• At NASA's annual race, MTSU's lunar rover team is consistently the state's number one
  • Opportunities to learn by doing are open to all University students
  • MTSU students develop,
    design, and mold entries for the yearly
    Solar Splash competition
  • Alumnus Darrell Freeman started a successful business that now employs more than 300 people

Engineering Technology

When it comes to engineering technology, classroom discussion can only go so far in exposing students to the challenges posed by the real world. MTSU's Engineering Technology program excels at placing students in contact with industry professionals in a stimulating and encouraging environment in which to acquire and test the skills and knowledge they will need after college.

Come along for the ride!

Come along for the ride!

Established in 2004, the Experimental Vehicles Program (EVP) currently comprises four different undergraduate research projects. From moonbuggies and solar boats to SAE Formula One and SAE Mini Baja racing, teams take part in national and even global competitions while gaining valuable experience on how to work in a collaborative environment. Although these projects are geared towards students in the Engineering Technology Department, any MTSU student with enthusiasm and a willingness to learn is welcome to join in on the competitions.

Building a career

Building a career

The Robert E. and Georgianna West Russell Chair of Manufacturing Excellence is designed to promote quality interaction with local industry. Students are encouraged to benefit from the scheduled activities, seminars, and short courses sponsored by the Chair of Manufacturing Excellence. The chair is just one of the many ways by which the Engineering Technology department provides students with a career-oriented, hands-on education through nationally accredited programs.

While many engineering schools focus on the theoretical, MTSU's Engineering Technology program excels in providing hands-on experiences and skills that are immediately transferrable to the workforce. Examples include

  • Applications engineer
  • Energy applications manager
  • Energy operations engineer
  • Energy systems quality engineer
  • Engineering technologist
  • Field engineer
  • Lighting shop technician
  • Management trainee
  • Power plant manager
  • Professor
  • Project manager
  • Sales representative
  • Senior technical associate
  • Software engineer

Employers of MTSU alumni include

  • Automation nth
  • Bridgestone
  • Calsonic Kansei
  • Carrier
  • EM-Tech
  • FloStor Engineering, Inc.
  • General Mills
  • General Motors
  • Mahle
  • Nissan
  • Schneider Electric
  • Southeastern Technologies
  • SW Manufacturing
  • TVA
  • USA ZAMA
  • Vought Industries

A student majoring in Engineering Technology can pursue a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in one of three concentrations: Computer Engineering Technology, Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology, or Mechanical Engineering Technology. Interested students may take courses in Pre-engineering and Pre-architecture.

For complete curriculum details, click on the REQUIREMENTS tab above.

Undergraduate minors available include Electronics, Engineering Systems, and Engineering Technology.

Graduate students can pursue a Master of Science (M.S.) degree in either Engineering Technology or Occupational Health and Safety.

Computer Engineering Technology Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology Mechanical Engineering Technology


Engineering Technology, Computer Engineering Technology Concentration, B.S.

Department of Engineering Technology 
615-898-2776
Saleh Sbenaty, program coordinator
Saleh.Sbenaty@mtsu.edu

Engineering Technology is a technologically advanced program at the Bachelor of Science level utilizing theoretical concepts and hands-on instruction. Program selection is from the following concentrations: Computer Engineering Technology, Electromechanical Engineering Technology, and Mechanical Engineering Technology.

The Computer Engineering Technology concentration requires 53 hours and is accredited by ABET, Inc. (http://www.abet.org) and provides the student with a sound technical base in electric and electronic circuits, digital systems, and computer hardware and software. Microcontroller, microprocessor, FPGA, and microcomputer applications in the area of control and automation as well as programming, data acquisition, transfer, and analysis are also emphasized.

Employment opportunities exist in various industrial fields that require the design and applications of digital computers such as manufacturing, medical, aerospace, control, instrumentation and measurements, and networking, installations, and maintenance of computers.

NOTE: A grade of C or better is required on transfer credits accepted as part of a major in Engineering Technology.

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Engineering Technology, Computer Engineering Technology, B.S., Academic Map  

Degree Requirements

General Education (41 hours)

General Education requirements (shown in curricular listings below) include courses in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences.

The following General Education courses are required for this major:

  • MATH 1730 (Math)
  • CHEM 1110/1111 (Nat Sci)
  • PHYS 2010/2011 (Nat Sci)

Major Requirements (53 hours)

Engineering Technology Core (22 hours)

  • ENGR 1100 - Engineering Fundamentals

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1630 or MATH 1730. Introduces various engineering fields. Emphasis on problem-solving techniques and the use of mathematics in analyzing technical problems. Topics such as graphical representation of data, estimation, dimensions, units, error estimates, statistics, and team work addressed. Engineering ethics and impact of engineering solutions on society and the environment.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 1840.

  • ENGR 3915 - Technical Project Management and Soft Skills

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Project management as sanctioned by the International Project Management Institute and how to assess and boost emotional intelligence or soft skills. Student successfully completing course will earn 20 Professional Development Units (PDUs) issued by the International Project Management Institute.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4915.

  • ENGR 3920 - Engineering Safety

    3 credit hours

    Safety and health in the manufacturing, construction, and utilities industries, including pertinent laws, codes, regulations, standards, and product liability considerations. Organizational and administrative principles and practices for safety management and safety engineering, accident investigation, safety education, and safety enforcement.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4420 - Industrial Safety.

  • ENGR 3970 - Engineering Economy

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Development of capital budgets. Justification of capital projects using time value of money concepts. Replacement analysis. Review of justification of actual capital projects and computer applications. Introduces economic risk assessment and Lean Six Sigma from an economic viewpoint.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4970.

  • ET 3601 - Electrical Circuit Analysis I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGR 1100. Corequisite: MATH 1910. Fundamentals of electrical circuits. Addresses basic circuit components and quantities. Emphasis on DC circuit calculations and theorems. Uses lab equipment to build and test DC circuits. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3602 - Electrical Circuit Analysis II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3601 and MATH 1910. Addresses basic circuit components and quantities of AC circuits. Introduces three-phase circuits and transformers. Emphasis on AC circuit calculations and theorems. Uses lab equipment to build and test AC circuits. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4710 - Professional Development Seminar  1 credit hour credit hours  

    ET 4710 - Professional Development Seminar

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior status. Orientation to industrial job opportunities, placement practices, interview techniques, and preparation of application materials (resume, cover letter, and portfolio if warranted). Guest lecturers, films, and student and faculty presentations arranged in seminar fashion. One-hour lecture weekly.

Computer Engineering Technology Capstone

 

  • ET 4801 - Computer Engineering Technology  1 to 3 credit hours  (3 credit hours required)

    ET 4801 - Computer Engineering Technology

    1 to 3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 4670; CSCI 3160. All required freshman-, sophomore-, and junior-level courses in all disciplines have to be completed before registering for this course. Engineering situations are solved by experimental means. Student must have experimental approach, gather data, interpret results, and prepare a formal technical written and oral report.

Computer Engineering Technology Concentration (31 hours)

  • ET 3620 - Digital Circuits Fundamentals

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3601 or permission of instructor. Provides thorough coverage of basic digital electronic circuits analysis and design. TTL and CMOS families examined. Number systems, mapping, and minimization techniques covered. Digital design using random logic and programmable logic devices (FPGAs and CPLDs). Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3630 - Electronics  3 credit hours  

    ET 3630 - Electronics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. Introduction to analog electronics. Defines basic parameters and theory of operation of discrete semiconductor devices. Introduces fundamentals of electronic circuits analysis and design. Applications illustrate use and laboratory projects provide hands-on experience. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3640 - Digital Circuits Design

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3620; corequisite: ET 3630 or permission of instructor. In-depth study of sequential circuit analysis and design that includes sate machine design. Emphasis on the use of available development boards using both FPGAs and CPLDs and their respective CAD tools. PLDs programmed using latest relative CAD systems. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3650 - Introduction to Microprocessors

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CSCI 1170 and ET 3620. Covers architecture of microcontrollers and microprocessor-based systems and their related components. Machine language programming extensively used to solve problems and demonstrate the relationship of the microprocessor and its supporting peripherals. Basic microcomputer architecture also emphasized. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3670 - Computer-Assisted Printed Circuit Board Design

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 3620 and ET 3630 or permission of instructor. Utilizes computer software to develop skills in creating schematic and printed circuit board artwork for use in printed circuit board production. Includes plotting, printing, and generating all necessary documents required for fabrication. One hour lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4600 - Programmable Logic Controllers

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. Introduction to programmable logic controllers (PLCs). Selection, operation, and troubleshooting. Ladder diagrams and programming of PLC emphasized. One hour lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4610 - Instrumentation and Controls

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 3620 and ET 3630. Devices and techniques used in the measurement of physical parameters. Consideration of accuracies and sources of error, identification of typical measurements, sensors and transducers, control stability and response. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4630 - Local Area Networks

    3 credit hours

    Provides the necessary foundation experience to understand the design, implementation, and management strategies of local and wide area networks (LAN/WAN). Data Communication Standards and protocol, fundamentals included. Will include lecture, laboratory activities, and a LAN design requirement. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4640 - Industrial Electricity

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. AC power theory and circuits for industrial applications, polyphase systems, power factor correction, and transformers. Theory, applications, and selection of motors and generators. Industrial motor control and power transmission. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4660 - Microprocessor Interfacing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 3640 and ET 3650 or permission of instructor. Emphasis on interfacing various analog and digital devices to a microcontroller/microprocessor-based system: memory expansion, A/D and D/A, display devices, keyboards and keypads, electromechanical devices, and sensors. PLDs (FPGAs/CPLDs) interfaced to facilitate rapid prototyping of digital system design. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4670 - Microprocessor Design

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 3640 and ET 4660 or permission of instructor. Advanced microprocessor system design. Emphasis on the design of core CPUs and imbedded components using high-density FPGA/CPLD development boards. Industrial applications of microprocessor-based systems. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

Supporting Courses (30 hours)

  • CSCI 1170 - Computer Science I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. The first of a two-semester sequence using a high-level language; language constructs and simple data structures such as arrays and strings. Emphasis on problem solving using the language and principles of structured software development. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hour.

  • CSCI 2170 - Computer Science II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CSCI 1170 or equivalent. A continuation of CSCI 1170. Topics include introductory object-oriented programming techniques, software engineering principles, records, recursion, pointers, stacks and queues, linked lists, trees, and sorting and searching. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours.

  • CSCI 3160 - Introduction to Assembly Language

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CSCI 1170 or equivalent. Computer architecture and assembly language. Major emphasis on addressing techniques, macros, and program segmentation and linkage.

