Forensic Science

Though forensic science may not be as glamorous as shown on film and television, the field and its practitioners are on the front lines in the fight to put “justice” in the justice system. A joint offering by the departments of Biology, Chemistry, and Criminal Justice Administration, MTSU's Forensic Science program offers preparation to its graduates for advanced study in forensic science or employment in public crime laboratories, specialized private laboratories, and law enforcement agencies. It also helps students understand the role of the forensic scientist in the criminal justice systems, preparing them to present oral and written findings to the court.

This program is approved for the Academic Common Market.

MTSU Police Officer shaking hands with MTSU Student

A center of attraction

Though a relatively new program, MTSU's Forensic Science program has already made a name for itself, attracting a diverse group of degree seekers. For MTSU junior Jillian Bower, the program is the key to becoming a DNA analyst. “MTSU provides the scholarly investment, instrumental resources, and tangible experience that I need to emerge competent on the professional level,” Bowers says. For Brad McCrary, an early interest in becoming a doctor evolved into a fascination with the difficult medical mysteries that abound in Forensic Anthropology. He hopes to use a degree in Forensic Science as a stepping stone to medical school and, from there, a career as a medical examiner. “Forensics isn't for everyone,” McCrary says. “You have to have dedication, morals, and a strong stomach. But some people, like me, just stumble upon it and fall in love.”

Dr. Mengliang Zhang

Meet One of our new Forensic Science Faculty

Dr. Mengliang Zhang earned a B.S. in Pharmaceutical Engineering and an M.S. in Microbiological and Biochemical Pharmacy at the Research Center for Drug Metabolism, Jilin University in China. He then received his doctoral degree in Analytical Chemistry from Ohio University in 2015 under the guidance of Dr. Glen P. Jackson (West Virginia University) and Dr. Peter de B. Harrington. Following his graduate research, he joined the Food Composition and Methods Development Laboratory in the US Department of Agriculture as postdoctoral researcher.

At MTSU, Dr. Zhang’s research focuses on the development of in situ, real-time, high throughput, and low sample-consumption methods with minimal sample preparation for the trace analysis of forensic samples, food materials, and natural products. Mass spectrometry based instrumental analysis (e.g., UPLC-MS, DART-MS, flow injection MS) coupled with chemometrics are primarily used in his research for targeted and untargeted analysis, and these techniques can be widely applied to different areas such as food fraud detection, document verification and fingerprint identification, chemical composition profiling for counterfeit pharmaceutical tablets, distinction of ignitable liquids, and so on. He also will develop novel analytical methods and data processing strategies for the analysis of bioactive compounds (e.g., flavonoids and glucosinolates) in plant materials and/or traditional Chinese medicines. 

The continual advance in forensic technologies translates to a corresponding high demand for lab analysts. Career options exist with the federal, state and local law enforcement agencies, forensic laboratories, medical examiner offices, hospitals, military, private firms, and universities.

Student Achievement Information

Number of program graduates and number of students completing internships and research projects by academic year.

Academic Year

Internships

Research Projects

Graduates

2017-18*

6

5

9

2016-17

9

5

7

2015-16

8

9

8

2014-15

5

2

6

2013-14

5

1

6

2012-13

5

1

3

*estimated

Careers in Forensic Science Include

  • Crime lab technician
  • Crime scene manager
  • Criminalist
  • Evidence custodian
  • Firearms/Toolmark analyst
  • Forensic anthropologist
  • Forensic biologist
  • Forensic chemist
  • Forensic investigator (medical examiners' offices)
  • Forensic nurse/physician's assistant investigator
  • Forensic pathologist
  • Forensic photographer
  • Forensic scientist
  • Intelligence officer/analyst
  • Laboratory manager
  • Latent fingerprint examiner
  • Microanalysis
  • Police services support technician
  • Quality assurance director
  • Toxicologist

Employers of MTSU Forensic Science Alumni Include

  • Aegis Sciences Corporation
  • Covenant Pathology Services Laboratory (CPS)
  • District 4 Medical Examiner's Office (Jacksonville, FL)
  • Laboratory Corporation of America (LabCorp)
  • Metro Nashville Police Department Crime Laboratory
  • PathGroup
  • Tennessee Bureau of Investigation (TBI)
  • TestAmerica
  • Vi-Jon

Students interested in a degree in Forensic Science, an interdisciplinary major offered by the departments of Biology, Chemistry, and Criminal Justice Administration can pursue a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree. The program is housed in the College of Basic and Applied Sciences, 

For complete curriculum details, click on the REQUIREMENTS tab above.

