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  • A low student-teacher ratio at MTSU assures one-on-one learning
  • Professor Warner Cribb explains the structure of the Valles Caldera
    in New Mexico
    during a field trip
  • MTSU students learn from experiences outside the classroom
  • Geology students are on the crater rim of Mt. St. Helens volcano

Geoscience

Geosciences prepares students to excel in earth-related careers in public service, the private sector, and education. Job demand is high with the prevalence of long-term issues like changing energy supplies, dwindling natural resources, climate change, and natural disasters. MTSU has one of the Southeast's largest undergraduate programs, but a student-faculty ratio of 10 to 1 allows personal attention. Concentrations in geology and physical geography are offered, and a master’s program is available.

GIS lab, faculty offer undergrads research opportunities

Jeremy Aber is among MTSU faculty working with Geosciences majors to utilize the university’s geographic information system (GIS) lab. Through a research grant, Aber is involved in a Board of Regents partnership with Austin Peay to conduct geosciences research with the help of undergraduates.  Among his planned projects, Aber has a blimp and kites to take aerial photography using a digital infrared camera to monitor vegetation around Murfreesboro’s public greenway located next to Stones River. Other research includes an augmented reality app to expose hidden geographies and using geotagged Tweets to map various phenomena. His geosciences research taps into the variety of available technology—from lab resources to cell phones, GPS, Twitter, and even videogames. MTSU’s GIS lab is comparable to major research institutions with equipment, technology and software for all kinds of projects, Aber says. Named in honor of retired department chair Ralph Fullerton, the lab has projects ranging from historical to remote sensing to satellite imaging. Space will be expanded with a move by 2016 to the under-renovation Davis Science Building.

Geosciences majors learn through field experiences

Field trips are an essential part of the learning process in the Department of Geosciences. Faculty regularly lead students on weekend field trips throughout the southeastern United States. During these trips, students study the geologic history of their field areas and learn important field skills such as geoscience data collection and interpretation, synthesizing geological histories, report writing, and geologic mapping. In addition to weekend field trips, the department offers extended summer field courses in Colorado, the Appalachian Mountains, and the Pacific Northwest. Field trips are a favorite part of the Geoscience undergraduate experience, allowing opportunities for students to build life-long friendships in scenic and spectacular settings. During most field trips, "home" is a campground from which students embark on daily excursions on which they apply classroom-learned concepts to the "real world." Many students turn their field-trip experiences into faculty-directed research projects, leading to student-authored research publications and conference presentations.

The global demand for geoscientists in areas such as mining, oil and gas exploration, environmental science, and the rapidly expanding field of geographic information systems (GIS) far exceeds the current supply.

Graduates also go on to earn master's and doctoral degrees at some of the nation's most prestigious research universities or work in geoscience-related professions such as park service, science journalism, and science education.

Employers of MTSU alumni include

  • ARCADIS
  • Arnold Air Force Base
  • ATC Associates
  • Bauer Foundation Corp.
  • Chesapeake Energy
  • Doe Run Mining
  • Middle schools and high schools
  • Murfreesboro Planning Department
  • Notre Dame University
  • Nyrstar Mining
  • Rutherford County Planning Commission
  • Signal Hill Petroleum
  • Smyrna Planning Department
  • Southwestern Energy
  • St. John Engineering
  • Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation
  • Tennessee Department of Transportation
  • Tennessee State Parks
  • Texas Christian University
  • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
  • University of Memphis
  • University of Oklahoma
  • Vanderbilt University
  • Wiser Co.

The MTSU Department of Geosciences offers a Bachelor of Science degree in Geoscience, with concentrations in Geology and Physical Geography.

  • Geology students choose from three career tracks: Geology, Earth Science, and Earth Science Education.
  • Physical Geography students choose between two career tracks: Physical Geography and Geographic Techniques.
  • Minors are offered in Geology/Earth Science, Physical Geography, and Remote Sensing (see requirements below).

The department also offers a Master of Science with a major in Professional Science and a concentration in Geoscience, often called a Professional Science Master’s degree. Students in this program choose among three tracks: Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Environmental Geosystems, and General Geoscience. All graduate students are required to complete a pre-professional internship.

Requirements for minors

Geology/Earth Science

Required Courses (8 hours)

Electives (10-14 hours)

  •  10-14 hours at the 3000 level or above

Physical Geography

The minor in Physical Geography requires 18 hours (all in courses with a PGEO designation) to be selected by the student and approved by a member of the faculty assigned as advisor. The minor will be specific enough to support the student’s career plans.

Remote Sensing

Required Courses (18 hours)

Physical Geography Geographic Techniques Earth Science for Teachers Earth Science Geology Career 


Geoscience, Physical Geography Concentration (Physical Geography), B.S.

Department of Geosciences 
616-904-8372
Henrique Momm, program coordinator
Henrique.Momm@mtsu.edu

This program is designed for students who plan to become professional geographers or who wish to pursue graduate study in geography and/or related fields. This career pattern requires a minimum of 42 hours of departmental core requirements, one 18-hour cognate in math/science/engineering,19 hours of general electives, and General Education requirements.

Required Courses (42 hours)

  • GEOL 1030 - Introduction to Earth Science

    3 credit hours

    Corequisite: GEOL 1031. The earth and its relationship to its space and environment emphasized. Forces and processes which combine to mold the face of the earth and its atmosphere, as well as the internal constitution of the earth. Three hours lecture. Together, GEOL 1030 and GEOL 1031 satisfy 4 hours of the Natural Sciences portion of the General Education requirement.

OR

  • GEOL 1040 - Physical Geology  4 credit hours  AND

    GEOL 1040 - Physical Geology

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: GEOL 1041. The origin, composition, and structure of the solid earth: rock-forming minerals; igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks; earthquakes and plate tectonics; surface processes; geologic time. Identification and description of minerals and rocks in hand sample. Use of topographic and geologic maps. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • GEOL 3010 - Oceanography  3 credit hours  

    GEOL 3010 - Oceanography

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041 or PGEO 1030. Physiography, structures, and sediments of the ocean floor; coastal and oceanic environments; and the nature of sea water, currents, waves, and tides. Geological processes, geophysical studies, and oceanographic instrumentation discussed.

  • GEOL 4020 - Geomorphic Regions of the United States

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041. Origin, regional distribution, and geomorphic features and history of landforms of the United States. Students will be required to analyze maps, structure sections, and aerial photography to determine geomorphic forms and the forces and processes that produced these forms. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • GEOL 4050 - Meteorology  3 credit hours  

    GEOL 4050 - Meteorology

    3 credit hours

    A general, non-mathematical introduction to the atmosphere. Emphasis on main elements such as temperature, precipitation, clouds, and humidity. In-depth analysis of storms, tornadoes, and hurricanes and human alteration of the atmosphere such as the ozone hole. Weather forecasting and climate change.

  • PGEO 1030 - Physical Geography

    4 credit hours

    The physical earth as the home of humans. The global earth in space, tools of the discipline, the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, and the biosphere. Field trips may be required. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • PGEO 3401 - Field Studies in Physical Geography

    4 credit hours

    Supervised study in some geographical area, preceded by classroom preview and concluded by a time of evaluation. Emphasis on natural and cultural elements of the environment with special attention directed toward the pattern of human occupancy. For fees and specific credit, consult the instructor.

  • PGEO 4000 - Climatology and Climate Change

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PGEO 1030 or GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041. Non-mathematical introduction to the causes and patterns of global climates and in-depth analysis of climate change, including paleoclimatology and recent global cooling and warming trends, their natural and human-induced causes, potential future trends, human and environmental adaptation, and mitigation including geoengineering.

  • PGEO 4010 - Biogeography  3 credit hours  

    PGEO 4010 - Biogeography

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites:PGEO 1030 or GEOL 1030/ GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040 GEOL 1041. Examines the science of biogeography, geographic principles, and foundations of biogeography. Topics include patterns of biodiversity, ecological biogeography, specialization and extinction forces, and the frontiers of biogeography.

  • PGEO 4020 - Environmental Issues, Impacts, and Sustainability

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PGEO 1030 or GEOL 1030 GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040 GEOL 1041. Examines the geographic aspects of how locations affect such modern issues of air and water pollution, hazardous waste, climate change, and food production. Provides an overview of the modern environmental concerns, their causes, consequences, and factors needing to be examined in order to gain an understanding of these problems.