  • CSCI 3180 - Introduction to Numerical Analysis

    3 credit hours

    (Same as MATH 3180.) Prerequisites: MATH 1920 and either CSCI 1160 or CSCI 1170. Topics include series approximation, finite differences interpolation, summation, numerical differentiation and integration, iteration, curve fitting, systems of equations and matrices, and error analysis.

  • ENGL 3620 - Professional Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Completion of English and literature General Education requirements; ENGL 1020 or ENGL 3605 with a B or better. A specialized composition course for students planning to enter the professional workplace, including industry, science, and government. Collaborative practice in the discourse and conventions of professional and technical writing: employment packages, memoranda, instructions, proposals, and reports.

  • MATH 1730 - Pre-Calculus  4 credit hours  (3 credit hours counted in General Education, 1 credit hour remaining)

    MATH 1730 - Pre-Calculus

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 or successful completion of high school precalculus course. An integrated and rigorous study of the algebra and trigonometry needed to successfully attempt calculus. Emphasis on functions, their analysis and their applications. Level of algebraic sophistication developed above that found in MATH 1710. Topics include exponentials and logarithms, analysis of graphs, and word problems. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1920 - Calculus II  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1920 - Calculus II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910 with C (2.00) or better. A topics course providing a wide view of different techniques and applications of calculus in the plane. Techniques of integration and applications of integration fully developed. Power series and Taylor series included. Emphasis on multidisciplinary applications includes Taylor series approximation; applications of integration to physics, biology, and business; and geometric and power series applications. Graphing calculator required.

 

  • PHYS 2020 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics II

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2021. Web-based discussion class taken in conjunction with the cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2021. Fundamentals of optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. Scheduled class time is used for discussions of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2021 - Physics Problems Laboratory II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2020. Group-oriented problems course to be taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2020. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2020 discussion class. Optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. The skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

Optional Computer Science Minor

The minor will include CSCI 1170, CSCI 2170, CSCI 3160, CSCI 3180 (14 hours) and at least 3 additional hours in upper-division computer science courses as approved by the minor and major advisors.

Total hours in program: 124

 

Curriculum: Engineering Technology, Computer Engineering Technology

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

Students should consult their advisors each semester to plan their schedules.

Freshman

 

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • MATH 1730 - Pre-Calculus  4 credit hours  (Math)

    MATH 1730 - Pre-Calculus

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 or successful completion of high school precalculus course. An integrated and rigorous study of the algebra and trigonometry needed to successfully attempt calculus. Emphasis on functions, their analysis and their applications. Level of algebraic sophistication developed above that found in MATH 1710. Topics include exponentials and logarithms, analysis of graphs, and word problems. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • ENGR 1100 - Engineering Fundamentals

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1630 or MATH 1730. Introduces various engineering fields. Emphasis on problem-solving techniques and the use of mathematics in analyzing technical problems. Topics such as graphical representation of data, estimation, dimensions, units, error estimates, statistics, and team work addressed. Engineering ethics and impact of engineering solutions on society and the environment.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 1840.

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours

 

  • CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci)

    CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: High school chemistry. Corequisite: CHEM 1111. Fundamental concepts of atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometric relationships, periodic properties of the elements, thermochemistry, and properties of gases. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Sophomore

 

  • MATH 1920 - Calculus II  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1920 - Calculus II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910 with C (2.00) or better. A topics course providing a wide view of different techniques and applications of calculus in the plane. Techniques of integration and applications of integration fully developed. Power series and Taylor series included. Emphasis on multidisciplinary applications includes Taylor series approximation; applications of integration to physics, biology, and business; and geometric and power series applications. Graphing calculator required.

 

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

 

  • ENGL 3620 - Professional Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Completion of English and literature General Education requirements; ENGL 1020 or ENGL 3605 with a B or better. A specialized composition course for students planning to enter the professional workplace, including industry, science, and government. Collaborative practice in the discourse and conventions of professional and technical writing: employment packages, memoranda, instructions, proposals, and reports.

  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours
  • ET 3601 - Electrical Circuit Analysis I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGR 1100. Corequisite: MATH 1910. Fundamentals of electrical circuits. Addresses basic circuit components and quantities. Emphasis on DC circuit calculations and theorems. Uses lab equipment to build and test DC circuits. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3602 - Electrical Circuit Analysis II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3601 and MATH 1910. Addresses basic circuit components and quantities of AC circuits. Introduces three-phase circuits and transformers. Emphasis on AC circuit calculations and theorems. Uses lab equipment to build and test AC circuits. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3620 - Digital Circuits Fundamentals

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3601 or permission of instructor. Provides thorough coverage of basic digital electronic circuits analysis and design. TTL and CMOS families examined. Number systems, mapping, and minimization techniques covered. Digital design using random logic and programmable logic devices (FPGAs and CPLDs). Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • CSCI 1170 - Computer Science I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. The first of a two-semester sequence using a high-level language; language constructs and simple data structures such as arrays and strings. Emphasis on problem solving using the language and principles of structured software development. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hour.

  • CSCI 2170 - Computer Science II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CSCI 1170 or equivalent. A continuation of CSCI 1170. Topics include introductory object-oriented programming techniques, software engineering principles, records, recursion, pointers, stacks and queues, linked lists, trees, and sorting and searching. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours.

Subtotal: 33 Hours

 

Junior

 

  • ET 3630 - Electronics  3 credit hours  

    ET 3630 - Electronics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. Introduction to analog electronics. Defines basic parameters and theory of operation of discrete semiconductor devices. Introduces fundamentals of electronic circuits analysis and design. Applications illustrate use and laboratory projects provide hands-on experience. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3640 - Digital Circuits Design

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3620; corequisite: ET 3630 or permission of instructor. In-depth study of sequential circuit analysis and design that includes sate machine design. Emphasis on the use of available development boards using both FPGAs and CPLDs and their respective CAD tools. PLDs programmed using latest relative CAD systems. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3650 - Introduction to Microprocessors

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CSCI 1170 and ET 3620. Covers architecture of microcontrollers and microprocessor-based systems and their related components. Machine language programming extensively used to solve problems and demonstrate the relationship of the microprocessor and its supporting peripherals. Basic microcomputer architecture also emphasized. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3670 - Computer-Assisted Printed Circuit Board Design

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 3620 and ET 3630 or permission of instructor. Utilizes computer software to develop skills in creating schematic and printed circuit board artwork for use in printed circuit board production. Includes plotting, printing, and generating all necessary documents required for fabrication. One hour lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4600 - Programmable Logic Controllers

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. Introduction to programmable logic controllers (PLCs). Selection, operation, and troubleshooting. Ladder diagrams and programming of PLC emphasized. One hour lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4660 - Microprocessor Interfacing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 3640 and ET 3650 or permission of instructor. Emphasis on interfacing various analog and digital devices to a microcontroller/microprocessor-based system: memory expansion, A/D and D/A, display devices, keyboards and keypads, electromechanical devices, and sensors. PLDs (FPGAs/CPLDs) interfaced to facilitate rapid prototyping of digital system design. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • CSCI 3160 - Introduction to Assembly Language

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CSCI 1170 or equivalent. Computer architecture and assembly language. Major emphasis on addressing techniques, macros, and program segmentation and linkage.

 

  • PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I  0 credit hours  (Nat Sci) AND

    PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2011. Web-based discussion class to be taken in conjunction with cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2011. Classical mechanics traditionally covered in a first-semester college physics course. Kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Class time used for discussion of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2010. Group-oriented problems course taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2010. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2010 discussion class. Covers kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

 

  • PHYS 2020 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics II

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2021. Web-based discussion class taken in conjunction with the cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2021. Fundamentals of optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. Scheduled class time is used for discussions of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2021 - Physics Problems Laboratory II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2020. Group-oriented problems course to be taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2020. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2020 discussion class. Optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. The skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

Choose 6 hours from:

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 33 Hours

 

Senior

 

  • CSCI 3180 - Introduction to Numerical Analysis

    3 credit hours

    (Same as MATH 3180.) Prerequisites: MATH 1920 and either CSCI 1160 or CSCI 1170. Topics include series approximation, finite differences interpolation, summation, numerical differentiation and integration, iteration, curve fitting, systems of equations and matrices, and error analysis.

  • ENGR 3915 - Technical Project Management and Soft Skills

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Project management as sanctioned by the International Project Management Institute and how to assess and boost emotional intelligence or soft skills. Student successfully completing course will earn 20 Professional Development Units (PDUs) issued by the International Project Management Institute.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4915.

  • ET 4610 - Instrumentation and Controls

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 3620 and ET 3630. Devices and techniques used in the measurement of physical parameters. Consideration of accuracies and sources of error, identification of typical measurements, sensors and transducers, control stability and response. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4670 - Microprocessor Design

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 3640 and ET 4660 or permission of instructor. Advanced microprocessor system design. Emphasis on the design of core CPUs and imbedded components using high-density FPGA/CPLD development boards. Industrial applications of microprocessor-based systems. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ENGR 3920 - Engineering Safety

    3 credit hours

    Safety and health in the manufacturing, construction, and utilities industries, including pertinent laws, codes, regulations, standards, and product liability considerations. Organizational and administrative principles and practices for safety management and safety engineering, accident investigation, safety education, and safety enforcement.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4420 - Industrial Safety.

  • ET 4801 - Computer Engineering Technology  1 to 3 credit hours  (3 credit hours required)

    ET 4801 - Computer Engineering Technology

    1 to 3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 4670; CSCI 3160. All required freshman-, sophomore-, and junior-level courses in all disciplines have to be completed before registering for this course. Engineering situations are solved by experimental means. Student must have experimental approach, gather data, interpret results, and prepare a formal technical written and oral report.

  • ENGR 3970 - Engineering Economy

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Development of capital budgets. Justification of capital projects using time value of money concepts. Replacement analysis. Review of justification of actual capital projects and computer applications. Introduces economic risk assessment and Lean Six Sigma from an economic viewpoint.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4970.

  • ET 4630 - Local Area Networks

    3 credit hours

    Provides the necessary foundation experience to understand the design, implementation, and management strategies of local and wide area networks (LAN/WAN). Data Communication Standards and protocol, fundamentals included. Will include lecture, laboratory activities, and a LAN design requirement. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4710 - Professional Development Seminar  1 credit hour credit hours  

    ET 4710 - Professional Development Seminar

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior status. Orientation to industrial job opportunities, placement practices, interview techniques, and preparation of application materials (resume, cover letter, and portfolio if warranted). Guest lecturers, films, and student and faculty presentations arranged in seminar fashion. One-hour lecture weekly.