Forensic Science, B.S.

Dr. Frank Bailey, director
SCI 2026
615-898-5483
Frank.Bailey@mtsu.edu
Suzanne Hicks, advisor
Suzanne.Hicks@mtsu.edu

www.mtsu.edu/forensicscience/

The interdisciplinary major in Forensic Science consists of a strong interdisciplinary curriculum within the Departments of Biology, Chemistry, and Criminal Justice. The goals of the Forensic Science major are to provide a strong academic foundation that offers preparation for advanced study in forensic science or employment in public crime laboratories, specialized private laboratories, and law enforcement agencies; to understand the role of the forensic scientist in the criminal justice system and offer preparation to present oral and written findings to the court; and to provide student interaction with current forensic practitioners through seminars and internships.

Forensic Science is the application of techniques and principles of the natural and physical sciences to the analysis of evidence collected during criminal investigations. Career options exist with the federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies, forensic laboratories, medical examiner offices, hospitals, military, private firms, and universities.

No minor is required since this degree is highly interdisciplinary. The requirements for a major in Forensic Science can be obtained from an advisor of the program.

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Forensic Science, B.S., Academic Map  

Degree Requirements

General Education (41 hours)

General Education requirements (shown in curricular listings below) include courses in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences.

The following General Education courses are required for this major:

  • MATH 1910 (Math)
  • BIOL 1110/1111 (Nat Sci)
  • CHEM 1110/1111 (Nat Sci)

Major Requirements (73 hours)

  • BIOL 1110 - General Biology I  4 credit hours  (4 credits may be counted in General Education) 

    BIOL 1110 - General Biology I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with C- or better of MATH ACT of 19 or higher. Corequisite: BIOL 1111. Primarily for Biology majors and minors and other science-oriented students. Biological principles and processes, including introduction to the nature of science, cells (structure, function, metabolism, division), genetics, evolution, viruses, bacteria, protists, and fungi. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory. While BIOL 1110 can be used to fulfill half the 8-hour General Education requirement for Natural Sciences, it is the first semester of a two-semester sequence primarily designed for science majors. TBR Common Course: BIOL 1110

  • BIOL 1120 - General Biology II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111. Corequisite: BIOL 1121. Primarily for Biology majors and minors and other science-oriented students. Survey of plants and animals emphasizing evolution, structure, function, reproduction, growth, and ecology. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory. TBR Common Course: BIOL 1120

  • BIOL 2230 - Microbiology  4 credit hours  

    BIOL 2230 - Microbiology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111 and BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121 or BIOL 2010/BIOL 2011 and BIOL 2020/BIOL 2021. Concepts and techniques pertaining to the morphology, physiology, reproduction, isolation, cultivation and identification of microorganisms with particular emphasis on bacteria. Topics include the impact of microorganisms in our daily lives, both adverse and beneficial. Background in General Chemistry is strongly recommended. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • BIOL 3250 - Genetics  4 credit hours  

    BIOL 3250 - Genetics

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111 and  BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121. Corequisite: BIOL 3251. An introductory course in genetics. Surveys and explores the sub-disciplines of genetics, including classical, molecular, and evolutionary genetics. Emphasis on the experiments, techniques, and theories forming the foundation of modern genetic research and its applications. Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory.

