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  • Construction Management
    Majors can choose among commercial, electrical, or residential construction
  • Construction Management
    Industry involvement assures that the program stays current
  • Construction Management
    Second Lt. Kimberly Isham earned a B.S. in Construction Management
  • Construction Management
    This class is learning about surveying a property boundary

Construction Management

Owning a home or a business has been part of the American Dream since the country's founding. But residences and office parks don't build themselves. At MTSU, students learn the wide range of skills it takes to help provide the homes, communities, office buildings, and other construction projects that are the literal foundation of the American Dream.

This program is approved for the Academic Common Market.

Competing to learn

Competing to learn

The phrase “Residential Construction Management Competition” may be mouthful, but for students seeking a degree in Construction Management, the annual national contest presents an unequalled opportunity. Members of the competition team learn firsthand what it takes to put together a winning development proposal. During the last decade, MTSU's team has been dominant, placing at least in the top nine and winning the competition outright in 2007 and 2012.

Calling all women

Calling all women

In many science and engineering fields, female students too often overlook the opportunities and pay potential. That is true of the jobs available to graduates with a degree in Construction Management. “As a woman home builder and land developer, I have found that home building is a truly rewarding career in so many ways, not the least of which is earning potential,” says Peggy Krebs, president of Elite Homes and one of the industry's many supporters of the program. The path to that earning potential and career satisfaction starts right here.

A degree in Construction Management prepares students for entry-level careers in land development and residential home building construction industry. Examples include

  • Construction business manager
  • Construction foreman
  • Construction materials salesperson
  • Construction superintendent
  • Electrical contractor
  • Electrical materials and equipment salesperson
  • Estimator
  • Homeowner's warranty manager
  • Land development manager
  • Land development sales and marketing
  • Mechanical contractor
  • PreFab housing industry builder
  • Project manager
  • Purchaser
  • Quality control manager

Employers of MTSU alumni include

  • Barlow Exteriors
  • Batson Homes
  • Beazer Homes
  • CPS Land
  • Civil Constructors
  • Farmers Insurance
  • Goodall Homes
  • Grant New Homes
  • Huskey Truss
  • Magnolia Homes
  • Regent Homes
  • TDK Construction
  • TVA
  • Tennessee Valley Homes
  • The Jones Company
  • The Pulte Group

Students in the Construction Management program can pursue a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree with a concentration in Commercial Construction Management, Electrical Construction Management, or Land Development/Residential Building Construction Management.

Other departmental majors leading to a B.S. include Engineering Technology with three concentrations: Computer Engineering Technology, Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology, or Mechanical Engineering Technology and Environmental Sustainability and Technology

Interested students may take courses in Pre-engineering and Pre-architecture.

Undergraduate minors available include Electronics, Engineering Systems, Engineering Technology, and Construction Management.

Graduate students can pursue a Master of Science (M.S.) degree in either Engineering Technology or Occupational Health and Safety.

Electrical Construction Land Development/Residential Building Construction   Commercial Construction Management Pre-Architecture


Construction Management, Electrical Construction Management Concentration, B.S.

Department of Engineering Technology 
615-898-2776
David Hatfield, program coordinator
David.Hatfiel@mtsu.edu

The Construction Management major is a broad-based program designed to prepare students for positions in the construction industry. Corporate and private construction companies seek graduates to fill job positions in the field and in management. Students may select from three concentrations: Land Development/Residential Building Construction Management, Electrical Construction Management, and Commercial Construction Management. The merging of a strong technical background with the ability to lead personnel and manage systems produces a graduate who is invaluable to the construction industry.

The Electrical Construction Management concentration is a result of the collective efforts of the National Joint Apprenticeship Training Committee (NJATC), the National Electrical Contractors Association, the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Pellissippi State Community College, and Middle Tennessee State University to establish this program nationwide. Typically, students transfer to MTSU to complete 33 hours of distance learning and receive advanced credit to finish their degrees. It is possible for a student who is or is not seeking a journeyman's license to start taking courses at MTSU or online their freshman year. If a student wants to become an electrical journeyman, an interview with MTSU's construction advisor for Electrical Construction Management program and NJATC educational director can be arranged. Availability of space will be deciding factors as to when a student can start training. A four-year degree in this concentration will provide a strong background in technical and management skills to help graduates obtain middle management positions in the electrical construction management field.

Curriculum: Construction Management, Electrical Construction Management

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

Students should consult their advisors each semester to plan their schedules.

Freshman

 

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • MATH 1710 - College Algebra  3 credit hours  (Math)

    MATH 1710 - College Algebra

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: DSPM 0850 or two years of high school algebra; a Math Enhanced ACT 19 or greater or COMPASS placement. Course satisfies the General Education Mathematics requirement. Topics include functions--linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic; analysis of graphs; linear systems; inequalities; counting principles; and probability. Graphing calculator required. Course may be taken by correspondence. Not open to those who have had MATH 1730.

  • MATH 1720 - Plane Trigonometry

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Strong background in algebra recommended. Trigonometric functions of the acute and general angle, circular functions, graphs of trigonometric and inverse functions, identities, solutions of right and general triangles, equations, complex numbers, and vectors. Not open to those who have had MATH 1730. Graphing calculator required.