  • ET 4640 - Industrial Electricity

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. AC power theory and circuits for industrial applications, polyphase systems, power factor correction, and transformers. Theory, applications, and selection of motors and generators. Industrial motor control and power transmission. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

Subtotal: 28 Hours

 


Engineering Technology, Electromechanical Engineering Technology Concentration, B.S.

Department of Engineering Technology 
615-898-2776
Chong Chen, program director
Chong.Chen@mtsu.edu

Engineering Technology is a technologically advanced program at the Bachelor of Science level utilizing theoretical concepts and hands-on instruction. Program selection is from the following concentrations: Computer Engineering Technology, Electromechanical Engineering Technology, and Mechanical Engineering Technology.

The Electromechanical Engineering Technology concentration requires 66 hours and is accredited by ABET, Inc. (http://www.abet.org) and is structured to prepare the student for positions in industry requiring the integration of electricity (for power and control) and mechanical devices (for force and motion) to perform tasks associated with manufacturing and the performance of services.

Employment opportunities exist in fields such as robotics, fluid power, industrial electricity, heating and air conditioning, and industrial automation. This concentration is in high demand from technology-based companies such as automotive and high-tech manufacturing operations.

NOTE: A grade of C or better is required on transfer credits accepted as part of a major in Engineering Technology.

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Engineering Technology, Electromechanical Engineering Technology, B.S., Academic Map  

Degree Requirements

General Education (41 hours)

General Education requirements (shown in curricular listings below) include courses in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences.

The following General Education courses are required for this major:

  • MATH 1730 (Math)
  • CHEM 1110/1111 (Nat Sci)
  • PHYS 2010/2011 (Nat Sci)

Major Requirements (66 hours)

Engineering Technology Core (22 hours)

  • ENGR 1100 - Engineering Fundamentals

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1630 or MATH 1730. Introduces various engineering fields. Emphasis on problem-solving techniques and the use of mathematics in analyzing technical problems. Topics such as graphical representation of data, estimation, dimensions, units, error estimates, statistics, and team work addressed. Engineering ethics and impact of engineering solutions on society and the environment.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 1840.

  • ENGR 3915 - Technical Project Management and Soft Skills

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Project management as sanctioned by the International Project Management Institute and how to assess and boost emotional intelligence or soft skills. Student successfully completing course will earn 20 Professional Development Units (PDUs) issued by the International Project Management Institute.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4915.

  • ENGR 3920 - Engineering Safety

    3 credit hours

    Safety and health in the manufacturing, construction, and utilities industries, including pertinent laws, codes, regulations, standards, and product liability considerations. Organizational and administrative principles and practices for safety management and safety engineering, accident investigation, safety education, and safety enforcement.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4420 - Industrial Safety.

  • ENGR 3970 - Engineering Economy

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Development of capital budgets. Justification of capital projects using time value of money concepts. Replacement analysis. Review of justification of actual capital projects and computer applications. Introduces economic risk assessment and Lean Six Sigma from an economic viewpoint.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4970.

  • ET 3601 - Electrical Circuit Analysis I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGR 1100. Corequisite: MATH 1910. Fundamentals of electrical circuits. Addresses basic circuit components and quantities. Emphasis on DC circuit calculations and theorems. Uses lab equipment to build and test DC circuits. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3602 - Electrical Circuit Analysis II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3601 and MATH 1910. Addresses basic circuit components and quantities of AC circuits. Introduces three-phase circuits and transformers. Emphasis on AC circuit calculations and theorems. Uses lab equipment to build and test AC circuits. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4710 - Professional Development Seminar  1 credit hour credit hours  

    ET 4710 - Professional Development Seminar

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior status. Orientation to industrial job opportunities, placement practices, interview techniques, and preparation of application materials (resume, cover letter, and portfolio if warranted). Guest lecturers, films, and student and faculty presentations arranged in seminar fashion. One-hour lecture weekly.

Electromechanical Engineering Technology Capstone

  • ET 4802 - Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology  1 to 3 credit hours  (3 credit hours required)

    ET 4802 - Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology

    1 to 3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 3650, ET 3860, ET 4610, and ET 4860. All required freshman-, sophomore-, and junior-level courses in all disciplines have to be completed before registering for this course. Engineering situations are solved by experimental means. Student must have experimental approach, gather data, interpret results, and prepare a formal technical written and oral report.

Electromechanical Engineering Technology Concentration (44 hours)

  • ENGR 1210 - Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Origin and behavior of materials. Classifications of materials. Physical metallurgy-mechanical and physical properties, crystalline structure, imperfections in solids, phase diagrams, failure mechanisms in materials, hardening and tempering, isothermal diagrams. Involves hands-on experiences through lab sessions in the use of metallurgical and mechanical testing equipment. Lecture and laboratory.

  • ENGR 2110 - Statics  3 credit hours  

    ENGR 2110 - Statics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGR 1100 and MATH 1910. Corequisite: PHYS 2011 or PHYS 2111. Mechatronics Engineering majors must complete PHYS 2111. Fundamental concepts and conditions of static equilibrium; their application to systems of forces and couples acting on rigid bodies; and the calculation of centers of gravity, centroids, and moments of inertia.

  • ET 2310 - Computer-Assisted Drafting and Design I

    3 credit hours

    Covers basic technical drawing/sketching and drafting concepts using personal computers, plotters, and appropriate CAD software. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.  

  • ET 3210 - Machine Tool Technology

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGR 1210 or ET 1210. Metals, their sources, manufacture, and properties; basic metalworking hand tools, measurements; layout; drawing and safety. Exercises in the use of the basic machine tools in machine shop work. Lecture and laboratory. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3360 - Computer-Assisted Drafting and Design II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CMT 3320 or ET 2310. Utilizes PC and CAD software to develop skills in the creation and analysis of mechanical solid models for design and production purposes. Includes the use of shading and rendering to enhance three-dimensional model display and the extraction of two-dimensional engineering drawings. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3620 - Digital Circuits Fundamentals

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3601 or permission of instructor. Provides thorough coverage of basic digital electronic circuits analysis and design. TTL and CMOS families examined. Number systems, mapping, and minimization techniques covered. Digital design using random logic and programmable logic devices (FPGAs and CPLDs). Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3630 - Electronics  3 credit hours  

    ET 3630 - Electronics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. Introduction to analog electronics. Defines basic parameters and theory of operation of discrete semiconductor devices. Introduces fundamentals of electronic circuits analysis and design. Applications illustrate use and laboratory projects provide hands-on experience. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3650 - Introduction to Microprocessors

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CSCI 1170 and ET 3620. Covers architecture of microcontrollers and microprocessor-based systems and their related components. Machine language programming extensively used to solve problems and demonstrate the relationship of the microprocessor and its supporting peripherals. Basic microcomputer architecture also emphasized. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3810 - Engineering Thermodynamics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGR 1100; PHYS 2010/PHYS 2011 or PHYS 2110/PHYS 2111; MATH 1910. Basic concepts of engineering thermodynamics, properties and thermodynamic states, work, heat, first law, second law, entropy, ideal gases, and analysis of conventional power and refrigeration systems.

  • ET 3860 - Strength of Materials

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGR 2110. The mechanics of materials emphasizing the analysis and design of statically determinate beams, columns, and structural members in torsion and application of the three moment equations to statically indeterminate beams.

  • ET 4600 - Programmable Logic Controllers

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. Introduction to programmable logic controllers (PLCs). Selection, operation, and troubleshooting. Ladder diagrams and programming of PLC emphasized. One hour lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4610 - Instrumentation and Controls

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 3620 and ET 3630. Devices and techniques used in the measurement of physical parameters. Consideration of accuracies and sources of error, identification of typical measurements, sensors and transducers, control stability and response. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4640 - Industrial Electricity

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. AC power theory and circuits for industrial applications, polyphase systems, power factor correction, and transformers. Theory, applications, and selection of motors and generators. Industrial motor control and power transmission. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4850 - Fluid Power  3 credit hours  

    ET 4850 - Fluid Power

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGR 1100, ET 3810. Systems and the basic components that make up these systems, including hydraulic, pneumatic, and fluidic. Emphasis on understanding the language and graphic symbols associated with fluid power, the performance characteristics of system components, and problem solving. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4860 - Robotics  3 credit hours  

    ET 4860 - Robotics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: MATH 1910; CSCI (3 hours). Fundamentals of robots. Types of robots, types of controls, the prime movers, the application of robots in the industrial environment, and problem solving. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

Supporting Courses (17 hours)

  • CSCI 1170 - Computer Science I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. The first of a two-semester sequence using a high-level language; language constructs and simple data structures such as arrays and strings. Emphasis on problem solving using the language and principles of structured software development. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hour.

  • MATH 1730 - Pre-Calculus  4 credit hours  (3 credit hours counted in General Education, 1 credit hour remaining)

    MATH 1730 - Pre-Calculus

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 or successful completion of high school precalculus course. An integrated and rigorous study of the algebra and trigonometry needed to successfully attempt calculus. Emphasis on functions, their analysis and their applications. Level of algebraic sophistication developed above that found in MATH 1710. Topics include exponentials and logarithms, analysis of graphs, and word problems. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 2110 - Data Analysis  1 credit hour credit hours  

    MATH 2110 - Data Analysis

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite or corequisite: MATH 1530 or MATH 2050 or equivalent. Using computer software for graphing and analysis of scientific and statistical data.

 

  • MATH 1530 - Applied Statistics  3 credit hours  OR

    MATH 1530 - Applied Statistics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra and a Math Enhanced ACT 19 or greater or equivalent. Descriptive statistics, probability, and statistical inference. The inference unit covers means, proportions, and variances for one and two samples, and topics from one-way ANOVA, regression and correlation analysis, chi-square analysis, and nonparametrics.

  • PSY 3020 - Basic Statistics for Behavioral Science

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: 3 credit hours of college-level mathematics. PSY 3030 may be required. (See online schedule.) Elementary descriptive and inferential statistics and their applications.

 

  • PHYS 2020 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics II

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2021. Web-based discussion class taken in conjunction with the cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2021. Fundamentals of optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. Scheduled class time is used for discussions of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2021 - Physics Problems Laboratory II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2020. Group-oriented problems course to be taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2020. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2020 discussion class. Optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. The skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

Total hours in program: 124

 

Curriculum: Engineering Technology, Electromechanical Engineering Technology

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

Students should consult their advisors each semester to plan their schedules.