  • BIOL 4110 - General Physiology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 3250/BIOL 3251; CHEM 2030/CHEM 2031 or CHEM 3010 /CHEM 3011. Corequisite: BIOL 4111. Physiological and chemical properties of life processes in animals using an organ systems approach. Emphasis on mammalian physiology. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • FSBI 4300 - Immunology  4 credit hours  

    FSBI 4300 - Immunology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: BIOL 2230/BIOL 2231; CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111, CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121. Corequisite: FSBI 4301 . Instruction in theory and application of humoral and cellular mechanisms of immunity. Emphasis on understanding the mechanisms by which we respond to disease-causing organisms, allergens, self antigens, as well as the importance of immunology techniques in scientific research, clinical laboratory science, and forensic science. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.  

  • FSBI 4550 - Biotechnology  3 credit hours  

    FSBI 4550 - Biotechnology

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111, BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121, BIOL 2230/BIOL 2231; CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111, CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121 . Instruction in both the theory and application of current research methodologies in molecular biology including their forensic science application. Topics include DNA/RNA isolation, recombinant DNA methods, polymerase chain reaction, DNA sequencing, DNA fingerprinting, protein purification, and immunochemistry. Five hours lecture/laboratory.  

  • CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I  4 credit hours  (4 credits may  be counted in General Education) 

    CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: High school chemistry. Corequisite: CHEM 1111. Fundamental concepts of atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometric relationships, periodic properties of the elements, thermochemistry, and properties of gases. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory. TBR Common Course: CHEM 1110

  • CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Corequisite: CHEM 1121. Chemical equilibrium, solid and liquid states of matter, chemistry of acids and bases, principles of chemical kinetics, precipitation reactions, elementary thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory. TBR Common Course: CHEM 1120

  • CHEM 2230 - Quantitative Analysis

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121 with minimum grade of C- (or equivalent course). Corequisite: CHEM 2231. Gravimetric, volumetric, optical, and electrochemical analysis with examples from clinical chemistry, water pollution chemistry, occupational health and safety, and industrial chemistry. Three hours lecture.

  • CHEM 2231 - Quantitative Analysis Lab

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in CHEM 1120 or equivalent course. Corequisite: CHEM 2230 recommended, but not required. Laboratory course in classical wet chemical analysis; two three-hour laboratory periods per week.

  • CHEM 3010 - Organic Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121 or equivalent. Corequisite: CHEM 3011. Types of carbon compounds, their nomenclature, reactions, and physical properties. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • CHEM 3020 - Organic Chemistry II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 3010. Corequisite: CHEM 3021. A continuation of CHEM 3010. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • FSCH 3530 - Principles of Biochemistry

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CHEM 2030/CHEM 2031 or CHEM 3010/CHEM 3011. Corequisite: FSCH 3531. Structure, properties, and functions of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nuclei acids and their reactions in living organisms. Three hours lecture and one three-hour lab.

  • FSCH 4230 - Instrumental Analysis in Forensic Science

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 2230/CHEM 2231 and CHEM 2030/CHEM 2031 or CHEM 3020/CHEM 3021. Corequisite:FSCH 4231 . Potentiometric titration, polargraphic, coulometric gas, chromatographic, ultraviolet, visible and infrared absorption, and atomic absorption techniques of analysis. Requirements and limitations of each technique for obtaining quantitative measurements; applications to various chemical systems from both theoretical and experimental standpoints. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • FSCJ 4330 - Criminal Investigations

    3 credit hours

    (Same as CJA 4330.) Prerequisites: Forensic Science major. General investigative responsibilities and techniques including administration, preparation, investigative jurisdiction and responsibility, and the importance of substantive report writing. Three hours lecture

  • FSCJ 4340 - Crime Scene Investigation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: FSCJ 4330 or CJA 4330. Advanced approach to the various elements of criminal investigations. Provides simulated investigative experiences through the use of mock crime scenes. Three hours lecture.

  • FRSC 3010 - Forensics Junior Seminar

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 3250 /BIOL 3251; CHEM 3010 /CHEM 3011; FSCJ 2400 or FSCJ 4330 or  FSCJ 4340 or FSCJ 4530. Junior standing or permission of program advisor. Discussions of issues relating to forensic science with frequent expert lecturers in the field. Two hours lecture.  

