommended for pre-med students and does not count for upper-division hours. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • CHEM 1010 - Introductory General Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: CHEM 1011. For students with no prior courses in chemistry; to be taken before CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Fundamental concepts of chemistry: measurements, matter, chemical bonds, chemical reactions, nuclear chemistry, states of matter, solutions, and electrolytes. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory. Will not count toward a major or minor in Chemistry.

OR

  • CHEM 1030 - Chemistry for Consumers

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: CHEM 1031. Language, development, structure, and role of chemistry as it relates to the knowledge and activities of the educated person. Examples will be taken from medicine and human health, environmental pollution, energy and its costs, etc. Understanding of the relationship between chemistry and society will be enhanced using special subtopics: lectures, demonstrations, and inquiry-based laboratory work drawing from the expertise of the individual instructor. For nonscience majors. Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory. (Does not count toward any major or minor.)

OR

  • PSCI 1030 - Topics in Physical Science

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: PSCI 1031. Language, development, structure, and role of physical science (physics, chemistry, astronomy, and geology) as it relates to the knowledge and activities of the educated person. For nonscience majors. Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory. (A General Education course [Nat Sci]. Does not count toward any major or minor.)

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History  3 credit hours  

    HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 17 Hours

Sophomore Fall

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

 

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

 

  • BIOL 2230 - Microbiology  4 credit hours  AND

    BIOL 2230 - Microbiology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111 and BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121 or BIOL 1030/BIOL 1031 and BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121 or BIOL 2010/BIOL 2011 and BIOL 2020/BIOL 2021. Concepts and techniques pertaining to the morphology, physiology, reproduction, isolation, cultivation and identification of microorganisms with particular emphasis on bacteria. Topics include the impact of microorganisms in our daily lives, both adverse and beneficial. Background in General Chemistry is strongly recommended. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History  3 credit hours  

    HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 16 Hours

Sophomore Spring

  • NURS 3000 - Professionalism in Nursing  1 credit hour credit hours  

    NURS 3000 - Professionalism in Nursing

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Exposes the novice nursing student to the profession of nursing. Concept of professionalism explored and related to nursing. Includes a brief historical review of nursing and nursing theories. Professional values, practice standards,informatics,  and communications with health care professional introduced. Legal implications for nursing explored.

  • NURS 3010 - Pathophysiology  3 credit hours  

    NURS 3010 - Pathophysiology

    3 credit hours

    (Same as BIOL 3340.) Prerequisites: BIOL 2010/BIOL 2011, BIOL 2020/BIOL 2021, and BIOL 2230/BIOL 2231. Basic mechanisms of disease processes and their role in disrupting normal physiology. Three hours lecture.

  • NURS 3030 - Health Assessment  2 credit hours  

    NURS 3030 - Health Assessment

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 2010/BIOL 2011 and BIOL 2020/BIOL 2021; accepted into upper-division nursing. Corequisite: NURS 3040. Principles and techniques required for the assessment and analysis of data. Normal assessment findings and selected abnormal findings studied. Cultural variations and assessment variations across the lifespan explored.

  • NURS 3040 - Health Assessment Laboratory  1 credit hour credit hours  

    NURS 3040 - Health Assessment Laboratory

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 2010/BIOL 2011 and BIOL 2020/BIOL 2021; accepted into upper-division nursing. Corequisite: NURS 3030. Opportunity to practice the basic principles and techniques required for the assessment and analysis of data. Normal assessment findings in the adult as well as selected abnormal findings studied. Cultural variations and assessment variations across the lifespan explored. Two-hour laboratory.

  • NURS 3370 - Health and Gerontology

    3 credit hours

    Focuses on the normal aging process and related health care issues from an interdisciplinary perspective. Incorporates concepts of health promotion, prevention, and adaptation for those who are aging and their families. Three hours lecture.