  • PGEO 4380 - Cartography  4 credit hours  

    PGEO 4380 - Cartography

    4 credit hours

    General knowledge of the field including familiarity with the techniques and tools of professional cartography and graphics. Selected lectures, class discussions, and a series of map construction assignments. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • PGEO 4490 - Remote Sensing  4 credit hours  

    PGEO 4490 - Remote Sensing

    4 credit hours

    The various aspects of remote sensing such as radar, satellite imagery, and infrared data. Use of data in preparation of maps and application to land use and environmental problems examined. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • PGEO 4530 - Geographic Information Systems

    3 credit hours

    Lecture and laboratory work relative to computer-manipulated geographic data base. Laboratory work will involve experience in practical application of a geographic information system (GIS) to problem solving.

Cognate

General Electives

  • 19 credit hours, advisor-approved

Curriculum: Geoscience, Physical Geography Concentration (Physical Geography)

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

Following is a suggested pattern of study for the first two years; however, consultation with the assigned advisor is necessary before registration.

Freshman

 

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • PGEO 1030 - Physical Geography

    4 credit hours

    The physical earth as the home of humans. The global earth in space, tools of the discipline, the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, and the biosphere. Field trips may be required. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • GEOL 4050 - Meteorology  3 credit hours  

    GEOL 4050 - Meteorology

    3 credit hours

    A general, non-mathematical introduction to the atmosphere. Emphasis on main elements such as temperature, precipitation, clouds, and humidity. In-depth analysis of storms, tornadoes, and hurricanes and human alteration of the atmosphere such as the ozone hole. Weather forecasting and climate change.

  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours
  • Natural Sciences 4 credit hours
  • Mathematics (Math) 3 credit hours

 

  • GEOL 1030 - Introduction to Earth Science

    3 credit hours

    Corequisite: GEOL 1031. The earth and its relationship to its space and environment emphasized. Forces and processes which combine to mold the face of the earth and its atmosphere, as well as the internal constitution of the earth. Three hours lecture. Together, GEOL 1030 and GEOL 1031 satisfy 4 hours of the Natural Sciences portion of the General Education requirement.

OR

  • GEOL 1040 - Physical Geology  4 credit hours  AND

    GEOL 1040 - Physical Geology

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: GEOL 1041. The origin, composition, and structure of the solid earth: rock-forming minerals; igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks; earthquakes and plate tectonics; surface processes; geologic time. Identification and description of minerals and rocks in hand sample. Use of topographic and geologic maps. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Sophomore

 

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

 

  • GEOL 4020 - Geomorphic Regions of the United States

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041. Origin, regional distribution, and geomorphic features and history of landforms of the United States. Students will be required to analyze maps, structure sections, and aerial photography to determine geomorphic forms and the forces and processes that produced these forms. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • PGEO 4380 - Cartography  4 credit hours  

    PGEO 4380 - Cartography

    4 credit hours

    General knowledge of the field including familiarity with the techniques and tools of professional cartography and graphics. Selected lectures, class discussions, and a series of map construction assignments. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • PGEO 4530 - Geographic Information Systems

    3 credit hours

    Lecture and laboratory work relative to computer-manipulated geographic data base. Laboratory work will involve experience in practical application of a geographic information system (GIS) to problem solving.

  • PGEO 4490 - Remote Sensing  4 credit hours  

    PGEO 4490 - Remote Sensing

    4 credit hours

    The various aspects of remote sensing such as radar, satellite imagery, and infrared data. Use of data in preparation of maps and application to land use and environmental problems examined. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • Cognate(s) 6 credit hours
  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours

 

Choose 6 hours from:

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 33 Hours

Junior

 

Subtotal: 31 Hours

 

Senior

 

Subtotal: 26 Hours

Total hours in program: 120

 

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Geoscience, Physical Geography (Physical Geography Career Pattern), B.S. Academic Map  


Geoscience, Physical Geography Concentration (Geographic Techniques), B.S.

Department of Geosciences 
615-904-8372
Henrique Momm, program coordinator
Henrique.Momm@mtsu.edu

This program is designed for students who plan to become professional geographers or who wish to pursue graduate study in physical geography and/or related fields. This career pattern requires a minimum of 42 hours of departmental core requirements, a math/science cognate (18 hours), and 19 hours of advisor-approved electives (selected in consultation with and approved by the major academic advisor), and General Education requirements.

Required Courses (42 hours)

  • PGEO 1030 - Physical Geography

    4 credit hours

    The physical earth as the home of humans. The global earth in space, tools of the discipline, the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, and the biosphere. Field trips may be required. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • GEOL 4050 - Meteorology  3 credit hours  

    GEOL 4050 - Meteorology

    3 credit hours

    A general, non-mathematical introduction to the atmosphere. Emphasis on main elements such as temperature, precipitation, clouds, and humidity. In-depth analysis of storms, tornadoes, and hurricanes and human alteration of the atmosphere such as the ozone hole. Weather forecasting and climate change.

  • PGEO 3401 - Field Studies in Physical Geography

    4 credit hours

    Supervised study in some geographical area, preceded by classroom preview and concluded by a time of evaluation. Emphasis on natural and cultural elements of the environment with special attention directed toward the pattern of human occupancy. For fees and specific credit, consult the instructor.

  • PGEO 4380 - Cartography  4 credit hours  

    PGEO 4380 - Cartography

    4 credit hours

    General knowledge of the field including familiarity with the techniques and tools of professional cartography and graphics. Selected lectures, class discussions, and a series of map construction assignments. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • PGEO 4490 - Remote Sensing  4 credit hours  

    PGEO 4490 - Remote Sensing

    4 credit hours

    The various aspects of remote sensing such as radar, satellite imagery, and infrared data. Use of data in preparation of maps and application to land use and environmental problems examined. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • PGEO 4530 - Geographic Information Systems

    3 credit hours

    Lecture and laboratory work relative to computer-manipulated geographic data base. Laboratory work will involve experience in practical application of a geographic information system (GIS) to problem solving.

  • PGEO 4560 - Intermediate Geographic Information Systems

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PGEO 4530. Lecture and laboratory work related to the principles and applications of geographic information (GIS). Continued training in GIS analysis including raster analysis, spatial analysis, network analysis, and geocoding. Examines data management including data editing and geodatabase design and creation. Other topics include resource management, demographic, and civic applications.

  • GEOL 4020 - Geomorphic Regions of the United States

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041. Origin, regional distribution, and geomorphic features and history of landforms of the United States. Students will be required to analyze maps, structure sections, and aerial photography to determine geomorphic forms and the forces and processes that produced these forms. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

 

  • GEOL 1030 - Introduction to Earth Science

    3 credit hours

    Corequisite: GEOL 1031. The earth and its relationship to its space and environment emphasized. Forces and processes which combine to mold the face of the earth and its atmosphere, as well as the internal constitution of the earth. Three hours lecture. Together, GEOL 1030 and GEOL 1031 satisfy 4 hours of the Natural Sciences portion of the General Education requirement.

OR

  • GEOL 1040 - Physical Geology  4 credit hours  AND

    GEOL 1040 - Physical Geology

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: GEOL 1041. The origin, composition, and structure of the solid earth: rock-forming minerals; igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks; earthquakes and plate tectonics; surface processes; geologic time. Identification and description of minerals and rocks in hand sample. Use of topographic and geologic maps. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

Departmental Electives (9 hours)

  • PGEO or GEOL electives 9 credit hours 

Cognate

  • MATH 1530 (Statistics) plus 15 hours of advisor-approved College of Basic and Applied Sciences coursework

General Electives

  • 19 hours, advisor-approved

Curriculum: Geoscience, Geography Concentration (Geographic Techniques)

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

Following is a suggested pattern of study for the first two years; however, consultation with the assigned advisor is necessary before registration.

Freshman

 

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • PGEO 1030 - Physical Geography

    4 credit hours

    The physical earth as the home of humans. The global earth in space, tools of the discipline, the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, and the biosphere. Field trips may be required. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • GEOL 4050 - Meteorology  3 credit hours  

    GEOL 4050 - Meteorology

    3 credit hours

    A general, non-mathematical introduction to the atmosphere. Emphasis on main elements such as temperature, precipitation, clouds, and humidity. In-depth analysis of storms, tornadoes, and hurricanes and human alteration of the atmosphere such as the ozone hole. Weather forecasting and climate change.