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours
  • CMT 1100 - Introduction to Construction Systems

    3 credit hours

    Introduces the major systems encountered when managing construction. Includes those operations of the residential and commercial construction industry, their similarities and how they differ in scope and daily practice. Basic entry-level plan reading skills, specifications, estimating and scheduling concepts incorporated as part of the business management functions pertaining to the construction industry. Seminar style to include student research, guest lecturers, and potential site visits. Required for graduation in Construction Management and should be taken prior to beginning CM upper-division coursework.

  • ET 2310 - Computer-Assisted Drafting and Design I

    3 credit hours

    Covers basic technical drawing/sketching and drafting concepts using personal computers, plotters, and appropriate CAD software. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.  

 

  • PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2011. Web-based discussion class to be taken in conjunction with cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2011. Classical mechanics traditionally covered in a first-semester college physics course. Kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Class time used for discussion of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2010. Group-oriented problems course taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2010. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2010 discussion class. Covers kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

OR

  • PHYS 1110 - Discovering Physics

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710, MATH 1730, or MATH 1630. Uncovers the fundamental concepts of physics in a hands-on approach that involves observations, measurements, forming hypotheses, and validation of ideas in groups of students' peers. Combined lecture/laboratory sessions.

Subtotal: 31 Hours

 

Sophomore

 

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

 

  • CMT 3210 - Residential Codes, Regulations, Specifications, and Plan Reading

    3 credit hours

    The residential and subdivision infrastructure construction language for plan reading, codes, regulations, and specifications. Lectures and hands-on activities. Industry will provide guest lecturers and show examples of some of their work in the field. Students will be required to visit architects, city and county codes department representatives, and contractors during the semester.

  • ET 3610 - Introduction to Electricity and Electronics

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 or MATH 1730. Orientation to direct current, alternating current, magnetism, filters, and semiconductor devices. Rectifier-filters and basic transistor amplifiers are also examined as representative electronic circuits. Use of meters, oscilloscopes, and other test instruments are stressed in the laboratory. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3620 - Digital Circuits Fundamentals

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3601 or permission of instructor. Provides thorough coverage of basic digital electronic circuits analysis and design. TTL and CMOS families examined. Number systems, mapping, and minimization techniques covered. Digital design using random logic and programmable logic devices (FPGAs and CPLDs). Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences (ECON 2410 recommended) 3 credit hours
  • Electives 6 credit hours
  • Natural Science 4 credit hours

 

  • SPAN 1010 - Elementary Spanish I

    3 credit hours

    A foundation course in reading, writing, speaking Spanish with an emphasis on conversation.

  • SPAN 1015 - Spanish for Concrete and Construction Management

    3 credit hours

    Introduces basic Spanish vocabulary and grammar with specific emphasis on facilitating communication, improving productivity, and promoting safety in the concrete and construction work environment. Cannot be used as prerequisite for SPAN 1020. Open only to majors and minors in Concrete Industry Management and Construction Management Technology.

Subtotal: 32 Hours

 

Junior

 

  • CMT 3155 - Land Development and Residential Building

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior status or permission of department. Online course for land development and infrastructure layout. House plans, methods, and techniques used in building conventional structure. Recommended for those desiring general knowledge as a consumer of residential construction. (Required for Electrical Construction Management concentration. Land Development/Residential Building Construction Management major or minor students cannot use this course to replace CMT 3150.)

  • CMT 3160 - Cost Estimating I  3 credit hours  

    CMT 3160 - Cost Estimating I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CMT 1100 or CMT 3150. Principles and practices involved in the preparation of a cost estimate for a residential home. Topics include introduction to cost estimating, materials, and labor costs for residential building.

  • CMT 4010 - Construction Law  3 credit hours  

    CMT 4010 - Construction Law

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing. Practical approach to the legal system in construction. Topics include licensing requirements, business associations, hiring professionals, employment issues, insurance, worker's comp, tort liability, contracts, financing, sale of property, title issues, liens, land use, bankruptcy, and warranties.

  • ET 3630 - Electronics  3 credit hours  

    ET 3630 - Electronics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. Introduction to analog electronics. Defines basic parameters and theory of operation of discrete semiconductor devices. Introduces fundamentals of electronic circuits analysis and design. Applications illustrate use and laboratory projects provide hands-on experience. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ENGR 3920 - Engineering Safety

    3 credit hours

    Safety and health in the manufacturing, construction, and utilities industries, including pertinent laws, codes, regulations, standards, and product liability considerations. Organizational and administrative principles and practices for safety management and safety engineering, accident investigation, safety education, and safety enforcement.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4420 - Industrial Safety.

  • ACTG 3000 - Survey of Accounting for General Business

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: A college-level math course; ENGL 1010; sophomore standing. Accounting cycle given minor emphasis; financial statement analysis and managerial uses of accounting given major emphasis. May be used for general business minors or M.B.A. candidates who have had no previous accounting courses. (Not open to Accounting majors and students with credit in ACTG 2110 and ACTG 2120.)

  • ET 3920 - Industrial Internship I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Student is employed by an acceptable industry for industrial experience. Credit given for actual work with employer. Arrangement for this course must be made in advance. Pass/Fail.