  • FRSC 4010 - Forensics Senior Seminar

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisites: FRSC 3010 and senior standing. Practical experiences in the treatment of evidence with a mock crime scene, collection and preservation of evidence, forensic analysis, record maintenance, and courtroom testimony. Two hours lecture.  

  • FRSC 4020 - Forensics Internship

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Permission of program advisor. A supervised laboratory experience for advanced students in an off-campus professional setting.  

 

  • FSCJ 4530 - Criminal Evidence and Procedures

    3 credit hours

    (Same as CJA 4530.) Designed to develop an understanding of the types of individuals and problems of admissibility in court proceedings; the proper treatment and disposition of evidence; the legal procedure to be followed; and the actual trial procedure. Three hours lecture.

  • FSCJ 2400 - Judicial Process  3 credit hours  

    FSCJ 2400 - Judicial Process

    3 credit hours

    (Same as CJA 2400.) The structure and function of the judicial system; the major problems and needs of the judicial segment of the criminal justice system; major emphasis on the basic concepts of criminal law and administration. Three hours lecture.

Supporting Courses (14 hours)

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  (3 credit hours counted in General Education, 1 credit hour remaining) 

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required. TBR Common Course: MATH 1910

  • BIOL 4350 - Biometry  4 credit hours  

    BIOL 4350 - Biometry

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 3250/BIOL 3251 and MATH 1910. Corequisite: BIOL 4351. Statistical methods utilized in biological research. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730 or MATH 1910. Required corequisite: PHYS 2011. Web-based discussion class to be taken in conjunction with cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2011. Classical mechanics traditionally covered in a first-semester college physics course. Kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Class time used for discussion of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams. TBR Common Course: PHYS 2010

  • PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730 or MATH 1910. Required corequisite: PHYS 2010. Group-oriented problems course taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2010. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2010 discussion class. Covers kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions. TBR Common Course: PHYS 2011

  • PHYS 2020 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics II

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2021. Web-based discussion class taken in conjunction with the cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2021. Fundamentals of optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. Scheduled class time is used for discussions of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams. TBR Common Course: PHYS 2020

  • PHYS 2021 - Physics Problems Laboratory II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2020. Group-oriented problems course to be taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2020. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2020 discussion class. Optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. The skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions. TBR Common Course: PHYS 2021

  • Elective 1 credit hour

Total hours in program: 120

Curriculum: Forensic Science

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

Freshman

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)  (Comm) 

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)  (Comm) 

    ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  (Math)  (Math) 

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required. TBR Common Course: MATH 1910

  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours

 

  • BIOL 1110 - General Biology I  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci) AND  (Nat Sci) AND 

    BIOL 1110 - General Biology I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with C- or better of MATH ACT of 19 or higher. Corequisite: BIOL 1111. Primarily for Biology majors and minors and other science-oriented students. Biological principles and processes, including introduction to the nature of science, cells (structure, function, metabolism, division), genetics, evolution, viruses, bacteria, protists, and fungi. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory. While BIOL 1110 can be used to fulfill half the 8-hour General Education requirement for Natural Sciences, it is the first semester of a two-semester sequence primarily designed for science majors. TBR Common Course: BIOL 1110

  • BIOL 1111 - General Biology I Lab  0 credit hours  (Nat Sci)  (Nat Sci) 

    BIOL 1111 - General Biology I Lab

    0 credit hours

    Corequisite: BIOL 1110. TBR Common Course: BIOL 1111

 

  • BIOL 1120 - General Biology II  4 credit hours  AND  AND 

    BIOL 1120 - General Biology II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111. Corequisite: BIOL 1121. Primarily for Biology majors and minors and other science-oriented students. Survey of plants and animals emphasizing evolution, structure, function, reproduction, growth, and ecology. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory. TBR Common Course: BIOL 1120

 

  • CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I  4 credit hours  AND  AND 

    CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: High school chemistry. Corequisite: CHEM 1111. Fundamental concepts of atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometric relationships, periodic properties of the elements, thermochemistry, and properties of gases. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory. TBR Common Course: CHEM 1110