  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours
  • Mathematics 3 credit hours
  • Natural Sciences 4 credit hours

 

  • GEOG 2000 - Introduction to Regional Geography

    3 credit hours

    Required for all Global Studies and Cultural Geography majors and Cultural Geography minors. Examines world regions using the geographical perspective, identifying the main physical and cultural features, especially through the use of maps.

 

  • GEOL 1030 - Introduction to Earth Science

    3 credit hours

    Corequisite: GEOL 1031. The earth and its relationship to its space and environment emphasized. Forces and processes which combine to mold the face of the earth and its atmosphere, as well as the internal constitution of the earth. Three hours lecture. Together, GEOL 1030 and GEOL 1031 satisfy 4 hours of the Natural Sciences portion of the General Education requirement.

OR

  • GEOL 1040 - Physical Geology  4 credit hours  AND

    GEOL 1040 - Physical Geology

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: GEOL 1041. The origin, composition, and structure of the solid earth: rock-forming minerals; igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks; earthquakes and plate tectonics; surface processes; geologic time. Identification and description of minerals and rocks in hand sample. Use of topographic and geologic maps. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Sophomore

 

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

 

  • PGEO 4380 - Cartography  4 credit hours  

    PGEO 4380 - Cartography

    4 credit hours

    General knowledge of the field including familiarity with the techniques and tools of professional cartography and graphics. Selected lectures, class discussions, and a series of map construction assignments. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • PGEO 4490 - Remote Sensing  4 credit hours  

    PGEO 4490 - Remote Sensing

    4 credit hours

    The various aspects of remote sensing such as radar, satellite imagery, and infrared data. Use of data in preparation of maps and application to land use and environmental problems examined. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • PGEO 4530 - Geographic Information Systems

    3 credit hours

    Lecture and laboratory work relative to computer-manipulated geographic data base. Laboratory work will involve experience in practical application of a geographic information system (GIS) to problem solving.

  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours
  • Natural Sciences 4 credit hours
  • Minor 6 credit hours

 

Choose 6 hours from:

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 33 Hours

 

Junior

 

Subtotal: 32 Hours

 

Senior

 

Subtotal: 25 Hours

 

Total hours in program: 120

 

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Geoscience, Physical Geography (Geographic Techniques), B.S. Academic Map  


Geoscience, Geology Concentration (Earth Science for Teachers), B.S.

Department of Geosciences 
615-904-8019
Clay Harris, program coordinator
Clay.Harris@mtsu.edu

The Earth Science for Teachers curriculum is designed for those who plan to teach earth science in the secondary school system. This curriculum consists of 82 hours distributed among career pattern requirements (22 hours), career pattern electives (10 hours), a cognate (20 hours), and a minor in Secondary Education(30 hours) involving education courses and directed teaching. An additional 41 hours are required for General Education. Student must contact Secondary Education minor advisor for approval of appropriate courses for licensure. For specific procedures and additional requirements for teacher licensure, see College of Education.

NOTE: Please see Secondary Education Minor for requirements and additional information.

Required Courses (22 hours)

 

  • GEOL 1050 - Historical Geology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1030 and GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041. The major divisions of geologic time with emphasis on earth movements, sea fluctuations, life of the time, and the effect these have had on our present environment. Close attention to the development of the physiographic regions of North America, which are correlated with chronologically similar events in other parts of the world. Topographic maps, geologic maps, and fossil animals and plants. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

 

  • GEOL 1030 - Introduction to Earth Science

    3 credit hours

    Corequisite: GEOL 1031. The earth and its relationship to its space and environment emphasized. Forces and processes which combine to mold the face of the earth and its atmosphere, as well as the internal constitution of the earth. Three hours lecture. Together, GEOL 1030 and GEOL 1031 satisfy 4 hours of the Natural Sciences portion of the General Education requirement.

OR

  • GEOL 1040 - Physical Geology  4 credit hours  AND

    GEOL 1040 - Physical Geology

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: GEOL 1041. The origin, composition, and structure of the solid earth: rock-forming minerals; igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks; earthquakes and plate tectonics; surface processes; geologic time. Identification and description of minerals and rocks in hand sample. Use of topographic and geologic maps. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • GEOL 3010 - Oceanography  3 credit hours  

    GEOL 3010 - Oceanography

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041 or PGEO 1030. Physiography, structures, and sediments of the ocean floor; coastal and oceanic environments; and the nature of sea water, currents, waves, and tides. Geological processes, geophysical studies, and oceanographic instrumentation discussed.

  • GEOL 4020 - Geomorphic Regions of the United States

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041. Origin, regional distribution, and geomorphic features and history of landforms of the United States. Students will be required to analyze maps, structure sections, and aerial photography to determine geomorphic forms and the forces and processes that produced these forms. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • GEOL 4050 - Meteorology  3 credit hours  

    GEOL 4050 - Meteorology

    3 credit hours

    A general, non-mathematical introduction to the atmosphere. Emphasis on main elements such as temperature, precipitation, clouds, and humidity. In-depth analysis of storms, tornadoes, and hurricanes and human alteration of the atmosphere such as the ozone hole. Weather forecasting and climate change.

  • PGEO 1030 - Physical Geography

    4 credit hours

    The physical earth as the home of humans. The global earth in space, tools of the discipline, the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, and the biosphere. Field trips may be required. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

NOTE: Geology concentration requires grade of B- or above in GEOL 1030/1031 or GEOL 1040/1041.

NOTE:

Geology concentration requires grade of B- or above in GEOL 1030/1031 or GEOL 1040/1041.

Electives (10 hours)

 Choose 10 hours of Geoscience electives from any GEOL course, any advisor-approved math or science course.

Math/Science Cognate (20 hours)

 

  • ASTR 1030 - Exploring the Universe

    3 credit hours

    A general introduction to astronomy through an overview of planets, stars, systems of stars, and the overall structure of the universe. Topics will be discussed by answering questions such as "How do you weigh stars?" and "Will the universe die?"

  • ASTR 1031 - Observing the Universe  1 credit hour credit hours  

    ASTR 1031 - Observing the Universe

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite or corequisite: ASTR 1030. Introduction to observational astronomy through laboratory exercises and outdoor observing activities. Topics include telescopes, the analysis of starlight, and observations of stars and planets.

 

  • BIOL 1110 - General Biology  4 credit hours  *

    BIOL 1110 - General Biology

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: BIOL 1111. Primarily for Biology majors and minors and other science-oriented students. Biological principles and processes, including introduction to the nature of science, cells (structure, function, metabolism, division), genetics, evolution, viruses, bacteria, protists, and fungi. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory. While BIOL 1110 can be used to fulfill half the 8-hour General Education requirement for Natural Sciences, it is the first semester of a two-semester sequence primarily designed for science majors.

  • BIOL 1120 - General Biology  4 credit hours  AND

    BIOL 1120 - General Biology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111. Corequisite: BIOL 1121. Primarily for Biology majors and minors and other science-oriented students. Survey of plants and animals emphasizing evolution, structure, function, reproduction, growth, and ecology. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • CHEM 1010 - Introductory General Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: CHEM 1011. For students with no prior courses in chemistry; to be taken before CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Fundamental concepts of chemistry: measurements, matter, chemical bonds, chemical reactions, nuclear chemistry, states of matter, solutions, and electrolytes. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory. Will not count toward a major or minor in Chemistry.

OR

  • CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: High school chemistry. Corequisite: CHEM 1111. Fundamental concepts of atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometric relationships, periodic properties of the elements, thermochemistry, and properties of gases. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • CHEM 1020 - Introductory General Chemistry II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1010/CHEM 1011. Corequisite: CHEM 1021 Topics include hydrocarbons, organic functional groups, isomerism, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids and proteins, enzymes, and metabolism. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory. Will not count toward a major or minor in Chemistry.