  • CMT 4130 - Construction Administration

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Senior standing, CMT 3160, CMT 3190, and CMT 3320. Management and administration of construction to include contracts, office, and field work.

  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours

 

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 30 Hours

Senior

 

  • CMT 4120 - Scheduling  3 credit hours  

    CMT 4120 - Scheduling

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CMT 3000 or CMT 3180. Flow of labor and material toward specified goal, weather, trade characteristics, and material availability in work scheduling shown by graphs.

  • CMT 4172 - Capstone for Electrical Construction Management

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Senior status; permission of department. Taken during the last semester of coursework at MTSU. Student will develop a project(s) that relates to the material covered in concentration courses. Proposed outline(s) required and must be approved by the Electrical Construction Management advisor before starting.

  • ET 3930 - Industrial Internship II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3920. A continuation of Internship I. Same stipulations apply. Pass/Fail.

  • ET 4600 - Programmable Logic Controllers

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. Introduction to programmable logic controllers (PLCs). Selection, operation, and troubleshooting. Ladder diagrams and programming of PLC emphasized. One hour lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4610 - Instrumentation and Controls

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 3620 and ET 3630. Devices and techniques used in the measurement of physical parameters. Consideration of accuracies and sources of error, identification of typical measurements, sensors and transducers, control stability and response. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4640 - Industrial Electricity

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. AC power theory and circuits for industrial applications, polyphase systems, power factor correction, and transformers. Theory, applications, and selection of motors and generators. Industrial motor control and power transmission. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • MATH 1530 - Applied Statistics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra and a Math Enhanced ACT 19 or greater or equivalent. Descriptive statistics, probability, and statistical inference. The inference unit covers means, proportions, and variances for one and two samples, and topics from one-way ANOVA, regression and correlation analysis, chi-square analysis, and nonparametrics.

  • Elective 1 credit hour

 

  • ENGR 3915 - Technical Project Management and Soft Skills

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Project management as sanctioned by the International Project Management Institute and how to assess and boost emotional intelligence or soft skills. Student successfully completing course will earn 20 Professional Development Units (PDUs) issued by the International Project Management Institute.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4915.

  • ENGR 3970 - Engineering Economy

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Development of capital budgets. Justification of capital projects using time value of money concepts. Replacement analysis. Review of justification of actual capital projects and computer applications. Introduces economic risk assessment and Lean Six Sigma from an economic viewpoint.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4970.

 

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 27 Hours

Total hours in program: 120

 

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Construction Management, Electrical Construction Management, B.S., Academic Map  


Construction Management, Land Development/Residential Building Construction Management, B.S.

Department of Engineering Technology 
615-898-2776
David Hatfield, program coordinator
David.Hatfiel@mtsu.edu

The Construction Management major is a broad-based program designed to prepare students for positions in the construction industry. Corporate and private construction companies seek graduates to fill job positions in the field and in management. Students may select from three concentrations: Land Development/Residential Building Construction Management, Electrical Construction Management, and Commercial Construction Management. The merging of a strong technical background with the ability to lead personnel and manage systems produces a graduate who is invaluable to the construction industry.

The Land Development/Residential Building Construction Management concentration offers preparation for a variety of construction-related positions. The concentration is accredited by the Association of Technology, Management, and Applied Engineering (ATMAE). As students progress, they are expected to develop creativity and the communication skills necessary to meet the challenges of industry. Students engage in a variety of activities to build a strong background in the field, including lectures by industry members, field trips, and hands-on activities in the classroom and in the field. The program is designed to prepare graduates for supervisory or staff positions in a variety of construction-related businesses (land development, construction firms, wholesalers of construction materials, construction material manufacturing, lumberyards, etc.) Employment opportunities for graduates include general supervision, project management, human relations, sales and marketing, production and inventory control, quality control, estimating, scheduling, and land development.

Curriculum: Construction Management, Land Development/Residential Building Construction Management

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

Students should consult their advisors each semester to plan their schedules.

Freshman

 

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • MATH 1710 - College Algebra  3 credit hours  (Math)

    MATH 1710 - College Algebra

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: DSPM 0850 or two years of high school algebra; a Math Enhanced ACT 19 or greater or COMPASS placement. Course satisfies the General Education Mathematics requirement. Topics include functions--linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic; analysis of graphs; linear systems; inequalities; counting principles; and probability. Graphing calculator required. Course may be taken by correspondence. Not open to those who have had MATH 1730.

  • MATH 1720 - Plane Trigonometry

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Strong background in algebra recommended. Trigonometric functions of the acute and general angle, circular functions, graphs of trigonometric and inverse functions, identities, solutions of right and general triangles, equations, complex numbers, and vectors. Not open to those who have had MATH 1730. Graphing calculator required.

  • CMT 1100 - Introduction to Construction Systems

    3 credit hours

    Introduces the major systems encountered when managing construction. Includes those operations of the residential and commercial construction industry, their similarities and how they differ in scope and daily practice. Basic entry-level plan reading skills, specifications, estimating and scheduling concepts incorporated as part of the business management functions pertaining to the construction industry. Seminar style to include student research, guest lecturers, and potential site visits. Required for graduation in Construction Management and should be taken prior to beginning CM upper-division coursework.