 

  • CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II  4 credit hours  AND  AND 

    CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Corequisite: CHEM 1121. Chemical equilibrium, solid and liquid states of matter, chemistry of acids and bases, principles of chemical kinetics, precipitation reactions, elementary thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory. TBR Common Course: CHEM 1120

Subtotal: 29 Hours

Sophomore

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR  (Hum/FA) OR 

    ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR  (Hum/FA) OR 

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA)  (Hum/FA) 

    HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

 

  • FSCJ 4330 - Criminal Investigations

    3 credit hours

    (Same as CJA 4330.) Prerequisites: Forensic Science major. General investigative responsibilities and techniques including administration, preparation, investigative jurisdiction and responsibility, and the importance of substantive report writing. Three hours lecture

  • FSCJ 4340 - Crime Scene Investigation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: FSCJ 4330 or CJA 4330. Advanced approach to the various elements of criminal investigations. Provides simulated investigative experiences through the use of mock crime scenes. Three hours lecture.

 

  • BIOL 2230 - Microbiology  4 credit hours  AND  AND 

    BIOL 2230 - Microbiology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111 and BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121 or BIOL 2010/BIOL 2011 and BIOL 2020/BIOL 2021. Concepts and techniques pertaining to the morphology, physiology, reproduction, isolation, cultivation and identification of microorganisms with particular emphasis on bacteria. Topics include the impact of microorganisms in our daily lives, both adverse and beneficial. Background in General Chemistry is strongly recommended. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • BIOL 3250 - Genetics  4 credit hours  AND  AND 

    BIOL 3250 - Genetics

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111 and  BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121. Corequisite: BIOL 3251. An introductory course in genetics. Surveys and explores the sub-disciplines of genetics, including classical, molecular, and evolutionary genetics. Emphasis on the experiments, techniques, and theories forming the foundation of modern genetic research and its applications. Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory.

 

  • CHEM 2230 - Quantitative Analysis  3 credit hours  AND  AND 

    CHEM 2230 - Quantitative Analysis

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121 with minimum grade of C- (or equivalent course). Corequisite: CHEM 2231. Gravimetric, volumetric, optical, and electrochemical analysis with examples from clinical chemistry, water pollution chemistry, occupational health and safety, and industrial chemistry. Three hours lecture.

  • CHEM 2231 - Quantitative Analysis Lab

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in CHEM 1120 or equivalent course. Corequisite: CHEM 2230 recommended, but not required. Laboratory course in classical wet chemical analysis; two three-hour laboratory periods per week.

 

  • CHEM 3010 - Organic Chemistry I  4 credit hours  AND  AND 

    CHEM 3010 - Organic Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121 or equivalent. Corequisite: CHEM 3011. Types of carbon compounds, their nomenclature, reactions, and physical properties. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I  0 credit hours  (Nat Sci) AND  (Nat Sci) AND 

    PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730 or MATH 1910. Required corequisite: PHYS 2011. Web-based discussion class to be taken in conjunction with cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2011. Classical mechanics traditionally covered in a first-semester college physics course. Kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Class time used for discussion of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams. TBR Common Course: PHYS 2010

  • PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci)  (Nat Sci) 

    PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730 or MATH 1910. Required corequisite: PHYS 2010. Group-oriented problems course taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2010. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2010 discussion class. Covers kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions. TBR Common Course: PHYS 2011

Subtotal: 30 Hours

Junior

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication  3 credit hours  (Comm)  (Comm) 

    COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement. TBR Common Course: COMM 2025

  • FRSC 3010 - Forensics Junior Seminar

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 3250 /BIOL 3251; CHEM 3010 /CHEM 3011; FSCJ 2400 or FSCJ 4330 or  FSCJ 4340 or FSCJ 4530. Junior standing or permission of program advisor. Discussions of issues relating to forensic science with frequent expert lecturers in the field. Two hours lecture.  