OR

  • CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II  4 credit hours  AND

    CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Corequisite: CHEM 1121. Chemical equilibrium, solid and liquid states of matter, chemistry of acids and bases, principles of chemical kinetics, precipitation reactions, elementary thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2011. Web-based discussion class to be taken in conjunction with cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2011. Classical mechanics traditionally covered in a first-semester college physics course. Kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Class time used for discussion of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2010. Group-oriented problems course taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2010. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2010 discussion class. Covers kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

 

  • PHYS 2020 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics II

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2021. Web-based discussion class taken in conjunction with the cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2021. Fundamentals of optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. Scheduled class time is used for discussions of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2021 - Physics Problems Laboratory II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2020. Group-oriented problems course to be taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2020. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2020 discussion class. Optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. The skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

 

  • MATH 1720 - Plane Trigonometry

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Strong background in algebra recommended. Trigonometric functions of the acute and general angle, circular functions, graphs of trigonometric and inverse functions, identities, solutions of right and general triangles, equations, complex numbers, and vectors. Not open to those who have had MATH 1730. Graphing calculator required.

NOTE:

* Counted in General Education requirements

Minor in Secondary Education (30 hours)

 

  • YOED 2500 - Planning and Assessment

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Completion of 45 semester hours and admission to Teacher Education. Offers preparation for planning instruction, assessing student learning, and understanding how classroom assessment and standardized testing should impact instruction. Introduces education policy, professionalism, and theory which informs students as they enter and practice the profession. Field experience required.

  • YOED 3000 - Classroom Management

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: YOED 2500 with grade of B or better and admission to Teacher Education. Introduces a variety of classroom management strategies and techniques that will foster a positive learning environment in the classrooms. Provides an overview of behavior management models, theories, and research as a foundation for classroom practice. Facilitates, through the use of field experiences, the analysis of school-wide policies/procedures and insight on real life classroom management expectations of the first-year teacher.

  • YOED 3300 - Problem-Based Instructional Strategies

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: YOED 2500 with grade of B or better and admission to Teacher Education. Offers preparation for students to develop and present instructional strategies that frame curriculum content in problem-solving contexts. Field experience in a public school setting required.

  • YOED 4030 - Residency I: Grades 7-12

    9 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education program; successful completion of YOED 2500, YOED 3000, YOED 3300 with a grade of B or better; overall grade point average maintained at a minimum of 2.75; grade point average in the major at a minimum of 2.5; and senior standing. A school-based clinical experience in a problem-based learning format.

    NOTE: All students must obtain a grade of B or better in this course to move forward to Residency II.

  • YOED 4400 - Residency II  12 credit hours  

    YOED 4400 - Residency II

    12 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education program; successful completion (with grade of B or better) of YOED 2500, YOED 3000, YOED 3300, YOED 4020,YOED 4030, or YOED 4040; passing score(s) on the specialty area exam(s) of Praxis II; overall grade point average maintained at a minimum of 2.75; grade point average in the major at a minimum of 2.50; and senior standing. A full-day, full-semester supervised teaching experience in a public school classroom. Pass/Fail grading.

Curriculum: Geoscience, Geology Concentration (Earth Science for Teachers)

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

Following is a suggested pattern of study for the first two years; however, consultation with the assigned advisor is necessary before registration.

Freshman

 

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • Social/Behavioral Sciences, 6 credit hours
  • MATH 1720 - Plane Trigonometry  3 credit hours  (Math)

    MATH 1720 - Plane Trigonometry

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Strong background in algebra recommended. Trigonometric functions of the acute and general angle, circular functions, graphs of trigonometric and inverse functions, identities, solutions of right and general triangles, equations, complex numbers, and vectors. Not open to those who have had MATH 1730. Graphing calculator required.

  • GEOL 1050 - Historical Geology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1030 and GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041. The major divisions of geologic time with emphasis on earth movements, sea fluctuations, life of the time, and the effect these have had on our present environment. Close attention to the development of the physiographic regions of North America, which are correlated with chronologically similar events in other parts of the world. Topographic maps, geologic maps, and fossil animals and plants. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • PGEO 1030 - Physical Geography

    4 credit hours

    The physical earth as the home of humans. The global earth in space, tools of the discipline, the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, and the biosphere. Field trips may be required. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • GEOL 1030 - Introduction to Earth Science

    3 credit hours

    Corequisite: GEOL 1031. The earth and its relationship to its space and environment emphasized. Forces and processes which combine to mold the face of the earth and its atmosphere, as well as the internal constitution of the earth. Three hours lecture. Together, GEOL 1030 and GEOL 1031 satisfy 4 hours of the Natural Sciences portion of the General Education requirement.

OR

  • GEOL 1040 - Physical Geology  4 credit hours  AND

    GEOL 1040 - Physical Geology

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: GEOL 1041. The origin, composition, and structure of the solid earth: rock-forming minerals; igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks; earthquakes and plate tectonics; surface processes; geologic time. Identification and description of minerals and rocks in hand sample. Use of topographic and geologic maps. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

 

Choose 6 hours from:

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 33 Hours

 

Sophomore

 

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

 

  • BIOL 1110 - General Biology  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci) AND

    BIOL 1110 - General Biology

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: BIOL 1111. Primarily for Biology majors and minors and other science-oriented students. Biological principles and processes, including introduction to the nature of science, cells (structure, function, metabolism, division), genetics, evolution, viruses, bacteria, protists, and fungi. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory. While BIOL 1110 can be used to fulfill half the 8-hour General Education requirement for Natural Sciences, it is the first semester of a two-semester sequence primarily designed for science majors.

 

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • GEOL 3010 - Oceanography  3 credit hours  

    GEOL 3010 - Oceanography

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041 or PGEO 1030. Physiography, structures, and sediments of the ocean floor; coastal and oceanic environments; and the nature of sea water, currents, waves, and tides. Geological processes, geophysical studies, and oceanographic instrumentation discussed.

  • GEOL 4020 - Geomorphic Regions of the United States

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041. Origin, regional distribution, and geomorphic features and history of landforms of the United States. Students will be required to analyze maps, structure sections, and aerial photography to determine geomorphic forms and the forces and processes that produced these forms. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • GEOL 4050 - Meteorology  3 credit hours  

    GEOL 4050 - Meteorology

    3 credit hours

    A general, non-mathematical introduction to the atmosphere. Emphasis on main elements such as temperature, precipitation, clouds, and humidity. In-depth analysis of storms, tornadoes, and hurricanes and human alteration of the atmosphere such as the ozone hole. Weather forecasting and climate change.

  • YOED 2500 - Planning and Assessment

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Completion of 45 semester hours and admission to Teacher Education. Offers preparation for planning instruction, assessing student learning, and understanding how classroom assessment and standardized testing should impact instruction. Introduces education policy, professionalism, and theory which informs students as they enter and practice the profession. Field experience required.

  • CHEM 1010 - Introductory General Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: CHEM 1011. For students with no prior courses in chemistry; to be taken before CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Fundamental concepts of chemistry: measurements, matter, chemical bonds, chemical reactions, nuclear chemistry, states of matter, solutions, and electrolytes. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory. Will not count toward a major or minor in Chemistry.

OR

  • CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I  4 credit hours  AND

    CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: High school chemistry. Corequisite: CHEM 1111. Fundamental concepts of atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometric relationships, periodic properties of the elements, thermochemistry, and properties of gases. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • CHEM 1020 - Introductory General Chemistry II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1010/CHEM 1011. Corequisite: CHEM 1021 Topics include hydrocarbons, organic functional groups, isomerism, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids and proteins, enzymes, and metabolism. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory. Will not count toward a major or minor in Chemistry.

OR

  • CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II  4 credit hours  AND

    CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Corequisite: CHEM 1121. Chemical equilibrium, solid and liquid states of matter, chemistry of acids and bases, principles of chemical kinetics, precipitation reactions, elementary thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

Subtotal: 31 Hours

 

Junior

 

Subtotal: 34 Hours

Senior

 

Subtotal: 25 Hours

 

Total hours in program: 123

 

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Geoscience, Geology (Earth Science for Teachers), B.S., Academic Map  

 


Geoscience, Geology Concentration (Earth Science), B.S.

Department of Geosciences 
615-904-8019
Clay Harris, program coordinator
Clay.Harris@mtsu.edu

This Earth Science career pattern is designed for students who plan to become professional earth scientists or who wish to pursue graduate study in earth science. The Earth Science career pattern consists of 79 hours distributed among career pattern requirements, a math/science cognate, and electives chosen in consultation with a Geosciences mentor. General Education requirements complete the 120-hour requirement.