Freshman

 

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • MATH 1730 - Pre-Calculus  4 credit hours  (Math)

    MATH 1730 - Pre-Calculus

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 or successful completion of high school precalculus course. An integrated and rigorous study of the algebra and trigonometry needed to successfully attempt calculus. Emphasis on functions, their analysis and their applications. Level of algebraic sophistication developed above that found in MATH 1710. Topics include exponentials and logarithms, analysis of graphs, and word problems. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • ENGR 1100 - Engineering Fundamentals

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1630 or MATH 1730. Introduces various engineering fields. Emphasis on problem-solving techniques and the use of mathematics in analyzing technical problems. Topics such as graphical representation of data, estimation, dimensions, units, error estimates, statistics, and team work addressed. Engineering ethics and impact of engineering solutions on society and the environment.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 1840.

  • ENGR 1210 - Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Origin and behavior of materials. Classifications of materials. Physical metallurgy-mechanical and physical properties, crystalline structure, imperfections in solids, phase diagrams, failure mechanisms in materials, hardening and tempering, isothermal diagrams. Involves hands-on experiences through lab sessions in the use of metallurgical and mechanical testing equipment. Lecture and laboratory.

  • ET 2310 - Computer-Assisted Drafting and Design I

    3 credit hours

    Covers basic technical drawing/sketching and drafting concepts using personal computers, plotters, and appropriate CAD software. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.  

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours

 

  • CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci)

    CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: High school chemistry. Corequisite: CHEM 1111. Fundamental concepts of atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometric relationships, periodic properties of the elements, thermochemistry, and properties of gases. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

Subtotal: 33 Hours

 

Sophomore

 

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

 

  • MATH 1530 - Applied Statistics  3 credit hours  OR

    MATH 1530 - Applied Statistics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra and a Math Enhanced ACT 19 or greater or equivalent. Descriptive statistics, probability, and statistical inference. The inference unit covers means, proportions, and variances for one and two samples, and topics from one-way ANOVA, regression and correlation analysis, chi-square analysis, and nonparametrics.

  • PSY 3020 - Basic Statistics for Behavioral Science

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: 3 credit hours of college-level mathematics. PSY 3030 may be required. (See online schedule.) Elementary descriptive and inferential statistics and their applications.

 

  • PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I  0 credit hours  (Nat Sci)

    PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2011. Web-based discussion class to be taken in conjunction with cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2011. Classical mechanics traditionally covered in a first-semester college physics course. Kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Class time used for discussion of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci)

    PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2010. Group-oriented problems course taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2010. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2010 discussion class. Covers kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

 

  • ET 3210 - Machine Tool Technology

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGR 1210 or ET 1210. Metals, their sources, manufacture, and properties; basic metalworking hand tools, measurements; layout; drawing and safety. Exercises in the use of the basic machine tools in machine shop work. Lecture and laboratory. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3601 - Electrical Circuit Analysis I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGR 1100. Corequisite: MATH 1910. Fundamentals of electrical circuits. Addresses basic circuit components and quantities. Emphasis on DC circuit calculations and theorems. Uses lab equipment to build and test DC circuits. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3602 - Electrical Circuit Analysis II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3601 and MATH 1910. Addresses basic circuit components and quantities of AC circuits. Introduces three-phase circuits and transformers. Emphasis on AC circuit calculations and theorems. Uses lab equipment to build and test AC circuits. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3620 - Digital Circuits Fundamentals

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3601 or permission of instructor. Provides thorough coverage of basic digital electronic circuits analysis and design. TTL and CMOS families examined. Number systems, mapping, and minimization techniques covered. Digital design using random logic and programmable logic devices (FPGAs and CPLDs). Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3360 - Computer-Assisted Drafting and Design II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CMT 3320 or ET 2310. Utilizes PC and CAD software to develop skills in the creation and analysis of mechanical solid models for design and production purposes. Includes the use of shading and rendering to enhance three-dimensional model display and the extraction of two-dimensional engineering drawings. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

Choose 6 hours from:

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 31 Hours

 

Junior

 

  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours
  • MATH 2110 - Data Analysis  1 credit hour credit hours  

    MATH 2110 - Data Analysis

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite or corequisite: MATH 1530 or MATH 2050 or equivalent. Using computer software for graphing and analysis of scientific and statistical data.

  • CSCI 1170 - Computer Science I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. The first of a two-semester sequence using a high-level language; language constructs and simple data structures such as arrays and strings. Emphasis on problem solving using the language and principles of structured software development. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hour.

  • ENGR 2110 - Statics  3 credit hours  

    ENGR 2110 - Statics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGR 1100 and MATH 1910. Corequisite: PHYS 2011 or PHYS 2111. Mechatronics Engineering majors must complete PHYS 2111. Fundamental concepts and conditions of static equilibrium; their application to systems of forces and couples acting on rigid bodies; and the calculation of centers of gravity, centroids, and moments of inertia.

  • ET 3630 - Electronics  3 credit hours  

    ET 3630 - Electronics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. Introduction to analog electronics. Defines basic parameters and theory of operation of discrete semiconductor devices. Introduces fundamentals of electronic circuits analysis and design. Applications illustrate use and laboratory projects provide hands-on experience. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3810 - Engineering Thermodynamics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGR 1100; PHYS 2010/PHYS 2011 or PHYS 2110/PHYS 2111; MATH 1910. Basic concepts of engineering thermodynamics, properties and thermodynamic states, work, heat, first law, second law, entropy, ideal gases, and analysis of conventional power and refrigeration systems.

  • ET 3860 - Strength of Materials

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGR 2110. The mechanics of materials emphasizing the analysis and design of statically determinate beams, columns, and structural members in torsion and application of the three moment equations to statically indeterminate beams.

  • ENGR 3920 - Engineering Safety

    3 credit hours

    Safety and health in the manufacturing, construction, and utilities industries, including pertinent laws, codes, regulations, standards, and product liability considerations. Organizational and administrative principles and practices for safety management and safety engineering, accident investigation, safety education, and safety enforcement.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4420 - Industrial Safety.

 

  • PHYS 2020 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics II

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2021. Web-based discussion class taken in conjunction with the cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2021. Fundamentals of optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. Scheduled class time is used for discussions of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2021 - Physics Problems Laboratory II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2020. Group-oriented problems course to be taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2020. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2020 discussion class. Optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. The skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Senior

 

  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours
  • ENGR 3915 - Technical Project Management and Soft Skills

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Project management as sanctioned by the International Project Management Institute and how to assess and boost emotional intelligence or soft skills. Student successfully completing course will earn 20 Professional Development Units (PDUs) issued by the International Project Management Institute.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4915.

  • ET 3650 - Introduction to Microprocessors

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CSCI 1170 and ET 3620. Covers architecture of microcontrollers and microprocessor-based systems and their related components. Machine language programming extensively used to solve problems and demonstrate the relationship of the microprocessor and its supporting peripherals. Basic microcomputer architecture also emphasized. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4600 - Programmable Logic Controllers

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. Introduction to programmable logic controllers (PLCs). Selection, operation, and troubleshooting. Ladder diagrams and programming of PLC emphasized. One hour lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4610 - Instrumentation and Controls

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 3620 and ET 3630. Devices and techniques used in the measurement of physical parameters. Consideration of accuracies and sources of error, identification of typical measurements, sensors and transducers, control stability and response. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4640 - Industrial Electricity

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. AC power theory and circuits for industrial applications, polyphase systems, power factor correction, and transformers. Theory, applications, and selection of motors and generators. Industrial motor control and power transmission. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4710 - Professional Development Seminar  1 credit hour credit hours  

    ET 4710 - Professional Development Seminar

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior status. Orientation to industrial job opportunities, placement practices, interview techniques, and preparation of application materials (resume, cover letter, and portfolio if warranted). Guest lecturers, films, and student and faculty presentations arranged in seminar fashion. One-hour lecture weekly.

  • ET 4802 - Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology  1 to 3 credit hours  (3 credit hours required)

    ET 4802 - Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology

    1 to 3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 3650, ET 3860, ET 4610, and ET 4860. All required freshman-, sophomore-, and junior-level courses in all disciplines have to be completed before registering for this course. Engineering situations are solved by experimental means. Student must have experimental approach, gather data, interpret results, and prepare a formal technical written and oral report.

  • ET 4850 - Fluid Power  3 credit hours  

    ET 4850 - Fluid Power

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGR 1100, ET 3810. Systems and the basic components that make up these systems, including hydraulic, pneumatic, and fluidic. Emphasis on understanding the language and graphic symbols associated with fluid power, the performance characteristics of system components, and problem solving. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4860 - Robotics  3 credit hours  

    ET 4860 - Robotics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: MATH 1910; CSCI (3 hours). Fundamentals of robots. Types of robots, types of controls, the prime movers, the application of robots in the industrial environment, and problem solving. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ENGR 3970 - Engineering Economy

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Development of capital budgets. Justification of capital projects using time value of money concepts. Replacement analysis. Review of justification of actual capital projects and computer applications. Introduces economic risk assessment and Lean Six Sigma from an economic viewpoint.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4970.

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 


Engineering Technology, Mechanical Engineering Technology Concentration, B.S.

Department of Engineering Technology 
615-898-2776
Sid Sridhara, program coordinator
Sid.Sridhara@mtsu.edu

Engineering Technology is a technologically advanced program at the Bachelor of Science level utilizing theoretical concepts and hands-on instruction. Program selection is from the following concentrations: Computer Engineering Technology, Electromechanical Engineering Technology, and Mechanical Engineering Technology.

The Mechanical Engineering Technology concentration requires 67 hours is accredited by ABET, Inc. (http://www.abet.org) and enables students to obtain the skills necessary for placement in highly competitive jobs in machine design, manufacturing, engineering, field service engineering, technical sales, thermal analysis, product design, utilities operations, air conditioning design, plant operations, and a variety of other professions. Through design projects and laboratory training, students examine how to relate such skills to a variety of fields in mechanical engineering technology including product and machine design, power generation, utilities, and manufacturing. The educational quality of this program is especially high in that it provides students with the opportunity to mesh their in-class experiences with project-oriented assignments and real-world experience in national competitions such as the Great Moonbuggy Race, the Solar BikeRayce, SAE Formula One Collegiate Competition, Space Elevator, USLI Rocket Launch, and the Mini Baja Race.

The prospects for a graduate in mechanical engineering technology are as broad as the major concentration itself. Graduates can expect opportunities to work on a variety of projects from developing and producing engines and transportation equipment in the automobile, ship, rail, and aviation industries to working as a member on an engineering technologist design team to improve high-performance automobiles and air-conditioned environments. Students graduating from mechanical engineering technology programs often find themselves in highly responsible, challenging, and extremely rewarding positions.

NOTE: A grade of C or better is required on transfer credits accepted as part of a major in Engineering Technology.