  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours

 

  • CHEM 3020 - Organic Chemistry II  4 credit hours  AND  AND 

    CHEM 3020 - Organic Chemistry II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 3010. Corequisite: CHEM 3021. A continuation of CHEM 3010. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • PHYS 2020 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics II  0 credit hours  AND  AND 

    PHYS 2020 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics II

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2021. Web-based discussion class taken in conjunction with the cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2021. Fundamentals of optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. Scheduled class time is used for discussions of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams. TBR Common Course: PHYS 2020

  • PHYS 2021 - Physics Problems Laboratory II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2020. Group-oriented problems course to be taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2020. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2020 discussion class. Optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. The skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions. TBR Common Course: PHYS 2021

 

  • FSCJ 2400 - Judicial Process  3 credit hours  OR  OR 

    FSCJ 2400 - Judicial Process

    3 credit hours

    (Same as CJA 2400.) The structure and function of the judicial system; the major problems and needs of the judicial segment of the criminal justice system; major emphasis on the basic concepts of criminal law and administration. Three hours lecture.

  • FSCJ 4530 - Criminal Evidence and Procedures

    3 credit hours

    (Same as CJA 4530.) Designed to develop an understanding of the types of individuals and problems of admissibility in court proceedings; the proper treatment and disposition of evidence; the legal procedure to be followed; and the actual trial procedure. Three hours lecture.

 

  • FSCH 3530 - Principles of Biochemistry  4 credit hours  AND  AND 

    FSCH 3530 - Principles of Biochemistry

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CHEM 2030/CHEM 2031 or CHEM 3010/CHEM 3011. Corequisite: FSCH 3531. Structure, properties, and functions of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nuclei acids and their reactions in living organisms. Three hours lecture and one three-hour lab.

 

  • FSCH 4230 - Instrumental Analysis in Forensic Science

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 2230/CHEM 2231 and CHEM 2030/CHEM 2031 or CHEM 3020/CHEM 3021. Corequisite:FSCH 4231 . Potentiometric titration, polargraphic, coulometric gas, chromatographic, ultraviolet, visible and infrared absorption, and atomic absorption techniques of analysis. Requirements and limitations of each technique for obtaining quantitative measurements; applications to various chemical systems from both theoretical and experimental standpoints. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • FSBI 4300 - Immunology  4 credit hours  AND  AND 

    FSBI 4300 - Immunology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: BIOL 2230/BIOL 2231; CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111, CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121. Corequisite: FSBI 4301 . Instruction in theory and application of humoral and cellular mechanisms of immunity. Emphasis on understanding the mechanisms by which we respond to disease-causing organisms, allergens, self antigens, as well as the importance of immunology techniques in scientific research, clinical laboratory science, and forensic science. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.  

Subtotal: 31 Hours

Senior

  • FRSC 4010 - Forensics Senior Seminar

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisites: FRSC 3010 and senior standing. Practical experiences in the treatment of evidence with a mock crime scene, collection and preservation of evidence, forensic analysis, record maintenance, and courtroom testimony. Two hours lecture.  

  • FRSC 4020 - Forensics Internship

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Permission of program advisor. A supervised laboratory experience for advanced students in an off-campus professional setting.  

  • FSBI 4550 - Biotechnology  3 credit hours  

    FSBI 4550 - Biotechnology

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111, BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121, BIOL 2230/BIOL 2231; CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111, CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121 . Instruction in both the theory and application of current research methodologies in molecular biology including their forensic science application. Topics include DNA/RNA isolation, recombinant DNA methods, polymerase chain reaction, DNA sequencing, DNA fingerprinting, protein purification, and immunochemistry. Five hours lecture/laboratory.  