Required Courses (42 hours)

 

  • GEOL 1030 - Introduction to Earth Science

    3 credit hours

    Corequisite: GEOL 1031. The earth and its relationship to its space and environment emphasized. Forces and processes which combine to mold the face of the earth and its atmosphere, as well as the internal constitution of the earth. Three hours lecture. Together, GEOL 1030 and GEOL 1031 satisfy 4 hours of the Natural Sciences portion of the General Education requirement.

OR

  • GEOL 1040 - Physical Geology  4 credit hours  AND

    GEOL 1040 - Physical Geology

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: GEOL 1041. The origin, composition, and structure of the solid earth: rock-forming minerals; igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks; earthquakes and plate tectonics; surface processes; geologic time. Identification and description of minerals and rocks in hand sample. Use of topographic and geologic maps. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

 

  • GEOL 1050 - Historical Geology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1030 and GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041. The major divisions of geologic time with emphasis on earth movements, sea fluctuations, life of the time, and the effect these have had on our present environment. Close attention to the development of the physiographic regions of North America, which are correlated with chronologically similar events in other parts of the world. Topographic maps, geologic maps, and fossil animals and plants. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • GEOL 3000 - Mineralogy  5 credit hours  

    GEOL 3000 - Mineralogy

    5 credit hours

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041 or permission of instructor. Crystallography and crystal chemistry. Physical and chemical properties of silicate and non-silicate mineral groups. Examination of the common rock-forming minerals in hand sample and thin section. Four hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • GEOL 3010 - Oceanography  3 credit hours  

    GEOL 3010 - Oceanography

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041 or PGEO 1030. Physiography, structures, and sediments of the ocean floor; coastal and oceanic environments; and the nature of sea water, currents, waves, and tides. Geological processes, geophysical studies, and oceanographic instrumentation discussed.

  • GEOL 3050 - Field Methods in Geology

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: MATH 1720 or MATH 1730; GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041 and GEOL 1050; major or minor in Geoscience. Introduction to field observation in geoscience. Topics include tape and compass surveys, orientation of rock strata, measurement of stratigraphic section, map preparation, and use of GPS. Three hours lecture/field work per week.

  • GEOL 4020 - Geomorphic Regions of the United States

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041. Origin, regional distribution, and geomorphic features and history of landforms of the United States. Students will be required to analyze maps, structure sections, and aerial photography to determine geomorphic forms and the forces and processes that produced these forms. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • GEOL 4050 - Meteorology  3 credit hours  

    GEOL 4050 - Meteorology

    3 credit hours

    A general, non-mathematical introduction to the atmosphere. Emphasis on main elements such as temperature, precipitation, clouds, and humidity. In-depth analysis of storms, tornadoes, and hurricanes and human alteration of the atmosphere such as the ozone hole. Weather forecasting and climate change.

  • PGEO 1030 - Physical Geography

    4 credit hours

    The physical earth as the home of humans. The global earth in space, tools of the discipline, the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, and the biosphere. Field trips may be required. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • Geoscience electives from any GEOL or PGEO course or any advisor-approved math or science electives. 12 credit hours

NOTE:

Geology concentration requires a B- or above in GEOL 1030/1031 and/or GEOL 1040/1041

Cognate (18 hours)

  • ABAS 3340 - Soil  3 credit hours  

    ABAS 3340 - Soil

    3 credit hours

    Physical, chemical, and biological properties. Lecture/lab.

  • PGEO 4530 - Geographic Information Systems

    3 credit hours

    Lecture and laboratory work relative to computer-manipulated geographic data base. Laboratory work will involve experience in practical application of a geographic information system (GIS) to problem solving.

  • MATH 1720 - Plane Trigonometry

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Strong background in algebra recommended. Trigonometric functions of the acute and general angle, circular functions, graphs of trigonometric and inverse functions, identities, solutions of right and general triangles, equations, complex numbers, and vectors. Not open to those who have had MATH 1730. Graphing calculator required.

  • Additional MATH/SCI electives to be approved by major academic advisor 9 credit hours

NOTE:

*Counted in General Education requirements

Electives (22 hours)

  • Approved by major academic advisor

Curriculum: Geoscience, Geology Concentration (Earth Science)

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

Following is a suggested pattern of study for the first two years; however, consultation with the assigned advisor is necessary before registration.

Freshman

 

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • GEOL 1050 - Historical Geology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1030 and GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041. The major divisions of geologic time with emphasis on earth movements, sea fluctuations, life of the time, and the effect these have had on our present environment. Close attention to the development of the physiographic regions of North America, which are correlated with chronologically similar events in other parts of the world. Topographic maps, geologic maps, and fossil animals and plants. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • MATH 1720 - Plane Trigonometry  3 credit hours  (Math)

    MATH 1720 - Plane Trigonometry

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Strong background in algebra recommended. Trigonometric functions of the acute and general angle, circular functions, graphs of trigonometric and inverse functions, identities, solutions of right and general triangles, equations, complex numbers, and vectors. Not open to those who have had MATH 1730. Graphing calculator required.

  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 6 credit hours
  • PGEO 1030 - Physical Geography

    4 credit hours

    The physical earth as the home of humans. The global earth in space, tools of the discipline, the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, and the biosphere. Field trips may be required. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

 

  • GEOL 1030 - Introduction to Earth Science

    3 credit hours

    Corequisite: GEOL 1031. The earth and its relationship to its space and environment emphasized. Forces and processes which combine to mold the face of the earth and its atmosphere, as well as the internal constitution of the earth. Three hours lecture. Together, GEOL 1030 and GEOL 1031 satisfy 4 hours of the Natural Sciences portion of the General Education requirement.

OR

  • GEOL 1040 - Physical Geology  4 credit hours  AND

    GEOL 1040 - Physical Geology

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: GEOL 1041. The origin, composition, and structure of the solid earth: rock-forming minerals; igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks; earthquakes and plate tectonics; surface processes; geologic time. Identification and description of minerals and rocks in hand sample. Use of topographic and geologic maps. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

 

Choose 6 hours from:

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 33 Hours

Sophomore

 

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

 

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • ABAS 3340 - Soil  3 credit hours  

    ABAS 3340 - Soil

    3 credit hours

    Physical, chemical, and biological properties. Lecture/lab.

  • GEOL 3000 - Mineralogy  5 credit hours  

    GEOL 3000 - Mineralogy

    5 credit hours

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041 or permission of instructor. Crystallography and crystal chemistry. Physical and chemical properties of silicate and non-silicate mineral groups. Examination of the common rock-forming minerals in hand sample and thin section. Four hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • GEOL 3010 - Oceanography  3 credit hours  

    GEOL 3010 - Oceanography

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041 or PGEO 1030. Physiography, structures, and sediments of the ocean floor; coastal and oceanic environments; and the nature of sea water, currents, waves, and tides. Geological processes, geophysical studies, and oceanographic instrumentation discussed.

  • Cognate electives 3 credit hours
  • Minor 3 credit hours
  • GEOL 4020 - Geomorphic Regions of the United States

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041. Origin, regional distribution, and geomorphic features and history of landforms of the United States. Students will be required to analyze maps, structure sections, and aerial photography to determine geomorphic forms and the forces and processes that produced these forms. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • GEOL 4050 - Meteorology  3 credit hours  

    GEOL 4050 - Meteorology

    3 credit hours

    A general, non-mathematical introduction to the atmosphere. Emphasis on main elements such as temperature, precipitation, clouds, and humidity. In-depth analysis of storms, tornadoes, and hurricanes and human alteration of the atmosphere such as the ozone hole. Weather forecasting and climate change.

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Junior

 

Subtotal: 29 Hours

Senior

 

Subtotal: 28 Hours

 

Total hours in program: 120

 

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Geoscience, Geology (Earth Science), B.S., Academic Map  

 


Geoscience, Geology Concentration (Geology), B.S.

Department of Geosciences 
615-904-8015
Clay Harris, program coordinator
Clay.Harris@mtsu.edu

This Geology career pattern is designed for students who plan to become professional geologists or who wish to pursue graduate study in geology. The Geology career pattern consists of 78 hours distributed among career pattern requirements (53 hours), and two cognates. An additional 41 hours of General Education requirements are required.