Subtotal: 13 Hours

Junior Fall

  • NURS 3170 - Clinical Pharmacology in Nursing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: General Education Natural Science; BIOL 2230/BIOL 2231, BIOL 2010/BIOL 2011, BIOL 2020/BIOL 2021; NURS 3000, NURS 3010, NURS 3030, NURS 3040, NURS 3370. Knowledge and responsibility necessary for the assessment and monitoring of clients receiving pharmacotherapeutics. Three hours lecture.

  • NURS 3350 - Introduction to Nursing Practice

    5 credit hours

    Prerequisites: NURS 3000, NURS 3010, NURS 3030, NURS 3040, and NURS 3370. Corequisites: NURS 3170 and NURS 3360. Introduces nursing care concepts necessary to support basic care of clients across the lifespan; foundation for subsequent nursing courses. Five hours lecture.

  • NURS 3360 - Introduction to Nursing Practice-Clinical

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: NURS 3000, NURS 3010, NURS 3030, NURS 3040, and NURS 3370. Corequisites: NURS 3170 and NURS 3350. Nursing practice applied in laboratory and clinical settings. Six hours laboratory per week for duration of course.

  • NURS 3570 - Health Care Research

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: NURS 3000, NURS 3010, NURS 3030, NURS 3040, NURS 3370. Explores the role of the professional nurse by utilizing systematic inquiry and analysis for problem solving and supporting evidence based practice for positive patient outcomes. Three hours lecture.

Subtotal: 14 Hours

Junior Spring

  • NURS 3530 - Caring for Adult Clients I

    5 credit hours

    Prerequisites: NURS 3170, NURS 3350, NURS 3360, and NURS 3570. Corequisite: NURS 3540. Professional nursing care in a variety of settings for the adult client with simple and chronic health problems. Five hours lecture.

  • NURS 3540 - Caring for Adult Clients I-Clinical

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: NURS 3170, NURS 3350, NURS 3360, NURS 3570. Corequisite: NURS 3530 . Applying the nursing process in a clinical setting with the adult client experiencing acute and chronic health deviations. Twenty hours clinical/lab per week for seven weeks.

  • NURS 3550 - Caring for the Childbearing Family

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: NURS 3170, NURS 3350, NURS 3360, and NURS 3570. Corequisite: NURS 3560. Incorporates the nursing process and critical thinking skills into the professional nursing care of the childbearing female and the family. Focuses on health promotion, prevention, and adaptation for the childbearing client. Three hours lecture.

  • NURS 3560 - Caring for the Childbearing Family-Clinical

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisites: NURS 3170, NURS 3350, NURS 3360, and NURS 3570. Corequisite: NURS 3550. Nursing process for applying the clinical application and principles of nursing and family theory to childbearing families. Focuses on health promotion, prevention, and adaptation for childbearing families. Sixteen hours clinical/lab per week for seven weeks.

Subtotal: 14 Hours

Senior Fall

  • NURS 4330 - Caring for Adult Clients II

    5 credit hours

    Prerequisites: NURS 3530, NURS 3540, NURS 3550, NURS 3560. Corequisite: NURS 4340. Incorporates the nursing process and critical thinking skills into the professional nursing care of the adult client experiencing complex, multi-system illness, failure, and trauma. Opportunities for the nursing student to combine acquired knowledge from previous nursing courses and courses from other disciplines with new phenomena encountered in a variety of high acuity care settings. Five hours lecture.

  • NURS 4340 - Caring for Adult Clients II-Clinical

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: NURS 3530, NURS 3540, NURS 3550, NURS 3560. Corequisite: NURS 4330. Opportunity for nursing students to integrate didactic and empirical knowledge and skills for clients with critical needs into the acute care setting. Understanding of complex, multi-system illness, failure, and trauma in providing nursing care. Twenty hours clinical/lab for four weeks.

  • NURS 4350 - Caring for Children and Teen Clients

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: NURS 3530, NURS 3540, NURS 3550, and NURS 3560. Corequisite: NURS 4360. Incorporates the nursing process and critical thinking skills into the professional nursing care of children, adolescents, and their families. Explores the principles of growth and development and family-centered care. Three hours lecture.