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Engineering Technology, Mechanical Engineering Technology, B.S., Academic Map  

Degree Requirements

General Education (41 hours)

General Education requirements (shown in curricular listings below) include courses in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences.

The following General Education courses are required for this major:

  • MATH 1730 (Math)
  • CHEM 1110/1111 (Nat Sci)
  • PHYS 2010/2011 (Nat Sci)

Major Requirements (67 hours)

Engineering Technology Core (22 hours)

  • ENGR 1100 - Engineering Fundamentals

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1630 or MATH 1730. Introduces various engineering fields. Emphasis on problem-solving techniques and the use of mathematics in analyzing technical problems. Topics such as graphical representation of data, estimation, dimensions, units, error estimates, statistics, and team work addressed. Engineering ethics and impact of engineering solutions on society and the environment.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 1840.

  • ENGR 3915 - Technical Project Management and Soft Skills

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Project management as sanctioned by the International Project Management Institute and how to assess and boost emotional intelligence or soft skills. Student successfully completing course will earn 20 Professional Development Units (PDUs) issued by the International Project Management Institute.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4915.

  • ENGR 3920 - Engineering Safety

    3 credit hours

    Safety and health in the manufacturing, construction, and utilities industries, including pertinent laws, codes, regulations, standards, and product liability considerations. Organizational and administrative principles and practices for safety management and safety engineering, accident investigation, safety education, and safety enforcement.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4420 - Industrial Safety.

  • ENGR 3970 - Engineering Economy

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Development of capital budgets. Justification of capital projects using time value of money concepts. Replacement analysis. Review of justification of actual capital projects and computer applications. Introduces economic risk assessment and Lean Six Sigma from an economic viewpoint.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4970.

  • ET 3601 - Electrical Circuit Analysis I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGR 1100. Corequisite: MATH 1910. Fundamentals of electrical circuits. Addresses basic circuit components and quantities. Emphasis on DC circuit calculations and theorems. Uses lab equipment to build and test DC circuits. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3602 - Electrical Circuit Analysis II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3601 and MATH 1910. Addresses basic circuit components and quantities of AC circuits. Introduces three-phase circuits and transformers. Emphasis on AC circuit calculations and theorems. Uses lab equipment to build and test AC circuits. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4710 - Professional Development Seminar  1 credit hour credit hours  

    ET 4710 - Professional Development Seminar

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior status. Orientation to industrial job opportunities, placement practices, interview techniques, and preparation of application materials (resume, cover letter, and portfolio if warranted). Guest lecturers, films, and student and faculty presentations arranged in seminar fashion. One-hour lecture weekly.

Mechanical Engineering Technology Capstone

 

  • ET 4803 - Mechanical Engineering Technology  1 to 3 credit hours  (3 credit hours required)

    ET 4803 - Mechanical Engineering Technology

    1 to 3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 3860, ET 4340, and ET 4815. All required freshman-, sophomore-, and junior-level courses in all disciplines have to be completed before registering for this course. Engineering situations are solved by experimental means. Student must have experimental approach, gather data, interpret results, and prepare a formal technical written and oral report.

Mechanical Engineering Technology Concentration (45 hours)

  • ENGR 1210 - Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Origin and behavior of materials. Classifications of materials. Physical metallurgy-mechanical and physical properties, crystalline structure, imperfections in solids, phase diagrams, failure mechanisms in materials, hardening and tempering, isothermal diagrams. Involves hands-on experiences through lab sessions in the use of metallurgical and mechanical testing equipment. Lecture and laboratory.

  • ENGR 2110 - Statics  3 credit hours  

    ENGR 2110 - Statics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGR 1100 and MATH 1910. Corequisite: PHYS 2011 or PHYS 2111. Mechatronics Engineering majors must complete PHYS 2111. Fundamental concepts and conditions of static equilibrium; their application to systems of forces and couples acting on rigid bodies; and the calculation of centers of gravity, centroids, and moments of inertia.

  • ENGR 2120 - Dynamics  3 credit hours  

    ENGR 2120 - Dynamics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGR 2110 and MATH 1920. Kinematics of particles in rectilinear and curvilinear motions. Kinetics of particles, Newton's second law, energy and momentum methods. Systems of particles, Kinematics and plane motion of rigid bodies, forces and accelerations, energy and momentum methods. Introduction to mechanical vibrations.

  • ET 2310 - Computer-Assisted Drafting and Design I

    3 credit hours

    Covers basic technical drawing/sketching and drafting concepts using personal computers, plotters, and appropriate CAD software. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.  

  • ET 2920 - Industrial Orientation Internship  1 to 3 credit hours  (1 credit hour required)

    ET 2920 - Industrial Orientation Internship

    1 to 3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Provides industrial exposure for students with little or no industrial work experience. Students will be placed in an acceptable company for introductory industrial experiences. Arrangement for this course must be made in advance. Students may take from one to three credit hours; may be repeated for up to a maximum of three credit hours. Pass/Fail.

  • ET 3210 - Machine Tool Technology

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGR 1210 or ET 1210. Metals, their sources, manufacture, and properties; basic metalworking hand tools, measurements; layout; drawing and safety. Exercises in the use of the basic machine tools in machine shop work. Lecture and laboratory. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3360 - Computer-Assisted Drafting and Design II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CMT 3320 or ET 2310. Utilizes PC and CAD software to develop skills in the creation and analysis of mechanical solid models for design and production purposes. Includes the use of shading and rendering to enhance three-dimensional model display and the extraction of two-dimensional engineering drawings. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3810 - Engineering Thermodynamics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGR 1100; PHYS 2010/PHYS 2011 or PHYS 2110/PHYS 2111; MATH 1910. Basic concepts of engineering thermodynamics, properties and thermodynamic states, work, heat, first law, second law, entropy, ideal gases, and analysis of conventional power and refrigeration systems.

  • ET 3860 - Strength of Materials

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGR 2110. The mechanics of materials emphasizing the analysis and design of statically determinate beams, columns, and structural members in torsion and application of the three moment equations to statically indeterminate beams.

  • ET 4330 - Advanced Computer-Aided Drafting

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3360 or permission of instructor. Topics include customizing menus, 3-D concepts and surface modeling, AutoLisp, rendering, and slide shows. Interactive computer drafting and design using advanced AutoCAD software and add-ons. Primarily for students who want to increase their capabilities using CAD. One hour lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4340 - Design of Machine Elements

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3860. Analytical design methods. Stress analysis, working stress, combined stresses, failure theories, fatigue failure. Design techniques for shafts, fasteners, gears, bearings, and belt and chain drives. Includes a design project.

  • ET 4815 - Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3810 or permission of instructor. Design and operation of heat and mass transfer systems which produce the needed environments for manufacturing operations, industrial processes, and human comfort. Systems that use mechanical equipment such as pumps, blowers, fans, compressors, and heat exchanges found in fields such as air conditioning, low temperature metallurgy, food preservation, chemical processing, and industrial manufacturing covered. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4830 - Vibration  3 credit hours  

    ET 4830 - Vibration

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGR 2120 or ET 3840. Provides a broad-based background in vibration analysis and introduces present practices. Topics include free, damped, and forced vibrations with one degree of freedom; vibration isolation; free vibration with two degrees of freedom; and introduction to matrix formulation. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4850 - Fluid Power  3 credit hours  

    ET 4850 - Fluid Power

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGR 1100, ET 3810. Systems and the basic components that make up these systems, including hydraulic, pneumatic, and fluidic. Emphasis on understanding the language and graphic symbols associated with fluid power, the performance characteristics of system components, and problem solving. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4860 - Robotics  3 credit hours  

    ET 4860 - Robotics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: MATH 1910; CSCI (3 hours). Fundamentals of robots. Types of robots, types of controls, the prime movers, the application of robots in the industrial environment, and problem solving. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

Supporting Courses (16 hours)

  • CSCI 1170 - Computer Science I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. The first of a two-semester sequence using a high-level language; language constructs and simple data structures such as arrays and strings. Emphasis on problem solving using the language and principles of structured software development. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hour.

  • MATH 1730 - Pre-Calculus  4 credit hours  (3 credit hours counted in General Education, 1 credit hour remaining)

    MATH 1730 - Pre-Calculus

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 or successful completion of high school precalculus course. An integrated and rigorous study of the algebra and trigonometry needed to successfully attempt calculus. Emphasis on functions, their analysis and their applications. Level of algebraic sophistication developed above that found in MATH 1710. Topics include exponentials and logarithms, analysis of graphs, and word problems. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1920 - Calculus II  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1920 - Calculus II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910 with C (2.00) or better. A topics course providing a wide view of different techniques and applications of calculus in the plane. Techniques of integration and applications of integration fully developed. Power series and Taylor series included. Emphasis on multidisciplinary applications includes Taylor series approximation; applications of integration to physics, biology, and business; and geometric and power series applications. Graphing calculator required.

  • ENGL 3620 - Professional Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Completion of English and literature General Education requirements; ENGL 1020 or ENGL 3605 with a B or better. A specialized composition course for students planning to enter the professional workplace, including industry, science, and government. Collaborative practice in the discourse and conventions of professional and technical writing: employment packages, memoranda, instructions, proposals, and reports.

Total hours in program: 124

 

Curriculum: Engineering Technology, Mechanical Engineering Technology

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

Students should consult their advisors each semester to plan their schedules.

Freshman

 

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • MATH 1730 - Pre-Calculus  4 credit hours  (Math)

    MATH 1730 - Pre-Calculus

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 or successful completion of high school precalculus course. An integrated and rigorous study of the algebra and trigonometry needed to successfully attempt calculus. Emphasis on functions, their analysis and their applications. Level of algebraic sophistication developed above that found in MATH 1710. Topics include exponentials and logarithms, analysis of graphs, and word problems. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • ENGR 1100 - Engineering Fundamentals

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1630 or MATH 1730. Introduces various engineering fields. Emphasis on problem-solving techniques and the use of mathematics in analyzing technical problems. Topics such as graphical representation of data, estimation, dimensions, units, error estimates, statistics, and team work addressed. Engineering ethics and impact of engineering solutions on society and the environment.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 1840.

  • ENGR 1210 - Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Origin and behavior of materials. Classifications of materials. Physical metallurgy-mechanical and physical properties, crystalline structure, imperfections in solids, phase diagrams, failure mechanisms in materials, hardening and tempering, isothermal diagrams. Involves hands-on experiences through lab sessions in the use of metallurgical and mechanical testing equipment. Lecture and laboratory.

  • ET 2310 - Computer-Assisted Drafting and Design I

    3 credit hours

    Covers basic technical drawing/sketching and drafting concepts using personal computers, plotters, and appropriate CAD software. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.  