Required Courses (53 Hours)

 

  • GEOL 1030 - Introduction to Earth Science

    3 credit hours

    Corequisite: GEOL 1031. The earth and its relationship to its space and environment emphasized. Forces and processes which combine to mold the face of the earth and its atmosphere, as well as the internal constitution of the earth. Three hours lecture. Together, GEOL 1030 and GEOL 1031 satisfy 4 hours of the Natural Sciences portion of the General Education requirement.

OR

  • GEOL 1040 - Physical Geology  4 credit hours  AND

    GEOL 1040 - Physical Geology

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: GEOL 1041. The origin, composition, and structure of the solid earth: rock-forming minerals; igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks; earthquakes and plate tectonics; surface processes; geologic time. Identification and description of minerals and rocks in hand sample. Use of topographic and geologic maps. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

 

  • GEOL 1050 - Historical Geology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1030 and GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041. The major divisions of geologic time with emphasis on earth movements, sea fluctuations, life of the time, and the effect these have had on our present environment. Close attention to the development of the physiographic regions of North America, which are correlated with chronologically similar events in other parts of the world. Topographic maps, geologic maps, and fossil animals and plants. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • GEOL 3000 - Mineralogy  5 credit hours  

    GEOL 3000 - Mineralogy

    5 credit hours

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041 or permission of instructor. Crystallography and crystal chemistry. Physical and chemical properties of silicate and non-silicate mineral groups. Examination of the common rock-forming minerals in hand sample and thin section. Four hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • GEOL 3050 - Field Methods in Geology

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: MATH 1720 or MATH 1730; GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041 and GEOL 1050; major or minor in Geoscience. Introduction to field observation in geoscience. Topics include tape and compass surveys, orientation of rock strata, measurement of stratigraphic section, map preparation, and use of GPS. Three hours lecture/field work per week.

  • GEOL 3160 - Geologic Literature and Report Writing

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041; GEOL 1050; 8 semester hours of upper-division GEOL courses. Acquisition and presentation of geological data from traditional and database sources. Preparation of geologic field and laboratory reports in addition to professional reports and papers.

  • GEOL 4000 - Petrology and Petrography

    5 credit hours

    Prerequisite: GEOL 3000. Igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Theories of formation and evolution based upon mineralogical and geochemical evidence. Examination and classification of rocks in hand sample and thin section. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.

  • GEOL 4020 - Geomorphic Regions of the United States

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041. Origin, regional distribution, and geomorphic features and history of landforms of the United States. Students will be required to analyze maps, structure sections, and aerial photography to determine geomorphic forms and the forces and processes that produced these forms. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • GEOL 4030 - Invertebrate Paleontology

    5 credit hours

    Prerequisite: GEOL 1050. Invertebrate and microscopic animal life of the past, including recently preserved representatives and their ancient fossilized ancestors. Numerous field trips to local fossil-collecting sites. Designed to aid in the preparation of earth science teachers, geologists, and biologists. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.

  • GEOL 4070 - Sedimentation and Stratigraphy

    5 credit hours

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1050 and GEOL 3000 or consent of instructor. Sedimentary rocks, the process of sedimentation, the alteration of sediments through time, and examination of resulting stratigraphic units. Designed for geoscience majors and those with interests in soil mechanics and civil engineering. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.

  • GEOL 4080 - Structural Geology

    5 credit hours

    Prerequisites: MATH 1720 or  MATH 1730; GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041; GEOL 1050. Orientation and deformation of rock. Geometric, analytical, and statistical solutions to structural problems. Emphasis on three-dimensional visualization, geological map interpretation, and the mechanics of deformation. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.

  • GEOL 4100 - Geophysical Prospecting

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: MATH 1910; PHYS 2010/PHYS 2011 or PHYS 2110/PHYS 2111. (PHYS 2020/PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2120/PHYS 2121, GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041, and MATH 1920 also recommended.) Survey of seismic, gravimetric, and magnetic/electrical exploration methods. An applied course covering some elementary theory, basic field practice, computation fundamentals, interpretation techniques. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • GEOL 4130 - Hydrogeology  4 credit hours  

    GEOL 4130 - Hydrogeology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: MATH 1720 or MATH 1730; GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041; GEOL 1050. Basic processes and measurement of the hydrologic cycle, including precipitation, evaporation, surface runoff, stream flow, soil moisture, and ground water. Emphasis on ground water including geology of occurrence, principles of flow, conceptual models of regional flow, chemistry and quality, well hydraulics, aquifer characteristics, resource development, detection of pollutants, and contaminant transport. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • PGEO 4530 - Geographic Information Systems

    3 credit hours

    Lecture and laboratory work relative to computer-manipulated geographic data base. Laboratory work will involve experience in practical application of a geographic information system (GIS) to problem solving.

NOTE:

 Geology concentration requires grade of B- or above in GEOL 1030/1031 and/or GEOG 1040/1041.

Cognate 1

 

  • CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I  4 credit hours  AND *

    CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: High school chemistry. Corequisite: CHEM 1111. Fundamental concepts of atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometric relationships, periodic properties of the elements, thermochemistry, and properties of gases. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II  4 credit hours  AND

    CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Corequisite: CHEM 1121. Chemical equilibrium, solid and liquid states of matter, chemistry of acids and bases, principles of chemical kinetics, precipitation reactions, elementary thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  *

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1920 - Calculus II  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1920 - Calculus II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. A topics course providing a wide view of different techniques and applications of calculus in the plane. Techniques of integration and applications of integration fully developed. Power series and Taylor series included. Emphasis on multidisciplinary applications includes Taylor series approximation; applications of integration to physics, biology, and business; and geometric and power series applications. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH/SCI elective 3 credit hours

Cognate 2

 

  • PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2011. Web-based discussion class to be taken in conjunction with cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2011. Classical mechanics traditionally covered in a first-semester college physics course. Kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Class time used for discussion of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2010. Group-oriented problems course taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2010. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2010 discussion class. Covers kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

OR

  • PHYS 2110 - Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Corequisite: PHYS 2111. A calculus-based introduction to mechanics and wave motion. One and one-half hours lecture.

  • PHYS 2111 - Calculus-Based Physics Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Corequisite: PHYS 2110. Laboratory course to accompany PHYS 2110. Experiments in mechanics, waves, and thermodynamics. Data reduction, error analysis, and report writing. Two three-hour sessions.

 

  • BIOL 1110 - General Biology  4 credit hours  AND

    BIOL 1110 - General Biology

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: BIOL 1111. Primarily for Biology majors and minors and other science-oriented students. Biological principles and processes, including introduction to the nature of science, cells (structure, function, metabolism, division), genetics, evolution, viruses, bacteria, protists, and fungi. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory. While BIOL 1110 can be used to fulfill half the 8-hour General Education requirement for Natural Sciences, it is the first semester of a two-semester sequence primarily designed for science majors.

OR

  • PHYS 2020 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics II

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2021. Web-based discussion class taken in conjunction with the cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2021. Fundamentals of optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. Scheduled class time is used for discussions of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2021 - Physics Problems Laboratory II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2020. Group-oriented problems course to be taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2020. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2020 discussion class. Optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. The skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

OR

  • PHYS 2120 - Calculus-Based Physics II

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2111; MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Required corequisite: PHYS 2121. A lecture course that supplements the discussion in PHYS 2121. Topics include a microscopic view of electrical force and field, polarization, electric circuits, magnetic force and field, electric potential, symmetries of fields, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic radiation, optics, and wave phenomena. One and one-half hours lecture.

  • PHYS 2121 - Calculus-Based Physics Laboratory II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2111; MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Required corequisite: PHYS 2120. A laboratory-based course to accompany PHYS 2120. Includes discussions, group problem solving, and hands-on activities. Two three-hour sessions.

 

  • Geoscience elective 3 credit hours
  • Geology Field Camp in Western U.S. (advisor approved) 4 credit hours
  • MATH/SCI elective (major academic advisor approved) 3 credit hours (CSCI 1170 orMATH 2050 strongly recommended)

NOTE:

*Counted in General Education requirements

Curriculum: Geoscience, Geology Concentration (Geology)

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

Following is a suggested pattern of study for the first two years; however, consultation with the assigned advisor is necessary before registration.