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours

 

  • PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I  0 credit hours  (Nat Sci) AND

    PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2011. Web-based discussion class to be taken in conjunction with cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2011. Classical mechanics traditionally covered in a first-semester college physics course. Kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Class time used for discussion of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci)

    PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2010. Group-oriented problems course taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2010. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2010 discussion class. Covers kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

OR

  • PHYS 1110 - Discovering Physics

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710, MATH 1730, or MATH 1630. Uncovers the fundamental concepts of physics in a hands-on approach that involves observations, measurements, forming hypotheses, and validation of ideas in groups of students' peers. Combined lecture/laboratory sessions.

 

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 31 Hours

 

Sophomore

 

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

 

  • GEOL 1040 - Physical Geology  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci) AND

    GEOL 1040 - Physical Geology

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: GEOL 1041. The origin, composition, and structure of the solid earth: rock-forming minerals; igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks; earthquakes and plate tectonics; surface processes; geologic time. Identification and description of minerals and rocks in hand sample. Use of topographic and geologic maps. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

 

  • SPAN 1010 - Elementary Spanish I

    3 credit hours

    A foundation course in reading, writing, speaking Spanish with an emphasis on conversation.

  • SPAN 1015 - Spanish for Concrete and Construction Management

    3 credit hours

    Introduces basic Spanish vocabulary and grammar with specific emphasis on facilitating communication, improving productivity, and promoting safety in the concrete and construction work environment. Cannot be used as prerequisite for SPAN 1020. Open only to majors and minors in Concrete Industry Management and Construction Management Technology.

 

  • CMT 3195 - Sustainable Construction

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CMT 3190 or permission of department. Introduces current green building technologies and LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) and NAHB (National Association of Home Builders) Green Building Guidelines and other green build programs. Also covers the impact of the building industry on the environment and how that impact can be minimized by the use of green technology.  

  • ET 2310 - Computer-Assisted Drafting and Design I

    3 credit hours

    Covers basic technical drawing/sketching and drafting concepts using personal computers, plotters, and appropriate CAD software. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.  

  • FIN 3030 - Principles of Real Estate

    3 credit hours

    Real estate practices and procedures, basic principles of real property ownership utilization and transfer, mortgage financing, brokerage, management, valuation, subdividing, and legislation.

  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 6 credit hours

Subtotal: 31 Hours

 

Junior

 

  • ACTG 3000 - Survey of Accounting for General Business

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: A college-level math course; ENGL 1010; sophomore standing. Accounting cycle given minor emphasis; financial statement analysis and managerial uses of accounting given major emphasis. May be used for general business minors or M.B.A. candidates who have had no previous accounting courses. (Not open to Accounting majors and students with credit in ACTG 2110 and ACTG 2120.)

  • CMT 3150 - Residential Building Construction and Materials I

    3 credit hours

    Introduces the residential construction industry. Includes basic fundamentals, terminology, materials, current methods, techniques, and associated problems. Recommended for those desiring general knowledge of residential construction or who plan to work in the construction industry. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • CMT 3160 - Cost Estimating I  3 credit hours  

    CMT 3160 - Cost Estimating I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CMT 1100 or CMT 3150. Principles and practices involved in the preparation of a cost estimate for a residential home. Topics include introduction to cost estimating, materials, and labor costs for residential building.

  • CMT 3180 - Construction and Materials II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CMT 3150. A continuation of CMT 3150 with emphasis on new building materials and various types of construction. Light commercial construction included.

  • CMT 3210 - Residential Codes, Regulations, Specifications, and Plan Reading

    3 credit hours

    The residential and subdivision infrastructure construction language for plan reading, codes, regulations, and specifications. Lectures and hands-on activities. Industry will provide guest lecturers and show examples of some of their work in the field. Students will be required to visit architects, city and county codes department representatives, and contractors during the semester.

  • CMT 3320 - Architectural Computer-Aided Drafting and Design

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing, ET 2310, or permission of department. Using computers to draw and design residential architectural plans. Specifically geared toward the construction area of concentration. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • CMT 4010 - Construction Law  3 credit hours  

    CMT 4010 - Construction Law

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing. Practical approach to the legal system in construction. Topics include licensing requirements, business associations, hiring professionals, employment issues, insurance, worker's comp, tort liability, contracts, financing, sale of property, title issues, liens, land use, bankruptcy, and warranties.

  • ENGR 3920 - Engineering Safety

    3 credit hours

    Safety and health in the manufacturing, construction, and utilities industries, including pertinent laws, codes, regulations, standards, and product liability considerations. Organizational and administrative principles and practices for safety management and safety engineering, accident investigation, safety education, and safety enforcement.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4420 - Industrial Safety.

  • MKT 3820 - Principles of Marketing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing. Survey of the functions, processes, and institutions involved in the distribution of consumer and industrial goods and services. Decision making in marketing management introduced.