  • CSCI 1170 - Computer Science I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. The first of a two-semester sequence using a high-level language; language constructs and simple data structures such as arrays and strings. Emphasis on problem solving using the language and principles of structured software development. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hour.

 

  • CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci)

    CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: High school chemistry. Corequisite: CHEM 1111. Fundamental concepts of atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometric relationships, periodic properties of the elements, thermochemistry, and properties of gases. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

Subtotal: 31 Hours

 

Sophomore

 

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

 

  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts (2 prefixes) 6 credit hours
  • MATH 1920 - Calculus II  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1920 - Calculus II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910 with C (2.00) or better. A topics course providing a wide view of different techniques and applications of calculus in the plane. Techniques of integration and applications of integration fully developed. Power series and Taylor series included. Emphasis on multidisciplinary applications includes Taylor series approximation; applications of integration to physics, biology, and business; and geometric and power series applications. Graphing calculator required.

  • ENGR 2110 - Statics  3 credit hours  

    ENGR 2110 - Statics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGR 1100 and MATH 1910. Corequisite: PHYS 2011 or PHYS 2111. Mechatronics Engineering majors must complete PHYS 2111. Fundamental concepts and conditions of static equilibrium; their application to systems of forces and couples acting on rigid bodies; and the calculation of centers of gravity, centroids, and moments of inertia.

  • ET 3210 - Machine Tool Technology

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGR 1210 or ET 1210. Metals, their sources, manufacture, and properties; basic metalworking hand tools, measurements; layout; drawing and safety. Exercises in the use of the basic machine tools in machine shop work. Lecture and laboratory. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3360 - Computer-Assisted Drafting and Design II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CMT 3320 or ET 2310. Utilizes PC and CAD software to develop skills in the creation and analysis of mechanical solid models for design and production purposes. Includes the use of shading and rendering to enhance three-dimensional model display and the extraction of two-dimensional engineering drawings. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3601 - Electrical Circuit Analysis I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGR 1100. Corequisite: MATH 1910. Fundamentals of electrical circuits. Addresses basic circuit components and quantities. Emphasis on DC circuit calculations and theorems. Uses lab equipment to build and test DC circuits. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I  0 credit hours  (Nat Sci)

    PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2011. Web-based discussion class to be taken in conjunction with cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2011. Classical mechanics traditionally covered in a first-semester college physics course. Kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Class time used for discussion of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci)

    PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2010. Group-oriented problems course taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2010. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2010 discussion class. Covers kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

 

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 32 Hours

 

Junior

 

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • Social/Behavioral Sciences (2 prefixes) 6  credit hours
  • ENGL 3620 - Professional Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Completion of English and literature General Education requirements; ENGL 1020 or ENGL 3605 with a B or better. A specialized composition course for students planning to enter the professional workplace, including industry, science, and government. Collaborative practice in the discourse and conventions of professional and technical writing: employment packages, memoranda, instructions, proposals, and reports.

  • ENGR 2120 - Dynamics  3 credit hours  

    ENGR 2120 - Dynamics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGR 2110 and MATH 1920. Kinematics of particles in rectilinear and curvilinear motions. Kinetics of particles, Newton's second law, energy and momentum methods. Systems of particles, Kinematics and plane motion of rigid bodies, forces and accelerations, energy and momentum methods. Introduction to mechanical vibrations.

  • ET 3602 - Electrical Circuit Analysis II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3601 and MATH 1910. Addresses basic circuit components and quantities of AC circuits. Introduces three-phase circuits and transformers. Emphasis on AC circuit calculations and theorems. Uses lab equipment to build and test AC circuits. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3810 - Engineering Thermodynamics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGR 1100; PHYS 2010/PHYS 2011 or PHYS 2110/PHYS 2111; MATH 1910. Basic concepts of engineering thermodynamics, properties and thermodynamic states, work, heat, first law, second law, entropy, ideal gases, and analysis of conventional power and refrigeration systems.

  • ET 3860 - Strength of Materials

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGR 2110. The mechanics of materials emphasizing the analysis and design of statically determinate beams, columns, and structural members in torsion and application of the three moment equations to statically indeterminate beams.

  • ET 4330 - Advanced Computer-Aided Drafting

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3360 or permission of instructor. Topics include customizing menus, 3-D concepts and surface modeling, AutoLisp, rendering, and slide shows. Interactive computer drafting and design using advanced AutoCAD software and add-ons. Primarily for students who want to increase their capabilities using CAD. One hour lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 32 Hours

 

Senior

 

  • ET 4340 - Design of Machine Elements

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3860. Analytical design methods. Stress analysis, working stress, combined stresses, failure theories, fatigue failure. Design techniques for shafts, fasteners, gears, bearings, and belt and chain drives. Includes a design project.

  • ENGR 3920 - Engineering Safety

    3 credit hours

    Safety and health in the manufacturing, construction, and utilities industries, including pertinent laws, codes, regulations, standards, and product liability considerations. Organizational and administrative principles and practices for safety management and safety engineering, accident investigation, safety education, and safety enforcement.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4420 - Industrial Safety.

  • ET 4710 - Professional Development Seminar  1 credit hour credit hours  

    ET 4710 - Professional Development Seminar

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior status. Orientation to industrial job opportunities, placement practices, interview techniques, and preparation of application materials (resume, cover letter, and portfolio if warranted). Guest lecturers, films, and student and faculty presentations arranged in seminar fashion. One-hour lecture weekly.

  • ET 4850 - Fluid Power  3 credit hours  

    ET 4850 - Fluid Power

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGR 1100, ET 3810. Systems and the basic components that make up these systems, including hydraulic, pneumatic, and fluidic. Emphasis on understanding the language and graphic symbols associated with fluid power, the performance characteristics of system components, and problem solving. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ENGR 3970 - Engineering Economy

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Development of capital budgets. Justification of capital projects using time value of money concepts. Replacement analysis. Review of justification of actual capital projects and computer applications. Introduces economic risk assessment and Lean Six Sigma from an economic viewpoint.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4970.

  • ET 4815 - Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3810 or permission of instructor. Design and operation of heat and mass transfer systems which produce the needed environments for manufacturing operations, industrial processes, and human comfort. Systems that use mechanical equipment such as pumps, blowers, fans, compressors, and heat exchanges found in fields such as air conditioning, low temperature metallurgy, food preservation, chemical processing, and industrial manufacturing covered. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4860 - Robotics  3 credit hours  

    ET 4860 - Robotics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: MATH 1910; CSCI (3 hours). Fundamentals of robots. Types of robots, types of controls, the prime movers, the application of robots in the industrial environment, and problem solving. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4803 - Mechanical Engineering Technology  1 to 3 credit hours  (3 credit hours)

    ET 4803 - Mechanical Engineering Technology

    1 to 3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 3860, ET 4340, and ET 4815. All required freshman-, sophomore-, and junior-level courses in all disciplines have to be completed before registering for this course. Engineering situations are solved by experimental means. Student must have experimental approach, gather data, interpret results, and prepare a formal technical written and oral report.

  • ET 4830 - Vibration  3 credit hours  

    ET 4830 - Vibration

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGR 2120 or ET 3840. Provides a broad-based background in vibration analysis and introduces present practices. Topics include free, damped, and forced vibrations with one degree of freedom; vibration isolation; free vibration with two degrees of freedom; and introduction to matrix formulation. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ENGR 3915 - Technical Project Management and Soft Skills

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Project management as sanctioned by the International Project Management Institute and how to assess and boost emotional intelligence or soft skills. Student successfully completing course will earn 20 Professional Development Units (PDUs) issued by the International Project Management Institute.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4915.

  • ET 2920 - Industrial Orientation Internship

    1 to 3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Provides industrial exposure for students with little or no industrial work experience. Students will be placed in an acceptable company for introductory industrial experiences. Arrangement for this course must be made in advance. Students may take from one to three credit hours; may be repeated for up to a maximum of three credit hours. Pass/Fail.

Subtotal: 29 Hours

 


Dr. Walter Boles

walter.boles@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Carol Boraiko
Associate Professor
carol.boraiko@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Chong Chen
Professor
chong.chen@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Saeed Foroudastan
Associate Dean | MSPS Program Director
saeed.foroudastan@mtsu.edu

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David Gore
Associate Professor
david.gore@mtsu.edu

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Thomas Gormley
Associate Professor
thomas.gormley@mtsu.edu

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Dr. David Hatfield
Professor
david.hatfield@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Vahid Khiabani
Assistant Professor | Engineering Management Coordinator
Vahid.Khiabani@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Kathy Mathis
Associate Professor
kathy.mathis@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Ahad Nasab
Professor | Program Coordinator
ahad.nasab@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Charles Perry
Professor
charles.perry@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Karim Salman
Associate Professor
karim.salman@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Saleh Sbenaty
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saleh.sbenaty@mtsu.edu

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Dr. B. S. Sridhara
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sid.sridhara@mtsu.edu

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Rick Taylor
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Eddie D. Vanhook
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Environmental Sustainability and Technology

ENGR 1100 - Engineering Fundamentals
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 1630 or MATH 1730. Introduces various engineering fields. Emphasis on problem-solving techniques and the use of mathematics in analyzing technical problems. Topics such as graphical representation of data, estimation, dimensions, units, error estimates, statistics, and team work addressed. Engineering ethics and impact of engineering solutions on society and the environment.

NOTE: This was formerly ET 1840.

ENGR 1210 - Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Origin and behavior of materials. Classifications of materials. Physical metallurgy-mechanical and physical properties, crystalline structure, imperfections in solids, phase diagrams, failure mechanisms in materials, hardening and tempering, isothermal diagrams. Involves hands-on experiences through lab sessions in the use of metallurgical and mechanical testing equipment. Lecture and laboratory.

ENGR 2100 - Introduction to Engineering Design
3 credit hours

Introduction to computer-aided design (CAD) for product design, modeling, and prototyping. Individual use and team-based environment to design and prototype a functional and manufacturable marketable product. Application to design, manufacturing, and analysis using geometric tolerancing and dimensioning. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ENGR 2110 - Statics
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ENGR 1100 and MATH 1910. Corequisite: PHYS 2011 or PHYS 2111. Mechatronics Engineering majors must complete PHYS 2111. Fundamental concepts and conditions of static equilibrium; their application to systems of forces and couples acting on rigid bodies; and the calculation of centers of gravity, centroids, and moments of inertia.