  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours
  • Elective 1 credit hour

 

  • BIOL 4350 - Biometry  4 credit hours  AND  AND 

    BIOL 4350 - Biometry

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 3250/BIOL 3251 and MATH 1910. Corequisite: BIOL 4351. Statistical methods utilized in biological research. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • BIOL 4110 - General Physiology  4 credit hours  AND  AND 

    BIOL 4110 - General Physiology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 3250/BIOL 3251; CHEM 2030/CHEM 2031 or CHEM 3010 /CHEM 3011. Corequisite: BIOL 4111. Physiological and chemical properties of life processes in animals using an organ systems approach. Emphasis on mammalian physiology. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

Choose 6 hours from:

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020. TBR Common Course: HIST 2010

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020. TBR Common Course: HIST 2020

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement. TBR Common Course: HIST 2030

Subtotal: 30 Hours

Forensic Science

FRSC 3010 - Forensics Junior Seminar
2 credit hours

Prerequisites: BIOL 3250 /BIOL 3251; CHEM 3010 /CHEM 3011; FSCJ 2400 or FSCJ 4330 or  FSCJ 4340 or FSCJ 4530. Junior standing or permission of program advisor. Discussions of issues relating to forensic science with frequent expert lecturers in the field. Two hours lecture.  

FRSC 4010 - Forensics Senior Seminar
2 credit hours

Prerequisites: FRSC 3010 and senior standing. Practical experiences in the treatment of evidence with a mock crime scene, collection and preservation of evidence, forensic analysis, record maintenance, and courtroom testimony. Two hours lecture.  

FRSC 4020 - Forensics Internship
4 credit hours

Prerequisite: Permission of program advisor. A supervised laboratory experience for advanced students in an off-campus professional setting.  

Forensic Science - Biology

FSBI 4300 - Immunology
4 credit hours

Prerequisite: BIOL 2230/BIOL 2231; CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111, CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121. Corequisite: FSBI 4301 . Instruction in theory and application of humoral and cellular mechanisms of immunity. Emphasis on understanding the mechanisms by which we respond to disease-causing organisms, allergens, self antigens, as well as the importance of immunology techniques in scientific research, clinical laboratory science, and forensic science. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.  

FSBI 4301 - Immunology Lab
0 credit hours

Corequisite: FSBI 4300.  

FSBI 4550 - Biotechnology
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111, BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121, BIOL 2230/BIOL 2231; CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111, CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121 . Instruction in both the theory and application of current research methodologies in molecular biology including their forensic science application. Topics include DNA/RNA isolation, recombinant DNA methods, polymerase chain reaction, DNA sequencing, DNA fingerprinting, protein purification, and immunochemistry. Five hours lecture/laboratory.  

Forensic Science - Chemistry

FSCH 3530 - Principles of Biochemistry
4 credit hours

Prerequisites: CHEM 2030/CHEM 2031 or CHEM 3010/CHEM 3011. Corequisite: FSCH 3531. Structure, properties, and functions of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nuclei acids and their reactions in living organisms. Three hours lecture and one three-hour lab.

FSCH 3531 - Principles of Biochemistry Lab
0 credit hours

Corequisite: FSCH 3530.  

FSCH 4230 - Instrumental Analysis in Forensic Science
4 credit hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 2230/CHEM 2231 and CHEM 2030/CHEM 2031 or CHEM 3020/CHEM 3021. Corequisite:FSCH 4231 . Potentiometric titration, polargraphic, coulometric gas, chromatographic, ultraviolet, visible and infrared absorption, and atomic absorption techniques of analysis. Requirements and limitations of each technique for obtaining quantitative measurements; applications to various chemical systems from both theoretical and experimental standpoints. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

FSCH 4231 - Instrumental Analysis in Forensic Science Lab
0 credit hours

Corequisite: FSCH 4230.  

Forensic Science - Criminal Justice

FSCJ 2400 - Judicial Process
3 credit hours

(Same as CJA 2400.) The structure and function of the judicial system; the major problems and needs of the judicial segment of the criminal justice system; major emphasis on the basic concepts of criminal law and administration. Three hours lecture.

FSCJ 4330 - Criminal Investigations
3 credit hours

(Same as CJA 4330.) Prerequisites: Forensic Science major. General investigative responsibilities and techniques including administration, preparation, investigative jurisdiction and responsibility, and the importance of substantive report writing. Three hours lecture

FSCJ 4340 - Crime Scene Investigation
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: FSCJ 4330 or CJA 4330. Advanced approach to the various elements of criminal investigations. Provides simulated investigative experiences through the use of mock crime scenes. Three hours lecture.