 

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Senior

 

  • CMT 3500 - Land Surveying  3 credit hours  

    CMT 3500 - Land Surveying

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1720 or MATH 1730 or MATH 1910. Basic surveying operations such as chaining, differential leveling, transverse methods and calculations, structural layout, topographic mapping, and slope staking for road and utilities in subdivisions. Basic surveying instruments used include the chain, automatic level, transit, and theodolite. Environmental issues relating to land and land development covered. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • CMT 4100 - Mechanical and Electrical Systems

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CMT 3320. Fundamentals and computer design of mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems used in the residential and light commercial building construction industry. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • CMT 4110 - Cost Estimating II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CMT 4100, CMT 4120, and CMT 4130. Use of computer to estimate total cost of land development and housing costs for capstone project.

  • CMT 4120 - Scheduling  3 credit hours  

    CMT 4120 - Scheduling

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CMT 3000 or CMT 3180. Flow of labor and material toward specified goal, weather, trade characteristics, and material availability in work scheduling shown by graphs.

  • CMT 4130 - Construction Administration

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Senior standing, CMT 3160, CMT 3190, and CMT 3320. Management and administration of construction to include contracts, office, and field work.

  • CMT 4170 - Capstone-LDRB Construction Management

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CMT 4100, CMT 4120, and CMT 4130. Final preparation of development plans, etc., for subdivision. Basic principles of presentations. Presentation of capstone project to Building Construction Technical Committee.

  • ENGR 3915 - Technical Project Management and Soft Skills

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Project management as sanctioned by the International Project Management Institute and how to assess and boost emotional intelligence or soft skills. Student successfully completing course will earn 20 Professional Development Units (PDUs) issued by the International Project Management Institute.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4915.

  • ENGR 3970 - Engineering Economy

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Development of capital budgets. Justification of capital projects using time value of money concepts. Replacement analysis. Review of justification of actual capital projects and computer applications. Introduces economic risk assessment and Lean Six Sigma from an economic viewpoint.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4970.

  • Elective 4 credit hours

Subtotal: 28 Hours

 

Total hours in program: 120

 

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Construction Management, Land Development/Residential Building Construction Management, B.S., Academic Map  


Construction Management, Commercial Construction Management Concentration, B.S.

Department of Engineering Technology 
615-898-2776
Al Carter, program coordinator
Al.Carter@mtsu.edu

 

The Construction Management major is a broad-based program designed to prepare students for positions in the construction industry. Corporate and private construction companies seek graduates to fill job positions in the field and in management. Students may select from three concentrations: Land Development/Residential Building Construction Management, Electrical Construction Management, and Commercial Construction Management. The merging of a strong technical background with the ability to lead personnel and manage systems produces a graduate who is invaluable to the construction industry.

The Commercial Construction Management concentration is designed to prepare students to assume positions of responsibility within the commercial construction industry worldwide. Students who graduate are able to secure positions as project estimators, codes inspectors, assistant project engineers, assistant superintendents or superintendents, assistant or project managers, and/or ultimately owners of construction-related companies. Students will get many hands-on opportunities for learning with the project-based program and will also be able to obtain practical experience in the industry through the internship/cooperative education requirements with companies that construct a variety of commercial structures.

Curriculum: Construction Management, Commercial Construction Management

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

Freshman

 

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 6 credit hours
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences (ECON 2410 recommended) 6 credit hours
  • MATH 1730 - Pre-Calculus  4 credit hours  (Math)

    MATH 1730 - Pre-Calculus

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 or successful completion of high school precalculus course. An integrated and rigorous study of the algebra and trigonometry needed to successfully attempt calculus. Emphasis on functions, their analysis and their applications. Level of algebraic sophistication developed above that found in MATH 1710. Topics include exponentials and logarithms, analysis of graphs, and word problems. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • CMT 1100 - Introduction to Construction Systems

    3 credit hours

    Introduces the major systems encountered when managing construction. Includes those operations of the residential and commercial construction industry, their similarities and how they differ in scope and daily practice. Basic entry-level plan reading skills, specifications, estimating and scheduling concepts incorporated as part of the business management functions pertaining to the construction industry. Seminar style to include student research, guest lecturers, and potential site visits. Required for graduation in Construction Management and should be taken prior to beginning CM upper-division coursework.

  • ET 2310 - Computer-Assisted Drafting and Design I

    3 credit hours

    Covers basic technical drawing/sketching and drafting concepts using personal computers, plotters, and appropriate CAD software. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.  

Subtotal: 32 Hours

Sophomore

 

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

 

  • PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I  0 credit hours  (Nat Sci)

    PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2011. Web-based discussion class to be taken in conjunction with cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2011. Classical mechanics traditionally covered in a first-semester college physics course. Kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Class time used for discussion of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci)

    PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2010. Group-oriented problems course taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2010. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2010 discussion class. Covers kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

OR

  • PHYS 1110 - Discovering Physics  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci)

    PHYS 1110 - Discovering Physics

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710, MATH 1730, or MATH 1630. Uncovers the fundamental concepts of physics in a hands-on approach that involves observations, measurements, forming hypotheses, and validation of ideas in groups of students' peers. Combined lecture/laboratory sessions.

  • CHEM 1010 - Introductory General Chemistry I  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci) AND

    CHEM 1010 - Introductory General Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: CHEM 1011. For students with no prior courses in chemistry; to be taken before CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Fundamental concepts of chemistry: measurements, matter, chemical bonds, chemical reactions, nuclear chemistry, states of matter, solutions, and electrolytes. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory. Will not count toward a major or minor in Chemistry.