ENGR 2120 - Dynamics
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ENGR 2110 and MATH 1920. Kinematics of particles in rectilinear and curvilinear motions. Kinetics of particles, Newton's second law, energy and momentum methods. Systems of particles, Kinematics and plane motion of rigid bodies, forces and accelerations, energy and momentum methods. Introduction to mechanical vibrations.

ENGR 2130 - Electrical Circuit Analysis I
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ENGR 1100 and MATH 1910. Fundamentals of electrical circuits. Volt-ampere characteristics for circuit elements; independent and dependent sources; Kirchhoff's laws and circuit equations. Source transformations; Thevenlin's and Norton's theorems; superposition. Phasor analysis, impedance calculations, and computation of sinusoidal steady state responses. AC power, maximum power transfer, and three-phase circuits. Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

ENGR 3510 - Electrical Circuit Analysis II
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ENGR 2130 and MATH 3120. Analysis of the RC and RL first-order circuits. Use of Laplace Transform techniques to analyze linear circuits with and without initial conditions. Characterization of circuits based upon impedance, admittance, and transfer function parameters. Fourier series, circuit analysis with Fourier transform, determination of frequency response of circuits, filter design. Lecture.

ENGR 3520 - Digital Circuits Fundamentals
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ENGR 2130. Introduces logic design with emphasis on practical design techniques and circuit implementation. Topics include Boolean algebra; theory of logic functions; mapping techniques and function minimization; logic equivalent circuits and symbol transformations; transistor-transistor-logic (TTL)/metal oxide semi-conductor (MOS) logic into gate implementations; electrical characteristics; propagation delays; signed number notations and arithmetic. Digital design using random logic and programmable logic devices (FPGAs and CPLDs). Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ENGR 3530 - Electronics and Instrumentation
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ENGR 2130. Introduces use and analysis of electronic circuits and input mechanism of various sensors, design of analog signal conditioning systems based on the system requirement, as well as understanding the theory and the art of modern instrumentation and measurements (I&M) systems. Topics include BJT and MOSFET circuit model and analysis; operational amplifier; instrumentation amplifier; survey of sensor input mechanisms; analog signal conditioning and sensor application; measurement system architecture; errors in measurement; standard used in measurement. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ENGR 3550 - Fluid Mechanics
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ENGR 2120 and MATH 3110. Continuum, velocity field, fluid statics, manometers, basic conservation laws for systems and control volumes, dimensional analysis. Euler and Bernoulli equations, viscous flows, boundary layers, flow in channels and around submerged bodies, one-dimensional gas dynamics, turbo-machinery. Applications in hydraulic, pneumatic, and fluidics discussed. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ENGR 3560 - Mechanics of Materials
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ENGR 1210, ENGR 2110, and MATH 1920. Plane stress, plane strain, and stress-strain laws. Application of stress and deformation analysis to members subjected to centric, torsional, flexural, and combined loading. Introduces theories of failure, buckling, and energy methods.

ENGR 3570 - Machine Design
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ENGR 2100, ENGR 2120, and ENGR 3560. Analytical design methods. Stress analysis, working stress, combined stresses, failure theories, fatigue failure. Design techniques for shafts, fasteners, gears, bearings, and belt and chain drives. Includes a design project. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ENGR 3590 - Kinematics and Dynamics of Machinery
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ENGR 2120. The kinematics and dynamics of machinery and its applications to mechatronic systems. Analysis of motion translation/rotation in machinery, energy of machine mechanisms. Involves projects, seminars, and workshops regarding graphical, analytical, and numerical techniques for dynamic analysis and synthesis of machines. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ENGR 3915 - Technical Project Management and Soft Skills
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Project management as sanctioned by the International Project Management Institute and how to assess and boost emotional intelligence or soft skills. Student successfully completing course will earn 20 Professional Development Units (PDUs) issued by the International Project Management Institute.

NOTE: This was formerly ET 4915.

ENGR 3920 - Engineering Safety
3 credit hours

Safety and health in the manufacturing, construction, and utilities industries, including pertinent laws, codes, regulations, standards, and product liability considerations. Organizational and administrative principles and practices for safety management and safety engineering, accident investigation, safety education, and safety enforcement.

NOTE: This was formerly ET 4420 - Industrial Safety.

ENGR 3930 - Systems Engineering
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ENGR 2100, ENGR 3915, and ENGR 3970. An interdisciplinary course with both technical and management aspects of large, multifaceted engineering projects. Special emphasis placed on design, implementation, and improvement of mechatronic systems. Topics include systems engineering, engineering management, economics, quality control and engineering, project management, production systems planning and operations, and human factors.

ENGR 3970 - Engineering Economy
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Development of capital budgets. Justification of capital projects using time value of money concepts. Replacement analysis. Review of justification of actual capital projects and computer applications. Introduces economic risk assessment and Lean Six Sigma from an economic viewpoint.

NOTE: This was formerly ET 4970.

ENGR 4500 - FE Exam Preparation
1 credit hour credit

Prerequisite: Senior standing or completion of all 3000-level courses. Review of topics covered on the general session of the Fundamentals of Engineering exam. Covers all aspects of engineering curriculum including mathematics, engineering probability and statistics, chemistry, computers, ethics and business practices, engineering economics, engineering mechanics (statics and dynamics), strength of materials, material properties, fluid mechanics, electricity and magnetism, and thermodynamics.

ENGR 4501 - Topics in Mechatronics Engineering
1 to 3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Permission of department. Introduces new topics in various areas of advancement in engineering as related to mechatronics, automation, and robotics. Content varies depending on topics addressed.

ENGR 4510 - Programmable Logic Controllers and Networks
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ENGR 3520 and ENGR 3530 . Introduces programmable logic controllers (PLCs). Emphasizes ladder diagrams and programming of PLC. Introduces network systems such as DeviceNet, ProfiNet, and ProfiBus. Emphasizes the integration of PLCs in automation systems. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.  

ENGR 4520 - Electrical Power and Machinery
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ENGR 3510. Single- and three-phase power circuit calculations with phasor diagrams and electromagnetic laws. Magnetic field and circuit analysis. Variable frequency drives. Electromechanical energy conversion and rotating machinery modeling and analysis. Construction, equivalent circuit, and performance analysis of three-phase transformers and DC, induction, and synchronous motors. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ENGR 4530 - Controls and Optimization
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ENGR 3520. Theories and applications of control systems, optimization of mechatronic systems, feedback controls, root-locus, digital controls, PID, frequency response, and pole positions. Introduces microcontrollers. Systems approach implemented. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ENGR 4580 - Mechatronic System Design
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ENGR 3550 and ENGR 3590. Presents specifics in the mechanical design of mechatronic systems. Includes problem analysis, conceptualization, design/material selection, and performance analysis. Addresses mechanical subsystems, bill of materials, and economic analysis of the system. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ENGR 4590 - Automation System Design
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Completion of all 3000-level courses and ENGR 4580. Corequisite: ENGR 4530. Capstone design project. Design and analysis of a complete mechatronic system using controllers, sensors, and actuators. Advance systems programming with current industrial network programs and GUIs. Implementation of project and process management principles as well as professional documentation and presentation. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

Engineering Technology

ET 2310 - Computer-Assisted Drafting and Design I
3 credit hours

Covers basic technical drawing/sketching and drafting concepts using personal computers, plotters, and appropriate CAD software. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.  

ET 2920 - Industrial Orientation Internship
1 to 3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Provides industrial exposure for students with little or no industrial work experience. Students will be placed in an acceptable company for introductory industrial experiences. Arrangement for this course must be made in advance. Students may take from one to three credit hours; may be repeated for up to a maximum of three credit hours. Pass/Fail.

ET 2930 - Cooperative Education Experience I
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Permission of department. Provides students with opportunity for on-the-job training in conjunction with on-campus academic experiences. Students will participate in professional growth seminars. Pass/Fail.

ET 2940 - Cooperative Education Experience II
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ET 2930; permission of department. Continuation of ET 2930. Pass/Fail.

ET 3210 - Machine Tool Technology
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ENGR 1210 or ET 1210. Metals, their sources, manufacture, and properties; basic metalworking hand tools, measurements; layout; drawing and safety. Exercises in the use of the basic machine tools in machine shop work. Lecture and laboratory. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ET 3260 - Manufacturing Processes and Materials
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ENGR 1210. An analysis of machines, tools, processes, and materials used in production.

ET 3360 - Computer-Assisted Drafting and Design II
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: CMT 3320 or ET 2310. Utilizes PC and CAD software to develop skills in the creation and analysis of mechanical solid models for design and production purposes. Includes the use of shading and rendering to enhance three-dimensional model display and the extraction of two-dimensional engineering drawings. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ET 3601 - Electrical Circuit Analysis I
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ENGR 1100. Corequisite: MATH 1910. Fundamentals of electrical circuits. Addresses basic circuit components and quantities. Emphasis on DC circuit calculations and theorems. Uses lab equipment to build and test DC circuits. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ET 3602 - Electrical Circuit Analysis II
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ET 3601 and MATH 1910. Addresses basic circuit components and quantities of AC circuits. Introduces three-phase circuits and transformers. Emphasis on AC circuit calculations and theorems. Uses lab equipment to build and test AC circuits. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ET 3610 - Introduction to Electricity and Electronics
4 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 1710 or MATH 1730. Orientation to direct current, alternating current, magnetism, filters, and semiconductor devices. Rectifier-filters and basic transistor amplifiers are also examined as representative electronic circuits. Use of meters, oscilloscopes, and other test instruments are stressed in the laboratory. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ET 3615 - Principles of Electricity
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 1710 or MATH 1730. An overview of basic electrical circuits and systems, direct current circuits, alternating current circuits, and electrical devices and control schemes. Electrical motors, relays, solenoids, transformers, and power supplies examined. National Electric Code also examined. For students enrolled in Construction Management or Concrete Industry Management. Laboratory exercises stress the use of test instruments and the construction of basic electrical circuits. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ET 3620 - Digital Circuits Fundamentals
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ET 3601 or permission of instructor. Provides thorough coverage of basic digital electronic circuits analysis and design. TTL and CMOS families examined. Number systems, mapping, and minimization techniques covered. Digital design using random logic and programmable logic devices (FPGAs and CPLDs). Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ET 3630 - Electronics
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. Introduction to analog electronics. Defines basic parameters and theory of operation of discrete semiconductor devices. Introduces fundamentals of electronic circuits analysis and design. Applications illustrate use and laboratory projects provide hands-on experience. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ET 3640 - Digital Circuits Design
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ET 3620; corequisite: ET 3630 or permission of instructor. In-depth study of sequential circuit analysis and design that includes sate machine design. Emphasis on the use of available development boards using both FPGAs and CPLDs and their respective CAD tools. PLDs programmed using latest relative CAD systems. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ET 3650 - Introduction to Microprocessors
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: CSCI 1170 and ET 3620. Covers architecture of microcontrollers and microprocessor-based systems and their related components. Machine language programming extensively used to solve problems and demonstrate the relationship of the microprocessor and its supporting peripherals. Basic microcomputer architecture also emphasized. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ET 3660 - Communication Electronics
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ET 3630 or permission of instructor. Theory of electronic circuits as applied to communication; special electronics circuits required in communications systems. Testing theory and procedures. Various methods of electronic communications. Testing and evaluation of electronic circuits. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ET 3670 - Computer-Assisted Printed Circuit Board Design
2 credit hours

Prerequisites: ET 3620 and ET 3630 or permission of instructor. Utilizes computer software to develop skills in creating schematic and printed circuit board artwork for use in printed circuit board production. Includes plotting, printing, and generating all necessary documents required for fabrication. One hour lecture and three hours laboratory.