  • NURS 4360 - Caring for Children and Teen Clients-Clinical

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisites: NURS 3530, NURS 3540, NURS 3550, and NURS 3560. Corequisite: NURS 4350. Provides assistance in transferring knowledge to the implementation of nursing care of children, adolescents, teens, and their families in a variety of clinical settings. Sixteen hours clinical/lab per week for four weeks.

Subtotal: 14 Hours

Senior Spring

  • NURS 4530 - Caring for the Community as Client

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: NURS 4330, NURS 4340, NURS 4350, NURS 4360. Corequisites: NURS 4550 and NURS 4560. Opportunity for students to learn theoretical concepts and epidemiological principles related to health promotion and preventive services. Primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of prevention covered. Focuses on the work of an interdisciplinary health care team and concepts of nursing and public health when working with the individual, family, group, and community as client. Three hours lecture.

  • NURS 4550 - Caring for Clients with Mental Health Alterations

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: NURS 4330, NURS 4340, NURS 4350 and NURS 4360, and NURS 4530. Corequisite: NURS 4560. Opportunity for students to learn theoretical concepts relating to mental health and psychiatric nursing. Interpersonal and group communication, psychopathology, and legal and ethical issues explored. Methods used in providing nursing care for clients with alterations in mental health presented. Interdisciplinary health care team and its function in the psychiatric setting explored. Three hours lecture.

  • NURS 4560 - Community and Mental Health Clinical

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisites: NURS 4330, NURS 4340, NURS 4350, and NURS 4360. Corequisites: NURS 4530, and NURS 4550. Familiarizes the undergraduate nursing student with ways to care for aggregates. Emphasis on clients in the community and in in-patient psychiatric facilities. Sixteen hours clinical/lab per week for four weeks.

  • NURS 4570 - Professional Practice and Leadership

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: NURS 4330, NURS 4340, NURS 4350, and NURS 4360. Opportunity for students to examine and evaluate theoretical concepts relating to leadership and management in nursing. The learning experiences emphasize the development of strategies that enhance leadership capabilities including decision-making, managing conflict, using power, and delegating. Three hours lecture.

  • NURS 4590 - Capstone Clinical  5 credit hours  

    NURS 4590 - Capstone Clinical

    5 credit hours

    Prerequisites: NURS 3000, NURS 3010, NURS 3030, NURS 3040, NURS 3370, NURS 3350, NURS 3360, NURS 3570, NURS 3170, NURS 3530, NURS 3540, NURS 3550, NURS 3560, NURS 4330, NURS 4340, NURS 4350, NURS 4360. A clinical practicum, pairing senior nursing students with RN preceptors practicing in various fields of nursing within the community. Areas of experience may include clinics, acute and critical care settings, long-term care, and hospice or palliative care. Emphasis placed on development of critical thinking/clinical reasoning, leadership skills, and the transition of student into the role of the professional nurse. 90 hours clinical/lab.

Subtotal: 16 Hours

Total hours in program: 120

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Nursing, B.S.N., Academic Map  

Cherese G. Brooks
Assistant Professor
Cherese.Brooks@mtsu.edu

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Lisa M. Cejka
Lecturer
Lisa.Cejka@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Cathy Cooper
Associate Professor
cathy.cooper@mtsu.edu

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Yvonne Marie Creighton
Lecturer
Yvonne.Creighton@mtsu.edu

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Michelle Finch
Assistant Professor
michelle.finch@mtsu.edu

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Joyce Anne Finch
Assistant Professor
Joyce.Finch@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Amanda Flagg
Assistant Professor
amanda.flagg@mtsu.edu

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Leigh Ann Krabousanos
Lecturer
Leigh.Krabousanos@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Barbara Whitman Lancaster
Assistant Professor
Barbara.Lancaster@mtsu.edu

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Brandi Lindsey
Assistant Professor
brandi.lindsey@mtsu.edu