OR

  • CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci) AND

    CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: High school chemistry. Corequisite: CHEM 1111. Fundamental concepts of atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometric relationships, periodic properties of the elements, thermochemistry, and properties of gases. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • ENGR 2110 - Statics  3 credit hours  

    ENGR 2110 - Statics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGR 1100 and MATH 1910. Corequisite: PHYS 2011 or PHYS 2111. Mechatronics Engineering majors must complete PHYS 2111. Fundamental concepts and conditions of static equilibrium; their application to systems of forces and couples acting on rigid bodies; and the calculation of centers of gravity, centroids, and moments of inertia.

  • ENGR 3920 - Engineering Safety

    3 credit hours

    Safety and health in the manufacturing, construction, and utilities industries, including pertinent laws, codes, regulations, standards, and product liability considerations. Organizational and administrative principles and practices for safety management and safety engineering, accident investigation, safety education, and safety enforcement.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4420 - Industrial Safety.

  • CMT 3000 - Commercial Construction and Materials

    3 credit hours

    Blueprint reading, commercial construction materials and equipment, commercial construction systems, new materials and procedures, and fundamentals essential to knowledge of the commercial construction field. Lecture, field observations, and site/or plant visits required.

  • ET 2920 - Industrial Orientation Internship  1 to 3 credit hours  (1 credit hour)

    ET 2920 - Industrial Orientation Internship

    1 to 3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Provides industrial exposure for students with little or no industrial work experience. Students will be placed in an acceptable company for introductory industrial experiences. Arrangement for this course must be made in advance. Students may take from one to three credit hours; may be repeated for up to a maximum of three credit hours. Pass/Fail.

 

  • CMT 3195 - Sustainable Construction

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CMT 3190 or permission of department. Introduces current green building technologies and LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) and NAHB (National Association of Home Builders) Green Building Guidelines and other green build programs. Also covers the impact of the building industry on the environment and how that impact can be minimized by the use of green technology.  

  • CIM 3050 - Concrete Construction Methods

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CIM 3000 or CMT 1100. Forming and shoring, placing and reinforcing; transporting, placing, consolidating, finishing, jointing, and curing concrete for cast-in-place foundations, pavements, slabs on ground, structural frames, and other structural members; erecting precast concrete members; waterproofing concrete foundations.

 

Choose 6 hours from:

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Junior

 

  • CMT 3160 - Cost Estimating I  3 credit hours  

    CMT 3160 - Cost Estimating I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CMT 1100 or CMT 3150. Principles and practices involved in the preparation of a cost estimate for a residential home. Topics include introduction to cost estimating, materials, and labor costs for residential building.

  • CMT 3320 - Architectural Computer-Aided Drafting and Design

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing, ET 2310, or permission of department. Using computers to draw and design residential architectural plans. Specifically geared toward the construction area of concentration. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • CMT 3500 - Land Surveying  3 credit hours  

    CMT 3500 - Land Surveying

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1720 or MATH 1730 or MATH 1910. Basic surveying operations such as chaining, differential leveling, transverse methods and calculations, structural layout, topographic mapping, and slope staking for road and utilities in subdivisions. Basic surveying instruments used include the chain, automatic level, transit, and theodolite. Environmental issues relating to land and land development covered. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • CMT 4100 - Mechanical and Electrical Systems

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CMT 3320. Fundamentals and computer design of mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems used in the residential and light commercial building construction industry. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • CMT 4120 - Scheduling  3 credit hours  

    CMT 4120 - Scheduling

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CMT 3000 or CMT 3180. Flow of labor and material toward specified goal, weather, trade characteristics, and material availability in work scheduling shown by graphs.

  • ET 3860 - Strength of Materials

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGR 2110. The mechanics of materials emphasizing the analysis and design of statically determinate beams, columns, and structural members in torsion and application of the three moment equations to statically indeterminate beams.

  • ENGR 3970 - Engineering Economy

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Development of capital budgets. Justification of capital projects using time value of money concepts. Replacement analysis. Review of justification of actual capital projects and computer applications. Introduces economic risk assessment and Lean Six Sigma from an economic viewpoint.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4970.

  • MKT 3820 - Principles of Marketing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing. Survey of the functions, processes, and institutions involved in the distribution of consumer and industrial goods and services. Decision making in marketing management introduced.

  • BLAW 3400 - Legal Environment of Business

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing. Legal rights and potential liabilities of business persons. Presentation of the dynamic nature of law in responding to the changing social, ethical, political, regulatory, and international environment. Includes the development and nature of the legal system; business crimes; the law of torts and product liability; constitutional limitations on regulatory powers; legislative, judicial, and administrative control of business activity through the laws of business organizations, securities regulations, antitrust laws, employment laws, labor and safety laws, and consumer protection.

  • ET 2920 - Industrial Orientation Internship  1 to 3 credit hours  (1 credit hour)

    ET 2920 - Industrial Orientation Internship

    1 to 3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Provides industrial exposure for students with little or no industrial work experience. Students will be placed in an acceptable company for introductory industrial experiences. Arrangement for this course must be made in advance. Students may take from one to three credit hours; may be repeated for up to a maximum of three credit hours. Pass/Fail.