Freshman

 

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • GEOL 1050 - Historical Geology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1030 and GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041. The major divisions of geologic time with emphasis on earth movements, sea fluctuations, life of the time, and the effect these have had on our present environment. Close attention to the development of the physiographic regions of North America, which are correlated with chronologically similar events in other parts of the world. Topographic maps, geologic maps, and fossil animals and plants. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • PGEO 4530 - Geographic Information Systems

    3 credit hours

    Lecture and laboratory work relative to computer-manipulated geographic data base. Laboratory work will involve experience in practical application of a geographic information system (GIS) to problem solving.

  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours

 

  • GEOL 1030 - Introduction to Earth Science

    3 credit hours

    Corequisite: GEOL 1031. The earth and its relationship to its space and environment emphasized. Forces and processes which combine to mold the face of the earth and its atmosphere, as well as the internal constitution of the earth. Three hours lecture. Together, GEOL 1030 and GEOL 1031 satisfy 4 hours of the Natural Sciences portion of the General Education requirement.

OR

  • GEOL 1040 - Physical Geology  4 credit hours  AND

    GEOL 1040 - Physical Geology

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: GEOL 1041. The origin, composition, and structure of the solid earth: rock-forming minerals; igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks; earthquakes and plate tectonics; surface processes; geologic time. Identification and description of minerals and rocks in hand sample. Use of topographic and geologic maps. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

 

Choose 6 hours from:

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 29 Hours

 

Sophomore

 

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

 

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  (Math)

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1920 - Calculus II  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1920 - Calculus II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. A topics course providing a wide view of different techniques and applications of calculus in the plane. Techniques of integration and applications of integration fully developed. Power series and Taylor series included. Emphasis on multidisciplinary applications includes Taylor series approximation; applications of integration to physics, biology, and business; and geometric and power series applications. Graphing calculator required.

  • GEOL courses 10 credit hours
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours

 

  • CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci) AND

    CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: High school chemistry. Corequisite: CHEM 1111. Fundamental concepts of atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometric relationships, periodic properties of the elements, thermochemistry, and properties of gases. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II  4 credit hours  AND

    CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Corequisite: CHEM 1121. Chemical equilibrium, solid and liquid states of matter, chemistry of acids and bases, principles of chemical kinetics, precipitation reactions, elementary thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

Subtotal: 32 Hours

 

Junior

 

Subtotal: 32 Hours

 

Senior

 

Subtotal: 27 Hours

 

Total hours in program: 120

 

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Geoscience, Geology (Geology Career Pattern), B.S., Academic Map  

Dr. Jeremy W. Aber
Assistant Professor
Jeremy.Aber@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Mark Abolins
Professor
mark.abolins@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Pat Boda
Associate Professor
pat.boda@mtsu.edu

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Alan Brown
Lecturer
alan.brown@mtsu.edu

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Laura Collins
Lecturer
laura.collins@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Warner Cribb
Chair
warner.cribb@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Racha El Kadiri
Assistant Professor
Racha.ElKadiri@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Clay Harris
Associate Professor | Geosciences Coordinator
clay.harris@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Jim Henry
Professor
jim.henry@mtsu.edu

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Michael Hiett
Lecturer
michael.hiett@mtsu.edu

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Zada Law
Director, Geospatial Research Center
zada.law@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Melissa Lobegeier
Associate Professor
melissa.lobegeier@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Henrique Momm
Assistant Professor | Director, MTSU GRC
henrique.momm@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Ron Zawislak
Professor
ron.zawislak@mtsu.edu

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Geography

PGEO 1030 - Physical Geography
4 credit hours

The physical earth as the home of humans. The global earth in space, tools of the discipline, the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, and the biosphere. Field trips may be required. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

PGEO 3000 - Maps and Mapping
3 credit hours

Introduces the art of making maps. Examines the cartographic process of effective symbolization, generalization, and interpretive processes that produce effective visualization of geographic data.

PGEO 3401 - Field Studies in Physical Geography
4 credit hours

Supervised study in some geographical area, preceded by classroom preview and concluded by a time of evaluation. Emphasis on natural and cultural elements of the environment with special attention directed toward the pattern of human occupancy. For fees and specific credit, consult the instructor.

PGEO 4000 - Climatology and Climate Change
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: PGEO 1030 or GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041. Non-mathematical introduction to the causes and patterns of global climates and in-depth analysis of climate change, including paleoclimatology and recent global cooling and warming trends, their natural and human-induced causes, potential future trends, human and environmental adaptation, and mitigation including geoengineering.

PGEO 4010 - Biogeography
3 credit hours

Prerequisites:PGEO 1030 or GEOL 1030/ GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040 GEOL 1041. Examines the science of biogeography, geographic principles, and foundations of biogeography. Topics include patterns of biodiversity, ecological biogeography, specialization and extinction forces, and the frontiers of biogeography.

PGEO 4020 - Environmental Issues, Impacts, and Sustainability
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: PGEO 1030 or GEOL 1030 GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040 GEOL 1041. Examines the geographic aspects of how locations affect such modern issues of air and water pollution, hazardous waste, climate change, and food production. Provides an overview of the modern environmental concerns, their causes, consequences, and factors needing to be examined in order to gain an understanding of these problems.

PGEO 4280 - Special Topics and Problems in Physical Geography
1 to 6 credit hours

Prerequisite: Permission of department. Research participation or guided readings in a particular area or topic appropriate to the student's interest and professional objectives.

PGEO 4380 - Cartography
4 credit hours

General knowledge of the field including familiarity with the techniques and tools of professional cartography and graphics. Selected lectures, class discussions, and a series of map construction assignments. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

PGEO 4490 - Remote Sensing
4 credit hours

The various aspects of remote sensing such as radar, satellite imagery, and infrared data. Use of data in preparation of maps and application to land use and environmental problems examined. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

PGEO 4510 - Laboratory Problems in Remote Sensing
4 credit hours

Prerequisite: PGEO 4490. Computer processing of selected satellite imagery. Laboratory will provide practical experience through design, execution, and completion of an applied remote sensing project.

PGEO 4511 - Advanced Remote Sensing
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PGEO 4490. Advanced topics in remote sensing including, but not limited to, active sensors (LiDAR and RADAR), hyperspectral, and spectroscopy. Three hours lecture/laboratory per week.

PGEO 4520 - Image Interpretation
4 credit hours

Principles, methods, and techniques of image interpretation, including maps, satellite data, and aerial photos. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

PGEO 4530 - Geographic Information Systems
3 credit hours

Lecture and laboratory work relative to computer-manipulated geographic data base. Laboratory work will involve experience in practical application of a geographic information system (GIS) to problem solving.

PGEO 4560 - Intermediate Geographic Information Systems
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PGEO 4530. Lecture and laboratory work related to the principles and applications of geographic information (GIS). Continued training in GIS analysis including raster analysis, spatial analysis, network analysis, and geocoding. Examines data management including data editing and geodatabase design and creation. Other topics include resource management, demographic, and civic applications.

PGEO 4570 - Advanced Geographic Information Systems
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PGEO 4560; coursework in statistics and computer programming recommended. Advanced course in spatial analysis. Using spatial statistics, Visual Basic programming, and databases to solve problems involving proximity, density, clustering, the cost of travel paths, etc. Other major topics include environmental modeling and error analysis.

PGEO 4571 - Internship in Physical Geography
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: Permission of department; major or minor in geography. Practical experience for students in a professional setting relating to geographic work. Counted as a free elective, not part of major or minor requirements. After completion of one internship, 4571 or GEOG 4572, the other may be taken (total of 6 credits).

Geology

GEOL 1030 - Introduction to Earth Science
3 credit hours

Corequisite: GEOL 1031. The earth and its relationship to its space and environment emphasized. Forces and processes which combine to mold the face of the earth and its atmosphere, as well as the internal constitution of the earth. Three hours lecture. Together, GEOL 1030 and GEOL 1031 satisfy 4 hours of the Natural Sciences portion of the General Education requirement.

GEOL 1031 - Introduction to Earth Science Lab
1 credit hour credit

Laboratory to accompany GEOL 1030.

GEOL 1040 - Physical Geology
4 credit hours

Corequisite: GEOL 1041. The origin, composition, and structure of the solid earth: rock-forming minerals; igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks; earthquakes and plate tectonics; surface processes; geologic time. Identification and description of minerals and rocks in hand sample. Use of topographic and geologic maps. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

GEOL 1041 - Physical Geology Lab
0 credit hours

Corequisite: GEOL 1040.