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Tracy McCauley
Assistant Professor
tracy.mccauley@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Leigh Ann McInnis
Professor
leighann.mcinnis@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Richard Meeks
Assistant Professor
richard.meeks@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Shelley Moore
Assistant Professor
shelley.moore@mtsu.edu

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L. Kay Murphree
Assistant Professor
lisa.murphree@mtsu.edu

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Kristi Plunk
Assistant Professor
kristina.plunk@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Mark R. Reinhardt
Lecturer
Mark.Reinhardt@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Garret Salmon
Assistant Professor
Garrett.Salmon@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Jenny Sauls
Professor and Director, School of Nursing
jenny.sauls@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Sherri L. Stevens
Associate Professor
sherri.stevens@mtsu.edu

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William Todd Vickrey
Lecturer
Todd.Vickrey@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Karen Ward
Professor
karen.ward@mtsu.edu

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Mary K Wetsell
Assistant Professor
Katie.Wetsell@mtsu.edu

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Sharon Elizabeth Whiteside
Assistant Professor
Sharon.Whiteside@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Linda Wilson
Professor
linda.covington@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Timothy Lee Wilson
Lecturer
Timothy.Wilson@mtsu.edu

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Nursing

NURS 3000 - Professionalism in Nursing
1 credit hour credit

Exposes the novice nursing student to the profession of nursing. Concept of professionalism explored and related to nursing. Includes a brief historical review of nursing and nursing theories. Professional values, practice standards,informatics,  and communications with health care professional introduced. Legal implications for nursing explored.

NURS 3010 - Pathophysiology
3 credit hours

(Same as BIOL 3340.) Prerequisites: BIOL 2010/BIOL 2011, BIOL 2020/BIOL 2021, and BIOL 2230/BIOL 2231. Basic mechanisms of disease processes and their role in disrupting normal physiology. Three hours lecture.

NURS 3030 - Health Assessment
2 credit hours

Prerequisites: BIOL 2010/BIOL 2011 and BIOL 2020/BIOL 2021; accepted into upper-division nursing. Corequisite: NURS 3040. Principles and techniques required for the assessment and analysis of data (diagnosis). Normal assessment findings and selected abnormal findings studied. Cultural variations and assessment variations across the lifespan explored.

NURS 3040 - Health Assessment Laboratory
1 credit hour credit

Prerequisites: BIOL 2010/BIOL 2011 and BIOL 2020/BIOL 2021; accepted into upper-division nursing. Corequisite: NURS 3030. Opportunity to practice the basic principles and techniques required for the assessment and analysis of data (diagnosis). Normal assessment findings in the adult as well as selected abnormal findings studied. Cultural variations and assessment variations across the lifespan explored. Two-hour laboratory.

NURS 3111 - Professional Role Development
3 credit hours

Socializes the returning R.N. into the role of a baccalaureate nurse. Professionalism in nursing, role transition, history of nursing education, and issues pertinent to returning adult learners.

NURS 3170 - Clinical Pharmacology in Nursing
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: General Education Natural Science; BIOL 2230/BIOL 2231, BIOL 2010/BIOL 2011, BIOL 2020/BIOL 2021; NURS 3000, NURS 3010, NURS 3030, NURS 3040, NURS 3370. Knowledge and responsibility necessary for the assessment and monitoring of clients receiving pharmacotherapeutics. Three hours lecture.

NURS 3350 - Introduction to Nursing Practice
5 credit hours

Prerequisites: NURS 3000, NURS 3010, NURS 3030, NURS 3040, and NURS 3370. Corequisites: NURS 3170 and NURS 3360. Introduces nursing care concepts necessary to support basic care of clients across the lifespan; foundation for subsequent nursing courses. Five hours lecture.

NURS 3360 - Introduction to Nursing Practice-Clinical
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: NURS 3000, NURS 3010, NURS 3030, NURS 3040, and NURS 3370. Corequisites: NURS 3170 and NURS 3350. Nursing practice applied in laboratory and clinical settings. Six hours laboratory per week for duration of course.