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

Subtotal: 31 Hours

 

Senior

 

  • ACTG 3000 - Survey of Accounting for General Business

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: A college-level math course; ENGL 1010; sophomore standing. Accounting cycle given minor emphasis; financial statement analysis and managerial uses of accounting given major emphasis. May be used for general business minors or M.B.A. candidates who have had no previous accounting courses. (Not open to Accounting majors and students with credit in ACTG 2110 and ACTG 2120.)

  • CMT 4000 - Soils, Foundations and Earth Moving Equipment

    3 credit hours

    Properties and testing of soils on a job site, different kinds of foundations used, and an overview of the different kinds and costs of earth moving equipment used in the commercial construction industry.

  • CMT 4010 - Construction Law  3 credit hours  

    CMT 4010 - Construction Law

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing. Practical approach to the legal system in construction. Topics include licensing requirements, business associations, hiring professionals, employment issues, insurance, worker's comp, tort liability, contracts, financing, sale of property, title issues, liens, land use, bankruptcy, and warranties.

  • CMT 4140 - Construction Management Principles

    3 credit hours

    Detailed look at how the construction industry works. Includes review of model building codes, building officials and their functions, construction industry codes and standards, quality assurance systems, contract documents, and principles of managing construction contracts.

  • CMT 4200 - Commercial Cost Estimating and Bidding

    3 credit hours

    Commercial estimating including take-offs from blueprints, using preferred computer estimating programs, educational trips to Dodge Room in Nashville, actually seeing a job being estimated and bid.

  • CMT 4280 - Commercial Construction Capstone

    3 credit hours

    Construction portfolio presented to subcommittee of advisory committee. Pictures and/or projects developed in junior- and senior-level commercial construction classes included; all facets of a commercial construction project from inception to completion. Pass/Fail.

  • ENGR 3915 - Technical Project Management and Soft Skills

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Project management as sanctioned by the International Project Management Institute and how to assess and boost emotional intelligence or soft skills. Student successfully completing course will earn 20 Professional Development Units (PDUs) issued by the International Project Management Institute.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4915.

  • FIN 3000 - Principles of Financial Management

    3 credit hours

    Will not substitute for FIN 3010. An overview of the fundamental concepts and tools for financial decision making within a business firm. (Not open to business majors.)

  • Elective 3 credit hours

Subtotal: 27 Hours

Total hours in program: 120

 

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Construction Management, Commercial Construction Management, B.S., Academic Map  


Pre-Architecture

Department of Engineering Technology 
615-898-2776
Al Carter, program coordinator
Al.Carter@mtsu.edu

The Pre-Architecture program is recommended as the first year of a five-year program leading to the Bachelor of Architecture degree. After successful completion of the courses listed, students are eligible to apply for admission to the school of architecture of their choice. It should be understood that students who complete this year of work will not automatically be assured of admission to the remaining four years of work in a school of architecture. Those who wish to apply to a school of architecture should see their advisors no later than February 1 in order to have time to follow the proper procedure to be considered for admission for the fall term of the following year. The recommended program for the first year follows.

Freshman

 

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • ENGR 1100 - Engineering Fundamentals

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1630 or MATH 1730. Introduces various engineering fields. Emphasis on problem-solving techniques and the use of mathematics in analyzing technical problems. Topics such as graphical representation of data, estimation, dimensions, units, error estimates, statistics, and team work addressed. Engineering ethics and impact of engineering solutions on society and the environment.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 1840.

  • Social Science Electives 6 credit hours
  • Science 8 credit hours

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

NOTE:

*To be selected based on the transfer school requirements and the approval of the advisor. The student should have the catalog of the transfer school at the time of registration, if possible.

Students should consult their advisors each semester to plan their schedules.

Dr. Walter Boles
Department Chair
walter.boles@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Carol Boraiko
Associate Professor
carol.boraiko@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Alphonse Carter, Jr.
Professor
al.carter@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Chong Chen
Professor
chong.chen@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Saeed Foroudastan
Associate Dean | MSPS Program Director
saeed.foroudastan@mtsu.edu

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David Gore
Associate Professor
david.gore@mtsu.edu

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Thomas Gormley
Associate Professor
thomas.gormley@mtsu.edu

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Dr. David Hatfield
Director, Professor
david.hatfield@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Kathy Mathis
Associate Professor
kathy.mathis@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Ahad Nasab
Professor | Program Coordinator
ahad.nasab@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Charles Perry
Professor
charles.perry@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Karim Salman
Associate Professor
karim.salman@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Saleh Sbenaty
Professor
saleh.sbenaty@mtsu.edu

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Dr. B. S. Sridhara
Professor
sid.sridhara@mtsu.edu

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Rick Taylor
Director
rick.taylor@mtsu.edu

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Eddie D. Vanhook
Assistant Professor
duane.vanhook@mtsu.edu

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Construction Management Technology

CMT 1100 - Introduction to Construction Systems
3 credit hours

Introduces the major systems encountered when managing construction. Includes those operations of the residential and commercial construction industry, their similarities and how they differ in scope and daily practice. Basic entry-level plan reading skills, specifications, estimating and scheduling concepts incorporated as part of the business management functions pertaining to the construction industry. Seminar style to include student research, guest lecturers, and potential site visits. Required for graduation in Construction Management and should be taken prior to beginning CM upper-division coursework.