FSCJ 4530 - Criminal Evidence and Procedures
3 credit hours

(Same as CJA 4530.) Designed to develop an understanding of the types of individuals and problems of admissibility in court proceedings; the proper treatment and disposition of evidence; the legal procedure to be followed; and the actual trial procedure. Three hours lecture.

Student Handbook



Forms

Links

Complaints and Concerns

If a student has a complaint or concern about the program, we suggest the following steps be followed:

  1. Address the issue with the other party involved, if appropriate.
  2. Reach out to a contact within the Forensic Science program.
    Forensic Science Program Director
    Dr. Frank Bailey
    Frank.Bailey@mtsu.edu
    615-898-5483
  3. If a student does not feel their issue has been resolved after completing steps 1 and 2 - or does not feel comfortable discussing their situation within the Program, he/she is encouraged to contact the Dean of Basic and Applied Sciences.
    Dr. Robert Fischer
    basdean@mtsu.edu
    615-898-2613


     

 

 

Contact and Student Information

Dr. Frank Bailey, Director
Frank.Bailey@mtsu.edu
615-898-5483


biology@mtsu.edu
615-898-2847

Suzanne Hicks
Suzanne.Hicks@mtsu.edu
615-898-2196 | DSB 120

Forensic Science Program
Department of Biology
Middle Tennessee State University
MTSU Box 60
1301 East Main Street
Murfreesboro, TN 37132

Request Information








If you are a citizen of a European Union country, the following is important information regarding data security.

MTSU collects, and may share, personally identifying information and other data about you, including, but not limited to, your photo and IP address. Information may be shared with MTSU offices, as well as with federal financial aid agencies and other United States agencies.

Examples of MTSU Departments

  • Business Office
  • Financial Aid Office
  • Registrar
  • University’s alumni office
  • Student Health Services
  • Counseling and Testing Services
  • Campus Pharmacy
  • Disability & Access Center
  • Lightning Job Source/Career Development
  • TRIO;
  • Child Care Lab
  • CUSTOMS/new student orientation

Examples of Data Collected

Students / Student Applicants

  • Name
  • Mailing and current address
  • Phone number
  • Social Security Number
  • Birthdate
  • Make, model, and license plate number of vehicle (if you own a car and plan to park on campus)
  • Family income
  • Citizenship status
  • Birthplace
  • Years lived in the US
  • Whether you intend to apply for need or merit based financial aid
  • Academic major and interests
  • Education
  • Legal Guardian name, email, and address (if applicable)
  • Extracurricular activities
  • Work experience

Employees / Employee Applicants

  • Past employment
  • Past and current addresses
  • Educational background and degrees/certificates earned
  • Social Security number
  • Birthdate
  • Signature acknowledgment
  • Citizenship


Student information is protected under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974.  We will not disclose student information without your written consent, except in cases where we are required to do so by order of the court, police, or other government agency for public health, homeland security, investigatory purposes, or other exceptions provided under FERPA.

We do not sell your information to third parties, but we may release your information to outside vendors who partner with us to provide services to our students or employees. In addition, certain personally identifiable information is available in public sources (e.g. campus directory).  Directory information for students that is available to the public includes first and last name, address, work telephone number, email address, and general education credentials. Directory information for students and information about employees is also available to the public via the Tennessee Open Records Act.

If you have a concern about the information we collect, please contact the Data Protection Officer at dpo@mtsu.edu for assistance.  Additionally, employees may also contact MTSU’s Human Resource Services office.

You have the right to withdraw your consent or to opt out of our data collection processes at any time.

Do you consent to the agreement above?

Yes No

MTSU True Blue Preview: Forensic Science

Though forensic science may not be as glamorous as shown on film and television, the field and its p... [more]

2018 MTSU Campus Tour

From the acclaimed academic programs and state-of-the-art facilities to MTSU campus life and our thr... [more]