NURS 3370 - Health and Gerontology
3 credit hours

Focuses on the normal aging process and related health care issues from an interdisciplinary perspective. Incorporates concepts of health promotion, prevention, and adaptation for those who are aging and their families. Three hours lecture.

NURS 3530 - Caring for Adult Clients I
5 credit hours

Prerequisites: NURS 3170, NURS 3350, NURS 3360, and NURS 3570. Corequisite: NURS 3540. Professional nursing care in a variety of settings for the adult client with simple and chronic health problems. Five hours lecture.

NURS 3540 - Caring for Adult Clients I-Clinical
4 credit hours

Prerequisites: NURS 3170, NURS 3350, NURS 3360, NURS 3570. Corequisite: NURS 3530 . Applying the nursing process in a clinical setting with the adult client experiencing acute and chronic health deviations. Twenty hours clinical/lab per week for duration of course.

NURS 3550 - Caring for the Childbearing Family
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: NURS 3170, NURS 3350, NURS 3360, and NURS 3570. Corequisite: NURS 3560. Incorporates the nursing process and critical thinking skills into the professional nursing care of the childbearing female and the family. Focuses on health promotion, prevention, and adaptation for the childbearing client. Three hours lecture.

NURS 3560 - Caring for the Childbearing Family-Clinical
2 credit hours

Prerequisites: NURS 3170, NURS 3350, NURS 3360, and NURS 3570. Corequisite: NURS 3550. Nursing process for applying the clinical application and principles of nursing and family theory to childbearing families. Focuses on health promotion, prevention, and adaptation for childbearing families. Sixteen hours clinical/lab per week for duration of course.

NURS 3570 - Health Care Research
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: NURS 3000, NURS 3010, NURS 3030, NURS 3040, NURS 3370. Explores the role of the professional nurse by utilizing systematic inquiry and analysis for problem solving and supporting evidence based practice for positive patient outcomes. Three hours lecture.

NURS 4005 - Independent Health Care Study
1 to 3 credit hours

Prerequisites: Admission to the upper division of the nursing program and permission of instructor. Allows the student to pursue individual interests in nursing by contracting with an instructor and documenting the plan of learning as well as its fulfillment. One to three lectures or two to six laboratory hours.

NURS 4035 - Special Topics in Nursing
3 credit hours

Explores selected nursing topics in depth. Specified topic offered each semester according to student interest and faculty availability. Can be taken for a maximum of nine hours.

NURS 4036 - Nursing's Image in the Media
3 credit hours

Explores the variety of images that the public, the media, and nurses hold of nurses and the nursing profession. Examines personal beliefs regarding these images and the influence these beliefs can play in major health care issues.

NURS 4037 - End-of-Life Care
3 credit hours

Focuses on the role of the nurse in end-of-life care across the lifespan and among cultures. Covers a wide range of topics and issues, incorporating a holistic perspective. Students explore their personal values, beliefs, and practices related to end-of-life.

NURS 4038 - Medical-Surgical Practicum
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: Admission to upper division nursing program; NURS 3530 and NURS 3540; and permission of instructor. Allows students to pursue individual interests in nursing by contracting with an instructor and documenting the plan of learning as well as its fulfillment. Six laboratory hours.

NURS 4039 - Health Care Issues and Trends
3 credit hours

Online course provides opportunities for examination and critical evaluation of significant issues and trends in the current health care environment.

NURS 4040 - Forensic Nursing
3 credit hours

Explores the issues and opportunities in the specialty of forensic nursing and provides an overview of many different roles and positions that nurses can assume, as well as basic information regarding forensic science.  

NURS 4055 - Informatics for the Health Care Professional
3 credit hours

Theoretical foundations of informatics for health care professionals. Examines information technology and tools on the Internet. Emphasis on impact of automated data management through information systems in health care.