CMT 3000 - Commercial Construction and Materials
3 credit hours

Blueprint reading, commercial construction materials and equipment, commercial construction systems, new materials and procedures, and fundamentals essential to knowledge of the commercial construction field. Lecture, field observations, and site/or plant visits required.

CMT 3150 - Residential Building Construction and Materials I
3 credit hours

Introduces the residential construction industry. Includes basic fundamentals, terminology, materials, current methods, techniques, and associated problems. Recommended for those desiring general knowledge of residential construction or who plan to work in the construction industry. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

CMT 3155 - Land Development and Residential Building
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Junior status or permission of department. Online course for land development and infrastructure layout. House plans, methods, and techniques used in building conventional structure. Recommended for those desiring general knowledge as a consumer of residential construction. (Required for Electrical Construction Management concentration. Land Development/Residential Building Construction Management major or minor students cannot use this course to replace CMT 3150.)

CMT 3160 - Cost Estimating I
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: CMT 1100 or CMT 3150. Principles and practices involved in the preparation of a cost estimate for a residential home. Topics include introduction to cost estimating, materials, and labor costs for residential building.

CMT 3180 - Construction and Materials II
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: CMT 3150. A continuation of CMT 3150 with emphasis on new building materials and various types of construction. Light commercial construction included.

CMT 3190 - Construction Land Development Operations
3 credit hours

Topics include contractor procedures in land development, land development infrastructure, and management methods.

CMT 3195 - Sustainable Construction
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: CMT 3190 or permission of department. Introduces current green building technologies and LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) and NAHB (National Association of Home Builders) Green Building Guidelines and other green build programs. Also covers the impact of the building industry on the environment and how that impact can be minimized by the use of green technology.  

CMT 3210 - Residential Codes, Regulations, Specifications, and Pla
3 credit hours

The residential and subdivision infrastructure construction language for plan reading, codes, regulations, and specifications. Lectures and hands-on activities. Industry will provide guest lecturers and show examples of some of their work in the field. Students will be required to visit architects, city and county codes department representatives, and contractors during the semester.

CMT 3320 - Architectural Computer-Aided Drafting and Design
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing, ET 2310, or permission of department. Using computers to draw and design residential architectural plans. Specifically geared toward the construction area of concentration. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

CMT 3500 - Land Surveying
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 1720 or MATH 1730 or MATH 1910. Basic surveying operations such as chaining, differential leveling, transverse methods and calculations, structural layout, topographic mapping, and slope staking for road and utilities in subdivisions. Basic surveying instruments used include the chain, automatic level, transit, and theodolite. Environmental issues relating to land and land development covered. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

CMT 4000 - Soils, Foundations and Earth Moving Equipment
3 credit hours

Properties and testing of soils on a job site, different kinds of foundations used, and an overview of the different kinds and costs of earth moving equipment used in the commercial construction industry.

CMT 4010 - Construction Law
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Junior standing. Practical approach to the legal system in construction. Topics include licensing requirements, business associations, hiring professionals, employment issues, insurance, worker's comp, tort liability, contracts, financing, sale of property, title issues, liens, land use, bankruptcy, and warranties.

CMT 4100 - Mechanical and Electrical Systems
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: CMT 3320. Fundamentals and computer design of mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems used in the residential and light commercial building construction industry. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

CMT 4110 - Cost Estimating II
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: CMT 4100, CMT 4120, and CMT 4130. Use of computer to estimate total cost of land development and housing costs for capstone project.

CMT 4120 - Scheduling
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: CMT 3000 or CMT 3180. Flow of labor and material toward specified goal, weather, trade characteristics, and material availability in work scheduling shown by graphs.

CMT 4130 - Construction Administration
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: Senior standing, CMT 3160, CMT 3190, and CMT 3320. Management and administration of construction to include contracts, office, and field work.

CMT 4140 - Construction Management Principles
3 credit hours

Detailed look at how the construction industry works. Includes review of model building codes, building officials and their functions, construction industry codes and standards, quality assurance systems, contract documents, and principles of managing construction contracts.

CMT 4170 - Capstone-LDRB Construction Management
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: CMT 4100, CMT 4120, and CMT 4130. Final preparation of development plans, etc., for subdivision. Basic principles of presentations. Presentation of capstone project to Building Construction Technical Committee.

CMT 4172 - Capstone for Electrical Construction Management
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Senior status; permission of department. Taken during the last semester of coursework at MTSU. Student will develop a project(s) that relates to the material covered in concentration courses. Proposed outline(s) required and must be approved by the Electrical Construction Management advisor before starting.

CMT 4200 - Commercial Cost Estimating and Bidding
3 credit hours

Commercial estimating including take-offs from blueprints, using preferred computer estimating programs, educational trips to Dodge Room in Nashville, actually seeing a job being estimated and bid.

CMT 4280 - Commercial Construction Capstone
3 credit hours

Construction portfolio presented to subcommittee of advisory committee. Pictures and/or projects developed in junior- and senior-level commercial construction classes included; all facets of a commercial construction project from inception to completion. Pass/Fail.

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