GEOL 1050 - Historical Geology
4 credit hours

Prerequisites: GEOL 1030 and GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041. The major divisions of geologic time with emphasis on earth movements, sea fluctuations, life of the time, and the effect these have had on our present environment. Close attention to the development of the physiographic regions of North America, which are correlated with chronologically similar events in other parts of the world. Topographic maps, geologic maps, and fossil animals and plants. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

GEOL 3000 - Mineralogy
5 credit hours

Prerequisites: GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041 or permission of instructor. Crystallography and crystal chemistry. Physical and chemical properties of silicate and non-silicate mineral groups. Examination of the common rock-forming minerals in hand sample and thin section. Four hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

GEOL 3010 - Oceanography
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041 or PGEO 1030. Physiography, structures, and sediments of the ocean floor; coastal and oceanic environments; and the nature of sea water, currents, waves, and tides. Geological processes, geophysical studies, and oceanographic instrumentation discussed.

GEOL 3030 - Geoscience of Energy Resources
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041 or PGEO 1030. Geoscience aspects of energy resources and their impact on the environment. Topics include occurrence, exploration, development, and reclamation, as well as historical trends. Three hours lecture per week.  

GEOL 3050 - Field Methods in Geology
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: MATH 1720 or MATH 1730; GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041 and GEOL 1050; major or minor in Geoscience. Introduction to field observation in geoscience. Topics include tape and compass surveys, orientation of rock strata, measurement of stratigraphic section, map preparation, and use of GPS. Three hours lecture/field work per week.

GEOL 3060 - Computer Methods in Geology
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041 and GEOL 1050; major or minor in Geology/Earth Science. Extensive use of personal computers for processing field data, map contouring, geologic reports and illustrations, lettering and cartography, image processing, geologic databases, and digital maps. Brief treatment of classical cartography. Four to five hours lecture/laboratory per week.

GEOL 3160 - Geologic Literature and Report Writing
2 credit hours

Prerequisites: GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041; GEOL 1050; 8 semester hours of upper-division GEOL courses. Acquisition and presentation of geological data from traditional and database sources. Preparation of geologic field and laboratory reports in addition to professional reports and papers.

GEOL 3401 - Field Course
4 credit hours

Prerequisite: Permission of department. Supervised study in some geological area preceded by classroom preview and concluded by a time of evaluation. Emphasis on the natural and physical elements of the environment, with special attention directed toward the geomorphology and geology of specific areas. For fees and specific credit, consult the director, division of geology.

GEOL 3402 - Field Course
4 credit hours

Prerequisite: Permission of department. Supervised study in some geological area preceded by classroom preview and concluded by a time of evaluation. Emphasis on the natural and physical elements of the environment, with special attention directed toward the geomorphology and geology of specific areas. For fees and specific credit, consult the director, division of geology.

GEOL 4000 - Petrology and Petrography
5 credit hours

Prerequisite: GEOL 3000. Igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Theories of formation and evolution based upon mineralogical and geochemical evidence. Examination and classification of rocks in hand sample and thin section. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.

GEOL 4020 - Geomorphic Regions of the United States
4 credit hours

Prerequisites: GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041. Origin, regional distribution, and geomorphic features and history of landforms of the United States. Students will be required to analyze maps, structure sections, and aerial photography to determine geomorphic forms and the forces and processes that produced these forms. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

GEOL 4030 - Invertebrate Paleontology
5 credit hours

Prerequisite: GEOL 1050. Invertebrate and microscopic animal life of the past, including recently preserved representatives and their ancient fossilized ancestors. Numerous field trips to local fossil-collecting sites. Designed to aid in the preparation of earth science teachers, geologists, and biologists. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.

GEOL 4040 - Engineering Geology
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041 or equivalent; MATH 1710 and MATH 1720 or MATH 1730 or equivalent. Principles and applications of geology in engineering practice. Engineering geology exploration, behavior of soils and rocks for engineering projects, application of engineering geology to the solution of construction and environmental problems.

GEOL 4050 - Meteorology
3 credit hours

A general, non-mathematical introduction to the atmosphere. Emphasis on main elements such as temperature, precipitation, clouds, and humidity. In-depth analysis of storms, tornadoes, and hurricanes and human alteration of the atmosphere such as the ozone hole. Weather forecasting and climate change.

GEOL 4070 - Sedimentation and Stratigraphy
5 credit hours

Prerequisites: GEOL 1050 and GEOL 3000 or consent of instructor. Sedimentary rocks, the process of sedimentation, the alteration of sediments through time, and examination of resulting stratigraphic units. Designed for geoscience majors and those with interests in soil mechanics and civil engineering. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.

GEOL 4080 - Structural Geology
5 credit hours

Prerequisites: MATH 1720 or  MATH 1730; GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041; GEOL 1050. Orientation and deformation of rock. Geometric, analytical, and statistical solutions to structural problems. Emphasis on three-dimensional visualization, geological map interpretation, and the mechanics of deformation. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.

GEOL 4090 - Problems in Geology
1 to 6 credit hours

Prerequisites: A minimum of 12 semester hours of geology (excluding GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031) at least 6 hours of which must be upper division; consent of instructor. A problem-solving course. Includes an independent research-oriented project commensurate with the student's interests and qualifications. May be repeated up to a maximum of 6 hours.

GEOL 4100 - Geophysical Prospecting
4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MATH 1910; PHYS 2010/PHYS 2011 or PHYS 2110/PHYS 2111. (PHYS 2020/PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2120/PHYS 2121, GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041, and MATH 1920 also recommended.) Survey of seismic, gravimetric, and magnetic/electrical exploration methods. An applied course covering some elementary theory, basic field practice, computation fundamentals, interpretation techniques. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

GEOL 4120 - Environmental Geology
4 credit hours

Prerequisites: GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041 or PGEO 1030 or consent of instructor. Application of geologic information to minimize possible environmental degradation and maximize utilization of resources in the natural and modified environment; local examples and field trips. Topics include engineering properties of earth materials, natural hazard prediction and reduction, water supply, solid and hazardous wastes, mineral resources, global change, land-use planning, environmental impact analysis. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

GEOL 4130 - Hydrogeology
4 credit hours

Prerequisites: MATH 1720 or MATH 1730; GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041; GEOL 1050. Basic processes and measurement of the hydrologic cycle, including precipitation, evaporation, surface runoff, stream flow, soil moisture, and ground water. Emphasis on ground water including geology of occurrence, principles of flow, conceptual models of regional flow, chemistry and quality, well hydraulics, aquifer characteristics, resource development, detection of pollutants, and contaminant transport. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

GEOL 4140 - Inorganic Geochemistry
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: GEOL 3000. Principles of inorganic geochemistry. Geochemistry of the earth and solar system, isotopic geochronometers, thermodynamics and rates of geochemical processes, chemical weathering, chemical compositions of surface and groundwater. Three hours lecture per week.

GEOL 4150 - Environmental Applications of Hydrogeology
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: GEOL 4130. An advanced course in hydrogeology that emphasizes applied methods for assessing hazardous and solid waste facilities and contaminated ground water remediation techniques. Included will be site characterization methods, ground water sampling procedures, and monitoring well installation techniques. Three hours lecture per week.

GEOL 4571 - Internship in Geology
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: Major or minor in geology; 15 hours of geology/geography with junior or senior standing; permission of employer and department. Practical experience for students in a professional setting relating to geologic work. Counted as a free elective, not as a part of major or minor requirement. After completion of one internship, 4571 or GEOL 4572, the other may be taken (total of six credits).

GEOL 4572 - Internship in Geology
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: Major or minor in geology; 15 hours of geology/geography with junior or senior standing; permission of employer and department. Practical experience for students in a professional setting relating to geologic work. Counted as a free elective, not as a part of major or minor requirement. After completion of one internship, GEOL 4571 or 4572, the other may be taken (total of six credits).

GEOL 4580 - Seminar in Geology
1 credit hour credit

Prerequisite: Senior standing in geology. A reading and discussion seminar in which current topics in the geological sciences are examined to broaden the major's knowledge of the scope and literature of the discipline.

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