NURS 4330 - Caring for Adult Clients II
5 credit hours

Prerequisites: NURS 3530, NURS 3540, NURS 3550, NURS 3560. Corequisite: NURS 4340. Incorporates the nursing process and critical thinking skills into the professional nursing care of the adult client experiencing complex, multi-system illness, failure, and trauma. Opportunities for the nursing student to combine acquired knowledge from previous nursing courses and courses from other disciplines with new phenomena encountered in a variety of high acuity care settings. Five hours lecture.

NURS 4340 - Caring for Adult Clients II-Clinical
4 credit hours

Prerequisites: NURS 3530, NURS 3540, NURS 3550, NURS 3560. Corequisite: NURS 4330. Opportunity for nursing students to integrate didactic and empirical knowledge and skills for clients with critical needs into the acute care setting. Understanding of complex, multi-system illness, failure, and trauma in providing nursing care. Twenty hours clinical/lab for duration of course.

NURS 4350 - Caring for Children and Teen Clients
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: NURS 3530, NURS 3540, NURS 3550, and NURS 3560. Corequisite: NURS 4360. Incorporates the nursing process and critical thinking skills into the professional nursing care of children, adolescents, and their families. Explores the principles of growth and development and family-centered care. Three hours lecture.

NURS 4360 - Caring for Children and Teen Clients-Clinical
2 credit hours

Prerequisites: NURS 3530, NURS 3540, NURS 3550, and NURS 3560. Corequisite: NURS 4350. Provides assistance in transferring knowledge to the implementation of nursing care of children, adolescents, teens, and their families in a variety of clinical settings. Sixteen hours clinical/lab per week for duration of course.

NURS 4530 - Caring for the Community as Client
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: NURS 4330, NURS 4340, NURS 4350, NURS 4360. Corequisites: NURS 4550 and NURS 4560. Opportunity for students to learn theoretical concepts and epidemiological principles related to health promotion and preventive services. Primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of prevention covered. Focuses on the work of an interdisciplinary health care team and concepts of nursing and public health when working with the individual, family, group, and community as client. Three hours lecture.

NURS 4550 - Caring for Clients with Mental Health Alterations
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: NURS 4330, NURS 4340, NURS 4350 and NURS 4360, and NURS 4530. Corequisite: NURS 4560. Opportunity for students to learn theoretical concepts relating to mental health and psychiatric nursing. Interpersonal and group communication, psychopathology, and legal and ethical issues explored. Methods used in providing nursing care for clients with alterations in mental health presented. Interdisciplinary health care team and its function in the psychiatric setting explored. Three hours lecture.

NURS 4560 - Community and Mental Health Clinical
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: NURS 4330, NURS 4340, NURS 4350, and NURS 4360. Corequisites: NURS 4530, and NURS 4550. Familiarizes the undergraduate nursing student with ways to care for aggregates. Emphasis on clients in the community and in in-patient psychiatric facilities. Clinical is 90 hours for the semester.

NURS 4570 - Professional Practice and Leadership
4 credit hours

Prerequisites: NURS 4330, NURS 4340, NURS 4350, and NURS 4360. Opportunity for students to examine and evaluate theoretical concepts relating to leadership and management in nursing. The learning experiences emphasize the development of strategies that enhance leadership capabilities including decision-making, managing conflict, using power, and delegating. Three hours lecture.

NURS 4590 - Capstone Clinical
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: NURS 3000, NURS 3010, NURS 3030, NURS 3040, NURS 3370, NURS 3350, NURS 3360, NURS 3570, NURS 3170, NURS 3530, NURS 3540, NURS 3550, NURS 3560, NURS 4330, NURS 4340, NURS 4350, NURS 4360. A clinical practicum, pairing senior nursing students with RN preceptors practicing in various fields of nursing within the community. Areas of experience may include clinics, acute and critical care settings, long-term care, and hospice or palliative care. Emphasis placed on development of critical thinking/clinical reasoning, leadership skills, and the transition of student into the role of the professional nurse.