ET 3810 - Engineering Thermodynamics
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ENGR 1100; PHYS 2010/PHYS 2011 or PHYS 2110/PHYS 2111; MATH 1910. Basic concepts of engineering thermodynamics, properties and thermodynamic states, work, heat, first law, second law, entropy, ideal gases, and analysis of conventional power and refrigeration systems.

ET 3860 - Strength of Materials
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ENGR 2110. The mechanics of materials emphasizing the analysis and design of statically determinate beams, columns, and structural members in torsion and application of the three moment equations to statically indeterminate beams.

ET 3910 - Introduction to Operations Management
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. A foundation course in manufacturing and service operations management. Problem-solving applications emphasized.

ET 3920 - Industrial Internship I
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Student is employed by an acceptable industry for industrial experience. Credit given for actual work with employer. Arrangement for this course must be made in advance. Pass/Fail.

ET 3930 - Industrial Internship II
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ET 3920. A continuation of Internship I. Same stipulations apply. Pass/Fail.

ET 3950 - Metrology
3 credit hours

Overview of methods and procedures of precision measuring and gauging as used in inspection and quality control by industry. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ET 3960 - Industrial Quality Technology
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. Covers breadth and some depth in quality technology. Explores history of quality, present techniques, and future predictions. Covers six-sigma methodology at the "greenbelt" level. Certification after industry project. Lecture.

ET 3970 - Cooperative Education Experience III
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ET 2940; permission of department. Continuation of ET 2940. Pass/Fail.

ET 3980 - Cooperative Education Experience IV
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ET 3970; permission of department. Continuation of ET 3970. Pass/Fail.

ET 4230 - Advanced Machine Tool Technology
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ET 3210. Taper turning, boring and thread chasing, and calculations of screw threads and other operations. Gear terminology and calculations; practice gear cutting on the milling machine; use of index head. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ET 4280 - Computer-Aided Manufacturing: Numerical Control (NC)
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ET 2310 and ET 3210 or consent of instructor. The role of NC in today's manufacturing environment; machines and machine control systems of a typical installation. Justifying NC equipment. Emphasis on writing and debugging programs for a three-axis milling machine and a two-axis turning machine utilizing both computer numerical control and computer-aided part programming. For those with little experience or seeking to broaden their knowledge. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ET 4330 - Advanced Computer-Aided Drafting
2 credit hours

Prerequisite: ET 3360 or permission of instructor. Topics include customizing menus, 3-D concepts and surface modeling, AutoLisp, rendering, and slide shows. Interactive computer drafting and design using advanced AutoCAD software and add-ons. Primarily for students who want to increase their capabilities using CAD. One hour lecture and three hours laboratory.

ET 4340 - Design of Machine Elements
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ET 3860. Analytical design methods. Stress analysis, working stress, combined stresses, failure theories, fatigue failure. Design techniques for shafts, fasteners, gears, bearings, and belt and chain drives. Includes a design project.

ET 4440 - Fire Safety
3 credit hours

Fundamental methods of fire protection, prevention, and suppression. Includes characteristics and behavior of fire, fire hazards of materials and buildings, codes and standards for fire prevention and protection, fire protection equipment and systems, and fire fighting forces and how they operate.

ET 4450 - Industrial Hygiene
3 credit hours

Corequisite: ENGR 3920 or permission of instructor. An introduction to industrial or occupational hygiene--that science and art devoted to the anticipation, recognition, evaluation, and control of those environmental factors or stresses, arising in or from the workplace, which may cause sickness, impaired health and well-being, or significant discomfort and inefficiency among workers or citizens of the community.

ET 4490 - Topics in Industrial Technology
1 to 6 credit hours

Subject topics offered as required to meet the needs of the class.

ET 4590 - Manufacturing Automation Systems
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Junior status or consent of instructor. Technical, human, and business aspects of modern automation system. Includes automation controls, levels of control and major components/subsystems, object-based software components, intelligent actuators and sensors, emerging trends, flexible manufacturing systems (FMS), computer integrated manufacturing (CIM), industrial systems and supply chain applications, organizational approaches, and automation justification.

ET 4600 - Programmable Logic Controllers
2 credit hours

Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. Introduction to programmable logic controllers (PLCs). Selection, operation, and troubleshooting. Ladder diagrams and programming of PLC emphasized. One hour lecture and three hours laboratory.

ET 4610 - Instrumentation and Controls
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ET 3620 and ET 3630. Devices and techniques used in the measurement of physical parameters. Consideration of accuracies and sources of error, identification of typical measurements, sensors and transducers, control stability and response. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ET 4630 - Local Area Networks
3 credit hours

Provides the necessary foundation experience to understand the design, implementation, and management strategies of local and wide area networks (LAN/WAN). Data Communication Standards and protocol, fundamentals included. Will include lecture, laboratory activities, and a LAN design requirement. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ET 4640 - Industrial Electricity
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. AC power theory and circuits for industrial applications, polyphase systems, power factor correction, and transformers. Theory, applications, and selection of motors and generators. Industrial motor control and power transmission. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ET 4660 - Microprocessor Interfacing
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ET 3640 and ET 3650 or permission of instructor. Emphasis on interfacing various analog and digital devices to a microcontroller/microprocessor-based system: memory expansion, A/D and D/A, display devices, keyboards and keypads, electromechanical devices, and sensors. PLDs (FPGAs/CPLDs) interfaced to facilitate rapid prototyping of digital system design. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ET 4670 - Microprocessor Design
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ET 3640 and ET 4660 or permission of instructor. Advanced microprocessor system design. Emphasis on the design of core CPUs and imbedded components using high-density FPGA/CPLD development boards. Industrial applications of microprocessor-based systems. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ET 4701 - Industrial Topics
1 to 6 credit hours

Problems in any one of a variety of areas to meet the needs of the class.

ET 4710 - Professional Development Seminar
1 credit hour credit

Prerequisite: Junior status. Orientation to industrial job opportunities, placement practices, interview techniques, and preparation of application materials (resume, cover letter, and portfolio if warranted). Guest lecturers, films, and student and faculty presentations arranged in seminar fashion. One-hour lecture weekly.

ET 4790 - Advanced Problems in Technology
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Completion of all courses in a given area or approval of instructor. For the advanced student who wishes to work on a designated problem in a specific area. Works on an individual problem or project independently under the guidance of an instructor.

ET 4800 - Senior Problems in Industrial Technology
3 credit hours
ET 4801 - Computer Engineering Technology
1 to 3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ET 4670; CSCI 3160. All required freshman-, sophomore-, and junior-level courses in all disciplines have to be completed before registering for this course. Engineering situations are solved by experimental means. Student must have experimental approach, gather data, interpret results, and prepare a formal technical written and oral report.

ET 4802 - Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology
1 to 3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ET 3650, ET 3860, ET 4610, and ET 4860. All required freshman-, sophomore-, and junior-level courses in all disciplines have to be completed before registering for this course. Engineering situations are solved by experimental means. Student must have experimental approach, gather data, interpret results, and prepare a formal technical written and oral report.

ET 4803 - Mechanical Engineering Technology
1 to 3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ET 3860, ET 4340, and ET 4815. All required freshman-, sophomore-, and junior-level courses in all disciplines have to be completed before registering for this course. Engineering situations are solved by experimental means. Student must have experimental approach, gather data, interpret results, and prepare a formal technical written and oral report.

ET 4815 - Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ET 3810 or permission of instructor. Design and operation of heat and mass transfer systems which produce the needed environments for manufacturing operations, industrial processes, and human comfort. Systems that use mechanical equipment such as pumps, blowers, fans, compressors, and heat exchanges found in fields such as air conditioning, low temperature metallurgy, food preservation, chemical processing, and industrial manufacturing covered. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ET 4830 - Vibration
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ENGR 2120 or ET 3840. Provides a broad-based background in vibration analysis and introduces present practices. Topics include free, damped, and forced vibrations with one degree of freedom; vibration isolation; free vibration with two degrees of freedom; and introduction to matrix formulation. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ET 4850 - Fluid Power
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ENGR 1100, ET 3810. Systems and the basic components that make up these systems, including hydraulic, pneumatic, and fluidic. Emphasis on understanding the language and graphic symbols associated with fluid power, the performance characteristics of system components, and problem solving. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ET 4860 - Robotics
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: MATH 1910; CSCI (3 hours). Fundamentals of robots. Types of robots, types of controls, the prime movers, the application of robots in the industrial environment, and problem solving. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

ET 4900 - Productivity Strategies
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Analysis, design, and implementation of productivity strategies and productivity improvement programs for a wide variety of organizations. Touches a spectrum of disciplines such as work design, quality, design engineering, and employee involvement. Includes lean manufacturing with certification available after successful industry project.

ET 4920 - Plant Layout and Materials Handling
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ET 2310 and ET 3910. An overview of facility planning including equipment selection, work flow analysis, activity relationship analysis, and plant layout for product, process, and JIT requirements. Teams assigned actual projects in industry. CAD layout presentations to industry management required.

ET 4990 - Industrial Engineering Systems
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. System design of work tasks including establishing time standards by time and motion study and work sampling; ergonomic design for integration of the human into the work task environment. Scientific methods supplemented by quality considerations with emphasis on statistical quality control (SQC). Computer software used for design and analysis.

Contact and Student Information

etdept@mtsu.edu
615-898-2776

Susanna Wassom (A-J)
Susanna.Wassom@mtsu.edu
615-898-2672 | KUC 322

Danielle Stefanski (K-Z)
Danielle.Stefanski@mtsu.edu
615-898-2268 | KUC 322

Department of Engineering Technology
Middle Tennessee State University
MTSU Box 19
1301 East Main Street
Murfreesboro, TN 37132

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